Board of Directors

The SSRC is governed by a board of directors made up of social scientists and practitioners from a broad range of disciplines and institutions. The board elects the SSRC president and regularly reviews the Council’s intellectual program. An executive committee of the board oversees financial and operational aspects.

List of Board Members

Jonathan Aronson
Professor of Communications
Professor of International Relations
University of Southern California

John Seely Brown
Visiting Scholar
Advisor to the Provost
University of Southern California
Independent Cochairman
Deloitte’s Center for the Edge

Teresa P. R. Caldeira
Professor of City and Regional Planning
College of Environmental Design
University of California at Berkeley

Sandra Dawson (Chair, Executive Committee)
Deputy Vice Chancellor and Professor of Management Studies
University of Cambridge

Mamadou Diouf (Chair, Board of Directors)
Leitner Family Professor of African Studies
Director of the Institute of African Studies
Columbia University

Michael Gellert
General Partner and Cofounder
Windcrest Partners

Edward Glaeser
Professor of Economics
Harvard University

Alfred Gusenbauer
Visiting Scholar
Harvard University
James Leitner Fellow for Global Affairs
Columbia University

William H. Janeway
Senior Advisor
Warburg Pincus

Ira Katznelson (Ex Officio)
President
SSRC

Michael D. Kennedy
Professor of Sociology and International Studies
Brown University

Margaret Levi
Professor of Political Science
University of Washington
Professor of Politics
University of Sydney

Ellen Levy
Managing Director
Silicon Valley Connect

Helen V. Milner
Director, Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance
B. C. Forbes Professor of Politics and International Affairs
Princeton University

Thandika Mkandawire
Chair in African Development
London School of Economics

Peter Nager
Senior Managing Director
Egret Capital Partners

Walter W. Powell
Professor of Education and (by courtesy) Sociology, Organizational Behavior, Management Science and Engineering, Communication, and Public Policy
Codirector, Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
Stanford University

John Shepard Reed
Chairman of the Corporation
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Hyun Song Shin
Professor of Economics
Princeton University

Barbara Stallings
Professor of International Studies [Research]
Watson Institute
Brown University

Michael J. Watts
Director of Development Studies
Professor of Geography
University of California, Berkeley



Jonathan Aronson

Jonathan Aronson is professor of communication at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California, professor of International Relations, and director of the Annenberg Research Network on International Communication (ARNIC), at the University of Southern California. His research interests include international communications, international communications policy, and global governance. He investigates how communication and network developments related to privacy, equity, standard setting, competition policy, cybersecurity, and international intellectual property shape the path of globalization. His book (with P. Cowhey) Transforming Global Information and Communication Markets: The Political Economy of Innovation (MIT, 2009) explains how innovation in information and communication technology (ICT) fuels the growth of the global economy. Previously he was director of the USC School of International Relations, executive director of the Annenberg Center of Communication, and co-director of the European Union Center of California. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and served as president of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA). Professor Aronson received his degrees from Stanford (1976) and Harvard (1971). He received an honorary doctorate from Saint Petersburg State University in 2000.

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John Seely Brown

Executive Committee Member

John Seely Brown is currently a visiting scholar at the University of Southern California and also the independent co-chairman of Deloitte’s Center for the Edge. He was chief scientist of Xerox Corporation until April 2002 and also director of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center until June 2000, a position he held for twelve years. While head of PARC, Dr. Brown expanded the role of corporate research to include such topics as organizational learning, complex adaptive systems, microelectricalmechanical systems, and nanotechnology. His personal research interests include digital culture and rich media, ubiquitous computing, institutional innovation, and organizational and individual learning. He has published over a hundred papers in scientific journals and is co-author of The Social Life of Information (with Paul Duguid, HBS Press, 2000), The Only Sustainable Edge (with John Hagel, HBS Press, 2005) ) and The Power of Pull with John Hagel and Lang Davison (Basic Book, 2010). Dr. Brown serves as a trustee of the MacArthur Foundation and on the boards of Amazon, Corning, and Varian Medical Systems.

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Teresa P. R. Caldeira

Teresa P. R. Caldeira is professor of city and regional planning at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research focuses on predicaments of urbanization and reconfigurations of spatial segregation and social discrimination, mostly in cities of the global south. She has been especially interested in studying the relationships between urban form and political transformation, particularly in the context of democratization. An anthropologist by training, she has been especially interested in reshaping ethnographic methods for the study of cities and political action, a perspective exemplified in her award-winning book City of Walls: Crime, Segregation, and Citizenship in São Paulo. In 2012, she was named a Guggenheim Fellow and received the UC President’s Faculty Research Fellowship in the Humanities to work on a research project on new urban practices (from graffiti and tagging to skateboarding and motorcycling) that are transforming São Paulo and its public spaces. These practices not only give the subaltern new visibility but also express new forms of political action. Caldeira was educated at the University of São Paulo (BA in social sciences and MA in political science) and at the University of California, Berkeley (PhD in anthropology). She worked as a professor and researcher in the Brazilian university system between 1980 and 1996. She was a researcher at the Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning (CEBRAP), one of Brazil’s most important research centers in the social sciences, for fifteen years. She was also a professor at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP), São Paulo, before joining the University of California, Irvine. She became a member of the UC Berkeley faculty in 2007. Her work has been published in several languages.

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Dame Sandra Dawson

Executive Committee Chair

Dame Sandra Dawson is KPMG Professor of Management Studies at Judge Business School. She has served as a deputy vice chancellor of the University of Cambridge (2007–2012); master of Sidney Sussex College (1999–2009), the first woman to hold such an office in one of the Cambridge colleges, founded originally for men; and director of Judge Business School (1995–2006). Dawson’s research focuses on leadership, knowledge sharing, organizational change, and health management and policy. She serves as a board member of DRS PLC, the Institute for Government, and the Financial Services Authority. Previous board memberships include Oxfam, Barclays Bank, and an investment trust. She is a member of an advisory group for Aga Khan University on the establishment of a management school to serve the needs of emerging economies, the UK-India Round Table, and the British prime minister’s Council for Science and Technology. Prior to her appointment at Cambridge University, Dawson was professor of organizational behavior and deputy director of the Management School at Imperial College, London University. She holds a BA from Keele University and an MA from the University of Cambridge. She has been awarded an honorary DSc from Keele as well as fellowship status from City and Guilds and was honored with the Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

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Mamadou Diouf

Chair • Executive Committee Member

Mamadou Diouf is Leitner Family Professor of African Studies and History at Columbia University, where he also leads the Institute of African Studies. Prior to teaching at Columbia, he taught at the University of Michigan and before that at Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar, Senegal. Educated primarily in France, Diouf is a renowned West African scholar who has taught in his native Senegal at the University Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar and guest-lectured at many European and American universities. He holds a Ph.D.from the University of Paris-Sorbonne (France). His research interests include urban, political, social and intellectual history in colonial and postcolonial Africa. His most recent books are Histoire du Sénégal: Le Modèle Islamo-Wolof Et Ses Périphéries (2001) and La Construction de l’Etat au Sénégal, with M. C. Diop & D. Cruise O’Brien (2002). He is the author, editor and co-author of several other works including Rhythms of the Afro-Atlantic : Rituals and Remembrances (2010), edited with I. Nwankwo, New Perspectives on Islam in Senegal: Conversion, Migration, Wealth, Power and Feminity (2009), Les Figures du Politique En Afrique, Des Pouvoirs Hérités aux Pouvoirs Elus (1999) and Les Jeunes, Hantise de L'Espace Public dans Les Sociétés du Sud (2001). He is also a member of the editorial board of several professional journals including African Studies Review and la vie des idées.fr. He is also the co-editor (with Peter Geschiere) of the book series, Histoires du Sud/Histories of the South, Karthala, Paris, France.

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Michael Gellert

Michael Gellert is a general partner of Windcrest Partners, which he cofounded in 1968, a director of Dalet Technologies, and a director emeritus of Seacor Holdings. Gellert is active in a number of nonprofit organizations, including the Carnegie Institution for Science, the New School, Human Rights Watch, the Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, and the New York City Opera. He received a BA from Harvard University and an MBA from the Wharton School.

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Edward Glaeser

Investment Committee Member

Ed Glaeser is Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard, where he has taught since 1992. He serves as director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. He studies the economics of cities and has written on scores of urban issues, including the growth of cities, segregation, crime, and housing markets. In particular, his work has focused on the determinants of city growth and the role of cities as centers of idea transmission. He has been particularly interested in the role that geographic proximity can play in creating knowledge and innovation. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago in 1992. Dr. Glaeser has written numerous journal and op-ed articles. His books include Cities, Agglomeration, and Spatial Equilibrium (Oxford University Press, 2008) and Rethinking Federal Housing Policy (American Enterprise Institute Press, 2008).

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Alfred Gusenbauer

Alfred Gusenbauer, most recently chancellor of Austria, is visiting professor in international studies at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies and is the first Leitner Global Fellow at the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs. He is the chair of the Next Left Research Project of the Party of European Socialists (PES) and the owner and CEO of Gusenbauer Project - an Austrian based consulting company. He holds several different board positions, including chairman of the board of STRABAG SE - one of Europe's largest construction companies. During his career, former chancellor Gusenbauer has served Austria’s Social Democratic Party (SPÖ) and government in many capacities, among them party leader, leader of the Social Democratic Group in the Austrian Parliament, vice president of the Socialist International, and vice president of the International Union of Socialist Youth. He studied political science, philosophy, and law at the University of Vienna, where he earned his law degree and a PhD in political science. He is author of Netzwerk Innovation (Network Innovation) (Czernin Verlag, 2002).

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William H. Janeway

Investment Committee Chair • Executive Committee Member • Secretary

William H. Janeway is a managing director and senior advisor at Warburg Pincus. He received his doctorate in economics from Cambridge University, where he was a Marshall Scholar. He was valedictorian of the class of 1965 at Princeton University. Prior to joining Warburg Pincus in 1988, where he was responsible for building the information technology practice, he was executive vice president and director at Eberstadt Fleming. Dr. Janeway sits on the boards of directors of Magnet Systems, Nuance Communications, O’Reilly Media, Roubini Global Economics, and Wall Street Systems. He is also chairman of the Board of Trustees of Cambridge in America, University of Cambridge and co-chair of Cambridge’s 800th Anniversary Capital Campaign, as well as a founding member of the board of managers of the Cambridge Endowment for Research in Finance. He is also a member of the Board of Governors of the Institute for New Economic Thinking.

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Michael D. Kennedy

Treasurer • Executive Committee Member • Audit Committee Member

Michael D. Kennedy is professor of sociology and international studies at Brown University where he explores the relationship between knowledge practices and global transformations. Beginning with studies of intellectuals and professionals in East European social movements and systemic change (e.g. Professionals, Power and Solidarity (1991), Cultural Formations of Postcommunism (2002)), Kennedy now works on how transformations in the communicative capacities of intellectuals and their institutions articulate alternative futures around extensions of democracy, peace, and sustainability with particular places in mind. His most recent publications have addressed the public university, area studies and energy security in these terms. He has also explored these relationships in academic administration; he served as the University of Michigan's first Vice Provost for International Affairs and founding director of its Weiser Center for Europe and Eurasia and Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies; director of its Center for Russian and East European Studies, Center for European Studies/European Union Center for Excellence, and Program for the Comparative Study of Social Transformations; as well as the Howard R. Swearer Director of the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University. Professor Kennedy has received awards in recognition of his teaching, including the University of Michigan's Class of 1923 Memorial Teaching Award and the University Teaching Award. Poland's President, Aleksander Kwasniewski, presented Professor Kennedy with the Gold Cross of Merit to recognize the contributions he made to scholarship and education about Poland.

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Margaret Levi

Audit Committee Chair

Margaret Levi has a joint appointment as the Jere L. Bacharach Professor of International Studies in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington and as the chair in politics in the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. She is director of the CHAOS (Comparative Historical Analysis of Organizations and States) Center and formerly the chair and director of the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies. She earned her BA from Bryn Mawr College in 1968 and her PhD from Harvard University in 1974, the year she joined the faculty of the University of Washington. She became a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001 and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow in 2002. She served as president of the American Political Science Association from 2004 to 2005. Levi is the author or coauthor of numerous articles and six books, including Of Rule and Revenue (University of California Press, 1988); Consent, Dissent, and Patriotism (Cambridge University Press, 1997); Analytic Narratives (Princeton University Press, 1998); and Cooperation without Trust? (Russell Sage, 2005). She is coeditor of six other books. She is currently completing a book, with John Ahlquist, entitled Building a Community of Fate, which explores how organizations provoke member willingness to act beyond material interest. In other work, she investigates the conditions under which people come to believe their governments are legitimate and the consequences of those beliefs for compliance, consent, and the rule of law. Levi recently served as chair of the board of directors of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. She continues to serve as general editor of the Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics book series and of the Annual Review of Political Science. She is also involved in research and networks devoted to understanding and improving supply chains so that the goods we consume are produced in a manner that sustains both the workers and the environment. Levi and her husband, Robert Kaplan, are avid collectors of Australian Aboriginal art. Ancestral Modern, an exhibition drawn from their collection, was on view this summer at the Seattle Art Museum, with a catalogue copublished by Yale University Press and the museum.  

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Ellen Levy

Ellen Levy is managing director at Silicon Valley Connect. Formerly, she was director of industry collaboration and research at Stanford University’s Media X, a program that facilitated collaboration between Stanford scholars, corporate leaders, and policymakers. She continues her work with universities as a member of the board of councilors for Steven’s Innovation Institute at the University of Southern California and as an advisor to the Harvard Kennedy School’s Decision Science Laboratory. During the course of her career, Dr. Levy has had formal roles in venture capital (Softbank, NeoCarta, Draper Fisher Jurvetson), start-ups (WhoWhere, Softbook), technology think tanks (Interval Research), big companies (Apple Computer, PriceWaterhouse), foundations (Clinton Global Initiative), and universities (Harvard, Stanford). She received her BS from the University of Michigan and her MA and PhD in cognitive psychology from Stanford University.

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Helen V. Milner

Helen V. Milner is B. C. Forbes Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and director of the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School. She has written extensively on issues related to international political economy; the connections between domestic politics and foreign policy, globalization, and regionalism; and the relationship between democracy and trade policy. In addition to numerous articles, her writings include the volumes Resisting Protectionism (1988); Interests, Institutions, and Information: Domestic Politics and International Relations (1997); The Political Economy of Regionalism (coedited with Edward Mansfield, 1997); Internationalization and Domestic Politics (coedited with Robert Keohane, 1996), and Votes, Vetoes, and the Political Economy of International Trade Agreements (coauthored with Edward Mansfield, 2012). Milner is currently working on issues related to globalization and development, such as the political economy of foreign aid, the "digital divide" and the global diffusion of the Internet, and the relationship between globalization and democracy. Another strand of her recent research deals with American foreign policy and the so-called grand strategy of liberal internationalism, and she is investigating the sources of public and elite preferences for engagement with the international economy in the areas of international trade, foreign aid, and immigration. Milner is president of the International Political Science Association.

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Thandika Mkandawire

Thandika Mkandawire is professor and chair, African development, at the London School of Economics; he is the first person to assume the new position of chair. He was formerly director of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, director of the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA), and a senior research fellow at the Centre for Development Research in Copenhagen. He has taught at the Universities of Stockholm and Zimbabwe and currently holds the Olof Palme Professorship for Peace at the Institute for Future Studies in Stockholm. Of Malawian origin, Mkandawire is an economist with particular expertise on development issues. His research interests are mostly in development theory, economic policy and development, social policy in developing countries, and the political economy of development in Africa.

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Peter Nager

Investment Committee Member

Peter Nager is senior managing director at the investment firm Egret Capital Partners. He is a former partner of the corporate advisory and investment banking firm James D. Wolfensohn. Following the sale of Wolfensohn to Bankers Trust (BT), he became a partner and senior managing director at BT and assumed the same positions with Deutsche Bank upon its merger with BT. Earlier in his career, he was a lawyer at the firm Debevoise & Plimpton, specializing in mergers and acquisitions. Nager has advised the boards, CEOs, and other senior executives of such noteworthy companies as Dupont, Unisys, Lubrizol, Johns Manville, Major League Baseball, John Labatt, Northern Telecom, Ault Foods, and Nova Chemicals. His advisory work encompassed traditional transactional mergers-and-acquisitions work as well as financing assistance and corporate strategy. Nager is involved in numerous charitable endeavors. He is a member of the board of trustees and of the executive committee of the Caramoor International Music Festival, held every summer in Westchester County, NY, as well as of the boards of trustees of the Beaver Dam Sanctuary, also in Westchester County, and the City Parks Foundation in New York City. He also is a member of the NYU-Poly Incubator Advisory Board as well as the Board of Advisors of The Black Box Institute in Toronto, Canada. Previously, Nager served as president of Symphony Space on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

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Walter W. Powell

Executive Committee Member • Audit Committee Member

Walter W. Powell is professor of education and (by courtesy) sociology, organizational behavior, management science and engineering, communication, and public policy at Stanford University, where he is co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society. Professor Powell works in the areas of organization theory, economic sociology, and the sociology of science. An author of numerous articles and books, he is most widely known for his contributions to institutional analysis and network studies. His current research projects include an examination of the effects of interdisciplinary and translational research on scientific innovation, and the ramifications of the growing use of benchmarking metrics by nonprofit organizations to purportedly “account” for virtue. He has served on the SSRC Board since 2000.

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John Shepard Reed

John Shepard Reed was born in Chicago in 1939 and was raised in Argentina and Brazil. He came to the United States to go to college and graduated from Washington and Jefferson College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1961 under a joint degree program, earning BA and BS degrees. He served as a lieutenant in the US Army Corp of Engineers from 1962 to 1964 and then returned to MIT for his MS. Mr. Reed spent thirty-five years with Citibank/Citicorp and Citigroup, the last sixteen years as chairman, retiring in April of 2000. He returned to work as chairman of the New York Stock Exchange from September 2003 until April 2005 and is currently serving as chairman of the Corporation of MIT. Mr. Reed is a trustee of MDRC, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society.

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Hyun Song Shin

Hyun Song Shin is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of Economics at Princeton University. His research interests cover financial institutions and risk and financial stability issues, topics on which he has published widely both in academic and policy outlets. He is the author of Risk and Liquidity, the 2008 Clarendon Lectures in Finance, and coauthored the 2009 Geneva Report on the World Economy, The Fundamental Principles of Financial Regulation. Before moving to Princeton in 2006, he was based in the United Kingdom, where he held academic positions at Oxford University and the London School of Economics. Professor Shin is a Korean national. In 2010 he was on leave from Princeton, serving in a policy role in Korea as the senior advisor to President Lee Myung-bak on the international economy. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and of the British Academy.

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Barbara Stallings

Barbara Stallings is William R. Rhodes Research Professor at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University. She is also editor of Studies in Comparative International Development. Before arriving at Brown in 2002, she was director of the Economic Development Division of the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean in Santiago, Chile (1993–2002) and professor of political economy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1977–93). She has been a visiting professor or visiting scholar at Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Columbia, Berkeley, the University of Tokyo, the Institute for Southeast Asian Studies, the Institute for Fiscal and Monetary Affairs of Japan’s Ministry of Finance, and a number of universities and research centers in Latin America. She has doctorates in economics (University of Cambridge) and in political science (Stanford University) and is a specialist in development economics, with emphasis on development strategies and international finance. In addition, she works on issues of economic relations between Asia and Latin America and comparisons between the two regions. Her most recent book is Finance for Development: Latin America in Comparative Perspective (Brookings Institution, 2006), a comparison of the financial sector in Latin America and East Asia.

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Michael J. Watts

Michael J. Watts is Class of ‘63 Professor of Geography at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught for thirty years. He served as the director of the Institute of International Studies at Berkeley from 1994 to 2004. His research has addressed a number of development issues, especially food security, resource development, and land reform in Africa, South Asia, and Vietnam. Over the last twenty years he has written extensively on the oil industry, especially in West Africa and the Gulf of Guinea; his most recent book is The Curse of the Black Gold: Fifty Years of Oil in the Niger Delta (Powerhouse Books, 2008), with photographer Ed Kashi. Professor Watts was a Guggenheim Fellow in 2003 and was awarded the Victoria Medal by the Royal Geographical Society in 2004. He has consulted for a number of development agencies, including the United Nations, the World Bank, and other development organizations and has provided expert testimony for governmental and other agencies. He was educated at University College London and the University of Michigan and has held visiting appointments at the Smithsonian Institution and at the universities of Bergen, Bologna, and London. He serves on the boards of advisors for a number of nonprofits, including Food First and the Pacific Institute.

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