• Adam Paul Bronson

    Democracy, Science, and Everyday Life: Science of Thought and Postwar Japan, 1946-1996

    Year
    2008
    University/Institution
    Columbia University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adam Tanner

    Different Approaches in Japan and the United States in the Multi-Billion Dollar Hidden Trade in Our Private Medical Data

    Year
    2014
    Fellowship/Grant
    Abe Fellowship for Journalists
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adam Thomas

    Racial Ambiguity and Citizenship in the Postemancipation British Caribbean and United States
    My work uncovers overlooked experiences of racially ambiguous people in the postemancipation British Caribbean and US. Scholars tend to define these societies as failed experiments in racially inclusive citizenship, but in doing so they rely on dichotomies like black/white, free/enslaved, and success/failure. I place racially ambiguous people in their frameworks. Instead of addressing those whose physical traits defied easy categorization--e.g. people of "mixed race" who "passed"--I analyze subjects whose "black" or "white" appearance came into conflict with typical racialized assumptions of normative behavior. For example, "black" Jamaicans who voted in favor of white landowners in local government were accused of disloyalty framed in terms of ambiguous identities: they were "black" men with "white hearts." I discuss four means by which ambiguity was created: transracial adoption, political participation, economic practices, and sexual habits. Subjects include former slaves adopted by white families, and their understanding of national belonging; black Jamaicans accused of acting white and excluded from an imagined exclusively black community for doing so; depictions of African Americans as "prosthetic" citizens in the postbellum US white "political body"; and white sectarian missionaries in the Caribbean and carpetbaggers (Northern officeholders in the US South); both were accused of racially impure sexual tendencies and relationships to property by white supremacists seeking to reclaim citizenship as exclusively white. I trace common vocabularies and experiences of ambiguity in both locations. In particular, I uncover a transnational conservative movement that opposed racial equality, and shared means and objectives of undermining its proponents. In its focus on racial ambiguity, the study adds to discussions about postemancipation societies, racial identity, black nationalism, and white supremacy, revealing more complex and contradictory pictures in each case.

    Year
    2013
    University/Institution
    University of California, Irvine
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adedamola O. Osinulu

    Venues of Transformation: Pentecostal Spaces in Lagos, Nigeria

    Year
    2009
    University/Institution
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adeem Suhail

    Dead Dreams and Boys with Pistols: Rethinking Urban Violence in Lyari Town, Pakistan
    Within the space of a decade, the township of Lyari transformed from a peaceful neighborhood known to be a bastion of working-class solidarity to an urban war-zone marked by violence between street gangs organized along ethnic lines. This study seeks to answer the question why. Hitherto, anthropological inquiry has either taken an 'objectivist' route that explains urban violence as a by-product of 'larger forces'; or a 'subjectivist' approach that highlights the lived experience of precarity. However, between the analytical binaries of global/local and space/place are people who constantly innovate and reorganize their lives in response to circumstances that are not of their own making. This research project explores a 'third way' between objectivist and subjectivist approaches. It tests the hypothesis that urban violence can be explained through a close study of the evolution of social organization. It further explores the merits of the claim that evolving social forms mediate between local actors and global forces and constitute the optimal analytic scale through which to understand the recurrent and ubiquitous phenomenon of urban violence in our times.

    Year
    2015
    University/Institution
    Emory University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adewale Michael Aderemi

    Oil and the Politics of Economic Development in Rentier States: Nigeria and Indonesia in Comparative Perspective 1966-1998

    Year
    2013
    Fellowship/Grant
    Next Generation Social Sciences in Africa: Doctoral Dissertation Completion Fellowship
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Aditi Saraf

    Invoking ‘Azaadi’: Practices of Freedom in Kashmir
    The movement for freedom from Indian rule, articulated as azaadi - the Urdu word for freedom - was launched in India-administered Kashmir in 1989, resulting in more than a decade of armed militancy and a brutal reprisal by the Indian state. At present, Hurriyat (G), the Islamist faction of the political front of Kashmiri separatists based in the capital city of Srinagar heads the freedom movement.While the demand for freedom from India is made transnationally intelligible as the political right to self-determination, in local publics and media it is also staked to the formation of a specifically Muslim political community towards which individual members must fulfill their ethical obligations. As the locus of ordinary social and economic activity, the marketplace becomes an important site for the implementation of separatist civil disobedience and protest activities, but the resultant loses suffered by the Kashmiri Muslim mercantile community amounts to billions of dollars. My research consists of an ethnographic focus on Kashmiri Muslim merchants in Srinagar to study the tensions they experience between the demands made on them in the struggle for political self-determination and the freedom to pursue their individual moral responsibilities as Muslims towards their families, livelihoods and religious duties.With this approach in mind, my research aims to shift the debate on the Kashmiri freedom movement from deliberative discourses and political rhetoric to the realm of everyday practices. I observe these practices as they arise within the ethos and sociality of the urban marketplace as a locally embedded public and a place of congregation and exchange. Finally, I take the merchant as the locus of a distinct Muslim ethico-political subjectivity, committed to both success in worldly pursuits and individual requital to God in the afterlife, in making inquiries into the exercise of freedom in Kashmir.

    Year
    2011
    University/Institution
    Johns Hopkins University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Admire Mare

    Makers or Breakers of Peace? An Analysis of the Role of the Zimbabwean Press in the Coverage of Political Violence during the 2008 Harmonised Elections

    Year
    2013
    Fellowship/Grant
    APN Individual Research Grants
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adole Raphael Audu

    Political Violenec and the Development of Nigeria:a study of Yobe State

    Year
    2014
    Fellowship/Grant
    Next Generation Social Sciences in Africa: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Fellowship
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adrian Favell

    Made in Translation: LA-Tokyo Mobility Networks and the Emergence of "Offshore" Japanese Cultural Industries in Art, Fashion and Food

    Year
    2005
    University/Institution
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Fellowship/Grant
    Abe Fellowship
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adrian L. Yen

    Psycho-pharmaceuticals and Traditional Medicine in Acholiland: Emerging Forms of Therapeutic Citizenship In Postwar Northern Uganda
    Today in the Acholi region of post-conflict northern Uganda, international peacebuilding initiatives intersect with national health reforms to make generic psychotropic drugs, like benzodiazepine—an anti-anxiety drug, an important part of the care that government hospitals and NGOs provide for one of the highest rates of “war-related” mental illness recorded in clinical history. The recent influx of psychotropic drugs raises questions about why and how these medicines are made available to affected Acholi as well as how different Acholi engage these biopsychiatric technologies as they grow to complement and compete with other popular forms of care. Underscoring the recent extension of these drugs within new trends of humanitarianism and understandings of citizenship, my project will examine contemporary encounters between Acholi and psychiatric medicines and how they unfold within larger assemblages of medical expertise, humanitarian aid, and traditional Acholi healing practices. Situated in Gulu district, the launch site of several major international mental health initiatives, I will investigate the social, political, and medical networks that constitute the region’s mental health care, focusing on how psychotropic drugs circulate through these networks, and how they shape the strategies by which different actors deal with the mental health crisis there. At stake is the question of the kind of person and community that is reconstituted through the heterogeneous practices and resources that an international concern for Acholi mental health assembles, and the relationship that is emerging between Acholi, the state, and NGO agencies, as psychotropic drugs come to mediate efforts to repair the social and psychic life of Acholi society.

    Year
    2012
    University/Institution
    University of California, Davis
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adrian Lerner Patron

    Jungle Cities: The Making of Urban Space in Twentieth-Century Amazonia
    The Amazon Rainforest became an urban region during the twentieth century. In Brazil and Peru, more than seventy percent of the almost 26 million inhabitants of Amazonia live in cities. My dissertation examines the environmental history of Manaus (Brazil) and Iquitos (Peru), the two largest and most important cities of Amazonia during the twentieth century. Drawing from local, regional and national archives, as well as from select interviews, I explore the relationships between the environmental conditions of the rainforest and the social and spatial inequalities that characterize Latin American cities. I analyze critical junctures marked by the confluence of four key urban environmental issues: 1) the history of land ownership, 2) the history of water management, 3) the history of public health, and 4) the history of crime. Massive urbanization radically transformed Amazonia by reshaping everyday life, local social structures, and human interactions with the environment. In the large popular neighborhoods at the edges of Iquitos and Manaus, urban informality created distinct social landscapes that challenged prevailing dichotomies between city and rainforest, between urban and rural, and between built environments and nature. Meanwhile, developmental policies and contingent political factors took Manaus and Iquitos to different paths. Ultimately, convergences of popular agency, environmental conditions, and the forces of state formation and capital shaped the making of urban spaces in Amazonia. Neither cultural nor environmental determinisms explain the divergences between the two jungle cities. Both comparative and transnational, the history of the urbanization of the planet's largest tropical rainforest speaks to larger debates about of the complex, changing, and multidirectional relationships between humans and their environments.

    Year
    2015
    University/Institution
    Yale University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adriana Chira

    Circulating Freedoms: Citizenship Rights and Political Activism around the Gulf of Mexico, 1868-1898
    During the Cuban War of Independence (1868-1898) and U.S. Reconstruction, U.S. and Cuban Afro-descendants transformed regional commercial networks and port cities on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, which had traditionally sustained Caribbean plantation economies, into an infrastructure for spreading radical interpretations of freedom and citizenship after slavery. My dissertation project examines the circulation of people and vernacular ideologies of race and citizenship between two societies transitioning from slavery to freedom. I hypothesize that, through labor unions, associational politics, and journalism, geographically mobile U.S. Reconstruction-era activists, along with Cuban journalists, artisans, union leaders, and anti-Spanish conspirators, collaboratively defined citizenship as membership of both national and trans-American communities of political belonging. As an idiosyncratic crossroads of French, Spanish, British, and U.S. political traditions and racial ideologies that mid-nineteenth century activist Afro-descendants drew upon, the Gulf’s revolutionary networks offer a case-study through which we can explore (1) the dynamic relationship between vernacular and formal-constitutional meanings of citizenship rights after the abolition of slavery; (2) the circulation of ideologies of rights across legal jurisdictions and political and cultural boundaries; and (3) the emergence of visions of diaspora in the Western Hemisphere. My research draws on rich, but underutilized primary sources located in U.S., Spanish, and Cuban archives, including notarial records, census data, embarkation and disembarkation records, journalism, personal and official correspondence, minutes of association meetings, consular reports, and judicial cases brought against alleged conspirators against the Spanish Crown.

    Year
    2012
    University/Institution
    University of Michigan
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adriana Valencia

    Migration and the City: Early-seventeenth century urban history in Granada, Valencia, Rabat, and Tetouan

    Year
    2005
    University/Institution
    University of California, Berkeley
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adrien P. Zakar

    On a Biplane: Aerial Photography and the Politics of Space in the Middle East (1895-1950)
    My dissertation examines the history of aerial photography in the Middle East through the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the rise of independent states in Syria under French mandate, Iraq under British rule and in the Republic of Turkey (1895-1950.) First, my project explores the social construction of this technology at a time when, upon the fall of the empire, aerial mapping became instrumental to the charting of former Ottoman territories. There, aerial photographs were able to capture the coexistence of sedentary, semi-nomadic and nomadic communities with an unprecedented clarity and the development of aerial mapping disseminated conceptions of human geography that enabled the classification this diverse population along sectarian lines. Therefore, I examine the history of aerial photography as the development of not only a visual device but also a historically contingent way of seeing that shaped the Middle East at this critical juncture in time. Second, my research follows aerial mapping in Syria, Iraq, and Turkey in order to trace the deployment of this new visual practice in policies aimed at obliterating Ottoman institutions. In Syria and Iraq under colonial occupation, I question whether these policies destroyed important contact-zones that were characteristic of the Ottoman Empire by confining various populations within designated geographical areas. Additionally, I examine the modernization of Ottoman cartography by the Republic of Turkey in light of nationalist narratives that embraced notions of human geography in order to classify the Anatolian population into new categories such as 'Turks' and 'mountain Turks.' By tracing connections among aerial photography, human geography, and the dismantling of the Ottoman polity, my dissertation unravels the technological and scientific history of sectarianism as way to shed new light on the transition from empire to nation-state in the Middle East.

    Year
    2014
    University/Institution
    Columbia University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adrien P. Zakar

    Provincial Commodities, Environmental Thinking and the Making of Nation States in the Middle East

    Year
    2013
    University/Institution
    Columbia University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Adrienne P. Dunn

    A Long Way From Home: African American Female Exodusters from the South to the West 1879-1900

    Year
    2011
    University/Institution
    Howard University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Agnes Sohn

    Urban-to-rural youth migration in South Korea: Youth cultural production at the periphery

    Year
    2015
    University/Institution
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Fellowship/Grant
    Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Ahilan Arasaratnam Kadirgamar

    Reconstruction and Dispossession: Landed Relations in Post-war Sri Lanka
    In May 2009, a three decade long civil war came to an end in Sri Lanka. Its war-torn areas are now under reconstruction; a process led by state infrastructure development. While the livelihoods of rural people of Jaffna, the war-torn, predominantly Tamil district in northern Sri Lanka, are mainly from agriculture, foreign remittances and the state sector also contribute to their household incomes. How is reconstruction shaping their relations to agriculture as a livelihood and land as a productive asset? What are the changes to labor, and how is that impacting class differentiation and caste stratification? This study will use both quantitative and qualitative approaches to analyze the sustainability of rural livelihoods in Jaffna. Through an analysis of rural livelihoods in war-torn Sri Lanka, it will address the dispossession of the peasantry, common to so many places in the global South going through armed conflicts, migration and rapid global integration.

    Year
    2012
    University/Institution
    City University of New York Graduate Center
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Ahilan Arasaratnam Kadirgamar

    Reconstruction and Dispossession: Landed Relations in Post-war Sri Lanka

    Year
    2014
    University/Institution
    City University of New York Graduate Center
    Fellowship/Grant
    AAS-SSRC Dissertation Workshop Series
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Ahmad Amara

    Echoes of Legal Pasts: Landed Property Relations in the Negev, 1858-1948
    My dissertation research aims to explore the interplay of geography and law in a relational way in the Negev, now part of Israel, under two different regimes: the late Ottoman, since the enactment of the Ottoman Land Code (1858-1917), and the British Mandatory (1917-1948). Looking at both the social and the material dimensions of geography and law, this project examines the frequent reconfigurations of land relations in the Negev over the century preceding 1948 and how land rights were defined and reshaped within a unique legal order that evolved through the dynamic interaction of state law and tribal customary law. This dynamic relationship was influenced by fluctuating notions of modernization, sovereignty, authority, as well as ongoing capitalist development, all of which impacted the land regime and had significant social repercussions. Focusing on this region's Bedouin-Arab population, my project draws on Ottoman, British, and Israeli archives, personal papers and interviews, to explore the system and evolution of landed property relations, in the context of a broader analysis of state-society relationships. My dissertation will examine how the shifting understandings and categorizations of specific legal, spatial, and social realities by governmental and social actors (including courts, judges, regional governors, tax and land registry staff, inhabitants, and local leaders) shaped the geographic and legal order in the Negev. My project's focus on land relations in the Negev since 1858 provides an excellent angle from which to investigate the legal orders of imperial, colonial, and post colonial regimes in this particular region, and challenges the neat distinctions often drawn between each political order. Further, the research challenges scholarly tendency to treat the legal history of modern Palestine as if each regime brought with it an entirely distinct legal system.

    Year
    2013
    University/Institution
    New York University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Ahmed Ali Ibrahim

    Authoritative Scriptural Interpreters: An Anthropology of Islam
    Shortly after the collapse of the central government in Somalia in 1990, there began to sprout up clan-based Islamic or Shari'a courts in southern Somalia. The courts began a process of centralization which culminated in the formation of the Islamic Courts Union (ICU) in 2004. By 2006 the ICU was in control of all of southern and central Somalia. An Ethiopian invasion of the country in December 2006 resulted in the disintegration of the ICU as a governing entity and a unified political movement. The Shari'a courts did not only represent different clans and sub-clans but also distinct schools of thought and theological positions within Islam in Somali society. This project will approach the emergence of the courts and their unification as an entry point to conduct a historical and ethnographic study of how local Islamic practice and orthodoxy is established. It will do so by focusing on the role and position of authoritative scriptural interpreters in the formation of the Shari'a courts and in today's Somali society. How do kinship and politico-economic conditions influence who and how scriptures are interpreted, understood, and lived? This project will provide the first in-depth and explicitly theoretical attempt to understand how local cultural and political factors interact with foundational Islamic scriptures in the establishment of local Islamic practice and orthodoxy. In so doing this project will engage with and contribute to the general literature on political Islam and specifically the anthropological debate on how to conceptualize in a single analytical framework the relationship between Islam as a universal religion and the diversity of specific local Islamic practices.

    Year
    2013
    University/Institution
    City University of New York Graduate Center
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Ahmed El Shamsy

    The Role of Legal Maxims in the Development of Islamic Law

    Year
    2006
    University/Institution
    Harvard University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Ahyoung Yoo

    To Be Two Places at Once: Technology, Globalization and Contemporary Korean Art

    Year
    2015
    University/Institution
    Ohio State University
    Fellowship/Grant
    Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Aidan A. H. Forth

    The Origins of the Camp: Violence and Humanity in the British Empire, 1830-1902
    Usually associated with the totalitarian regimes of the mid-twentieth century, concentration camps first appeared during the South African War (1899-1902). My project traces the development of the concentration camp in British imperial practice. By exploring the affinities between South African camps and earlier precursors, my project examines the evolving practices of encampment and the cultural mentalities that informed them. Metropolitan and colonial workhouses, military cantonments, arrangements for the control of infectious disease, and relief camps used to manage famine victims in late 19th-century South Asia provided an archive of imperial practice that informed the creation and management of camps in the South African War and beyond. In addition to tracing an evolving set of practices and policies, I argue that as a culturally embedded phenomenon, camps were the outcome of shifting mentalities of warfare, discipline, and the spatial organization of modern masses. Camps are now a ubiquitous feature of our contemporary geopolitical landscape. By locating the origins of the camp in liberal empire, I believe we can account for the continuing afterlife of the camp even after the demise of totalitarianism. My hypothesis is that British imperial agents were able to imprint the camp with a humanitarian pedigree that was mobilized to justify repressive measures throughout the twentieth century.

    Year
    2010
    University/Institution
    Stanford University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees