• Aaron George Jakes

    Delta Forces: Egypt's Agrarian Transformation in Global Comparative Perspective, 1882-1914

    Year
    2009
    University/Institution
    New York University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Aaron Malone

    Partnering for Development? Examining diaspora-state interactions in Mexico's 3x1 Program.

    Year
    2014
    University/Institution
    University of Colorado at Boulder
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Aaron Shackelford

    "I Think I Could Turn and Live Awhile With the Animals": The Writer's Struggle with Animals in America, 1850-1865

    Year
    2008
    University/Institution
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Abdoulaye Sounaye

    Muslim Epistemologies of Social Transformation in Niger

    Year
    2008
    University/Institution
    Northwestern University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Abhit Bhandari

    Elites, Property Rights, and Economic Growth in Developing Countries
    How do firms ensure their contracts will be enforced in environments often characterized by weak rule of law? Where does the protection of property rights come from, and who does it exist for? When do economic actors carve out their own rule of law? Answers to these understudied questions have enormous implications for economic growth in the developing world. I argue that domestic political competition among elites can bring about surprising advancements in the protection of property rights. I highlight two specific mechanisms that may spur the development of informal and formal property rights systems: diffuse power networks characterized by clientelism, and the degree of economic complexity. I will use a combination of formal modeling, experimental research, and in-depth case studies of Senegal and Mozambique to illustrate the mechanisms at work. The results of such research have implications for domestic and international policy aimed at encouraging political economic development.

    Year
    2015
    University/Institution
    Columbia University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Abigail Anne Dumes

    Musical Citizenship: Race, Religion, and the Politics of Belonging among African Gospel Performers in France.”

    Year
    2007
    University/Institution
    Yale University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Abigail E. Bennett

    Linking Global Factors and Local Institutional Diversity: Responses of Small-Scale Fisheries to Globilization

    Year
    2012
    University/Institution
    Duke University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Abigail Lapin Dardashti

    Re-Constructing Blackness in Brazil: Politics, Race, and Modernity in Art and Architecture, 1950s-1980s
    Starting in the 1950s, the Brazilian government positioned itself as a leading economic partner for emerging, independent African nations. Through officially-sponsored art exhibitions and academic exchanges, state assertions of "pure" Africanness denied the centuries-long development of Afro-Brazilian culture, which was presented as anachronistic. Responding to the state's essentialization of blackness, an emerging Afro-Brazilian civil rights movement not only exposed the country's pervasive racial inequalities, but also developed a public and modern Afro-Brazilian cultural identity. By depicting Afro-Brazilians, their religions, and their neighborhoods on a monumental scale in paintings, sculptures, and photographs, visual artists challenged persistent stereotypical depictions of "blackness" as backward and folkloric. The connections between art-making, the civil rights movement, and official artistic exchanges with Africa have remained largely unstudied. My dissertation positions artworks and exhibitions as both critical to the civil rights movement and fundamental in constructing the official discourse of Brazilian blackness.

    Year
    2016
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Abigail Noelle Martin

    Towards Biomass Sustainability Assurance: Technology, Politics and Governance

    Year
    2008
    University/Institution
    University of California, Berkeley
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adam Fish

    The Physical and Virtual Worlds of New Media Firms

    Year
    2010
    University/Institution
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adrien P. Zakar

    Provincial Commodities, Environmental Thinking and the Making of Nation States in the Middle East

    Year
    2013
    University/Institution
    Columbia University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adrienne P. Dunn

    A Long Way From Home: African American Female Exodusters from the South to the West 1879-1900

    Year
    2011
    University/Institution
    Howard University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Aimi Hamraie

    The Science & Phenomenology of the Body in Universal Design: a feminist, disability studies approach

    Year
    2010
    University/Institution
    Emory University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Akissi M. Britton

    From Brooklyn to Brazil: Race, Place, and Religion in the Mapping of Diasporic Blackness

    Year
    2007
    University/Institution
    City University of New York Graduate Center
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alana Sylvie Ackerman

    Refugees or Regional Citizens? Shifting Migration Governance in Twenty-First Century Ecuador
    In recent decades, Colombian migrants in Ecuador have frequently been categorized as refugees owing to the history of armed conflict in Colombia. In April 2014, Ecuador began to implement the new Mercosur residency visa, allowing Colombian migrants facilitated access to documented status in Ecuador as regional residents rather than as refugees. My project explores this shifting legal and bureaucratic landscape and the ways it calls into being new migrant subjectivities in twenty-first century Ecuador. Through participant observation in bureaucratic spaces and interviews with government functionaries, NGO workers, and Colombian migrants, I aim to conduct an ethnography of changing migration governance in Ecuador. I also aim to examine the political and ideological contexts that frame this new visa regime, including Ecuador's bilateral relations with Colombia, its participation in processes of regional integration, and its invocation of "twenty-first century socialism.".

    Year
    2016
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alberto E. Morales

    The Work of Marine Bioprospecting in Panama

    Year
    2014
    University/Institution
    University of California, Irvine
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alejandro Flores

    Non-English Campaign Strategies: A Proposed Model for Language as Persuasion
    In the U.S., non-English modes of political communication are thought to have an implied persuasive effect on social cognition, capable of influencing how an individual processes information. For example, President Obama aired television ads on Spanish networks for both his 2008 and 2012 campaigns. The passing and cursory assumption is that these non-English strategies resonated with Latino voters. Given the significant role that non-English political appeals play in American politics, the initial question is: are non-English political appeals more persuasive to bilinguals than English-language appeals? And if so, how does the language in which they are presented contribute to their persuasive power? Using survey data and laboratory experiments, I devise a model that demarcates the extent and conditions by which non-English political communication is most persuasive. More broadly, this study explores how targeted messaging—namely, choosing a non-English language—activates particular cognitive processes.

    Year
    2015
    University/Institution
    University of Chicago
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alex Cobb Boodrookas

    Forging Citizen and State in Kuwait and the Gulf, 1920-1970
    My project examines state formation in Kuwait and the Gulf between 1920 and 1970 through the lens of migration. As the oil industry generated unprecedented demand for labor and burgeoning nation-states circumscribed the sprawling networks of empire, a wave of migration transformed both state institutions and individual subjectivities across the Gulf. I examine how the seemingly flattening legal category of citizenship, quotidian bureaucratic procedure, and the consolidation of law within territorial boundaries reconfigured earlier identifications even as they produced new ones, transforming not only how states classified their subjects, but how people identified themselves. Drawing on primary sources in Arabic and Persian across multiple sites, the project contributes to debates on sovereignty, citizenship, state formation, and migration.

    Year
    2016
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alex Eric Hernandez

    Savage Liberties: A Social History of Theodicy

    Year
    2010
    University/Institution
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alex L. S. Street

    Testing, Testing, A, B, C: The Politics of Language and Civics Tests in Europe

    Year
    2007
    University/Institution
    University of California, Berkeley
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alex Lee

    Building Atop Sedimented Histories: South Korean Professional Migrants in Dubai

    Year
    2012
    University/Institution
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alexa Hagerty

    Gray Zones and White Slavery: Memory and Moral Ambiguity and Human Trafficking in Argentina

    Year
    2013
    University/Institution
    Stanford University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alexander Igor Olson

    Ruin and Representation: Bohemians in the San Francisco Bay Area, 1906

    Year
    2007
    University/Institution
    University of Michigan
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alexandria Ruble

    “Equal but not the Same”: Debates and Policies on Gender Equality in East and West Germany, 1945-1965

    Year
    2012
    University/Institution
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alexios Tsigkas

    A Commodity of a Certain Taste: An Ethnography of the Ceylon Tea Industry

    Year
    2013
    University/Institution
    New School
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees