• Alexandra M. Stern

    Eugenics Beyond Borders: Science and Medicalization in Mexico and the United States West, 1900-1950

    Year
    1997
    University/Institution
    University of Chicago
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alexandre Pelletier

    The State and the Local Religious Fields: Explaining Variation in Islamic Militancy in Post-Suharto Indonesia

    Year
    2015
    University/Institution
    University of Toronto
    Fellowship/Grant
    AAS-SSRC Dissertation Workshop Series
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alexandria Ruble

    “Equal but not the Same”: Debates and Policies on Gender Equality in East and West Germany, 1945-1965

    Year
    2012
    University/Institution
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alexandru I. Vari

    Commercialized Modernities: A History of City Marketing and Urban Tourism Promotion in Paris and Budapest from the Nineteenth-Century to the Interwar Period

    Year
    2001
    University/Institution
    Brown University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alexios Tsigkas

    A Commodity of a Certain Taste: An Ethnography of the Ceylon Tea Industry

    Year
    2013
    University/Institution
    New School
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alexios Tsigkas

    A Commodity of a Certain Taste: An Ethnography of the Ceylon Tea Industry
    While studies have looked at "taste," its composition and social effects, in the context of the circulation and consumption of goods, this project seeks to locate taste within the production process of Sri Lanka's national commodity: Ceylon tea is a brand name of immense export value, of historical, financial and symbolic significance to the island. However, while tea enjoys growing global popularity, demand for the high quality but costly Ceylon brew is in decline. While individual stakeholders stand divided on how to address this conundrum, the industry persists in its longstanding practice of laboriously carving and safeguarding a niche-like brand identity around the so-called "purity" and "superior taste" of Ceylon tea, despite the fact that the latter remains a widely circulating, mass-produced commodity. This project theorizes taste as a value creating entity, the effects of which are central to the production of commodities, rather than solely to their consumption and in doing so rethinks the commodity form. Furthermore, it posits that the analytic of taste can enrich our knowledge and understanding of the Ceylon tea industry, and by extension contemporary capitalism and the location of Sri Lanka therein. At the same time, it interrogates the very nature of taste making itself as a labor of collaboration and negotiation between different groups of actors. Ethnographic research will integrate the various sites that comprise the Ceylon Tea industry as a whole while attending to the diverse individuals that animate them, extending a novel approach to the study of commodities as ethnographic objects. Fieldwork will be conducted within two tea estates, the Sri Lanka Tea Board, the Colombo Auction House, the Tea Research Institute, as well as a small number of export companies.

    Year
    2015
    University/Institution
    New School
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alfonso Salgado

    The Party Family: The Private Life of Communists in Twentieth-Century Chile
    The Party Family, the title of my doctoral dissertation, encapsulates the multiple layers of this research on communist activism in twentieth-century Chile. First and foremost, this is a study of communist families, their internal dynamics and their private practices. Second, it is an invitation to think of communist parties as extended families, with networks of solidarity and hierarchical relationships based on gender and age. Finally, it is an attempt to engage with, and speak to, the larger audience of scholars interested in what political scientists call the family of communist parties. The research spans from the mid-1930s to 1973 and is based on four types of sources: the communist press, oral histories, civil registry documents, and internal party documentation. By studying Chilean communist families in the long duration and through a diverse set of sources, my research delves into the interpenetration of the public and the private spheres in political activism. "The first duty of a militant," the statutes of the party asserted, "is to make the acts of his or her public and private life fit the principles and program of the party." A communist was not only supposed to be a good revolutionary in the street, but also the best spouse and parent at home. I believe that a study of this dimension of Chilean communism can help advance a more holistic definition of political activism. Focusing on armed insurgency and state repression, scholars of Latin America have aptly argued that politics was a matter of life and death. I put the emphasis on everyday activism at home rather than intermittent violence in the streets to rethink politics as an existential matter in the broadest sense. Although centered on a specific communist party, informed by sociological questions, and rooted in historical methods, my dissertation seeks to challenge our understanding of what constitutes both politics and human beings as political animals.

    Year
    2013
    University/Institution
    Columbia University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alfredo Rivera

    Re-Envisioning Cuba: Art, Architecture, and Visual Culture in Havana, 1955-1970

    Year
    2008
    University/Institution
    Duke University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Ali Atabey

    Crossing Borders in the Early Modern Mediterranean: Europeans in Seventeenth-century Ottoman Galata
    In 1617, Fatma Hatun, an ordinary Ottoman woman, agreed to pay a certain amount of money to the Venetian merchant Pavlo to save her son, a war captive imprisoned in Chios Island. Based on the lived experiences of Europeans, my work examines such instances of contact, interdependent relations, and the fluidity of social bonds between Europeans and Ottomans in 17th-century Galata, a commercial and diplomatic district of Istanbul. Merchants, diplomats, sailors, missionaries, and travelers acquired official documents guaranteeing the safety of their lives and property during their stay, thereby becoming muste'min, i. e. protected foreigners. As border-crossers, some of these "protected" Europeans served as intermediaries between the Ottoman state, its officials, and locals on the one hand, and the outside world on the other. Archival research will support my initial findings on cross-cultural and cross-religious interaction and, surprisingly, reveal the intermediary role of Europeans with the local people.

    Year
    2015
    University/Institution
    University of Arizona
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Ali Atabey

    Crossing Borders in the Early Modern Mediterranean: Europeans in Seventeenth-Century Ottoman Galata
    In 1617, Fatma Hatun, an ordinary Ottoman woman, agreed to pay a certain amount of money to the Venetian merchant Pavlo to save her son, a war captive imprisoned on Chios Island. This project takes as its subject the lived experiences of European merchants, diplomats, and travelers, such as Pavlo, in the seventeenth century Middle East. The focus is upon Istanbul, the seat of the Ottoman Empire, and particularly Galata, the main commercial and diplomatic district of the city where most Europeans resided. Merchants, diplomats, sailors, missionaries, and travelers acquired official documents guaranteeing the safety of their lives and property during their stay, thereby becoming muste'min, i.e. protected foreigners. Utilizing a diverse set of archival sources composed of legal court records, commercial records, consular reports, diplomatic correspondences, and personal writings from archives located in Istanbul, London, and Paris, this research demonstrates interdependent relations and the fluidity of social bonds between Europeans and local Ottoman subjects. Traditional historiography portrays a picture of conflict and difference. This dissertation seeks to problematize these conventional views of cultural binary oppositions such as East and West, Christian and Muslim, insider and outsider, and local and foreigner. Without underestimating the existence of conflict, it seeks to probe the assumed political, linguistic, and religious boundaries to reveal dense cross-cultural and cross-religious exchange, interdependence, and shared business networks between Europeans and Ottoman subjects, as well as the multifaceted identities of the early modern Mediterranean.

    Year
    2016
    University/Institution
    University of Arizona
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Ali N. Hamdan

    Exile, Place, and Politics: Syria's Transnational Civil War
    How does opposition adapt to exile during civil war? This question lies at the heart of the ongoing conflict in Syria, which began as a popular revolution in 2011 and has since evolved into a brutal war involving the authoritarian Asad regime and a shifting array of militias, states, civil society movements, and aid-organizations. This dissertation approaches the transnational politics of civil war by tracing ethnographically how networks of opposition adapt to exile in two places. It examines 1) the ties among various opposition factions (militant or otherwise); 2) the cross-border activities these relationships facilitate; and 3) the narratives and practices of legitimization that underpin them. Building on a combination of assemblage theory and geographer John Allen's theory of "topologies of power," this project works toward a more transnational conception of how "political order" emerges and adjusts in civil war. Five years of war and foreign intervention have transformed the political geography of Syria. In addition to the territorial fragmentation of the country and the disintegration of its border with Iraq, the Asad regime has made extensive use of barrel-bombs in rebel territory and in civilian areas especially. This deliberate tactic of urbicide (Coward 2007) has forced key opposition actors, institutions, and services into exile in neighboring countries where they can consolidate their activities. Chief among these are Turkey and Jordan. While this has enabled the Syrian opposition to survive, it has also forced it to adjust to a dramatically new political context and thus altered the larger rebel division of labor. Amman (in Jordan) and Gaziantep (in Turkey) in particular have emerged as key nodes or "exile-capitals" for Syrian opposition activity. Accordingly, this study explores how the challenges and opportunities of these contexts shape the ties, activities, and stories that the opposition develops in exile.

    Year
    2016
    University/Institution
    University of California, Los Angeles
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alice Brooke Wilson

    Interrogating Agricultural Sustainability: Food Sovereignty and the Defense of Maize in Central Mexico

    Year
    2008
    University/Institution
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alice SooJin Kim

    Airport Modern: The Space Between National Departures and Cosmopolitan Arrivals

    Year
    2008
    University/Institution
    University of California, Berkeley
    Fellowship/Grant
    Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alice Autumn Weinreb

    Nourishing Socialism: Food, Bodies, and the Building of a National Identity in Early Cold War East Germany

    Year
    2006
    University/Institution
    University of Michigan
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alice Roberta Wiemers

    Community and Climate Change in Northeastern Ghana: Local Authority and Natural Resource Management under Decentralization

    Year
    2008
    University/Institution
    Johns Hopkins University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alicia Dawn Gibson

    The End, or Life in the Atomic Age: Aesthetic Form and Modes of Subjectivity

    Year
    2009
    Fellowship/Grant
    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellowship
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alisa Eimen

    Negotiating Identity through Architecture in late 20th-Century Tehran

    Year
    2000
    University/Institution
    University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alison Brysk

    Global Good Samaritans: Human Security Promoters and Networks

    Year
    2005
    University/Institution
    University of California, Irvine
    Fellowship/Grant
    Abe Fellowship
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alison C. Cool

    Translating Twins: Twin Studies and the Production of Genetic Knowledge in the Swedish Welfare State

    Year
    2009
    University/Institution
    New York University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alison Kolodzy

    "Poles and Algerians in France: Gender, Identity, and Confessional Cultures in the 20th Century"

    Year
    2011
    University/Institution
    Michigan State University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alison Wetherfield

    Sexual Harassment of Working Women in Japan: Policy Options and Emerging Solutions

    Year
    1993
    University/Institution
    University of Tokyo
    Fellowship/Grant
    Abe Fellowship
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alix Riviere

    Bittersweet Childhoods: Slave Youth on Nineteenth-Century Sugar Plantations in Martinique and Louisiana
    My dissertation project examines the cultural and social experiences of enslaved children on sugar plantations in Martinique and Louisiana in the nineteenth century. My research argues that changing notions of childhood and the place of children in the family and society in the 18th and 19th century affected the lives of enslaved youth in the half-century before emancipation. This project shows that children were involved in all aspects of plantation society, even if in markedly different ways than their adult counterparts. Though not spared slavery's bitterness, the status of young slaves as children conferred them some privileges, notably more leisure time and less labor requirements than their adult counterparts. At the same time, children were less productive and less valuable than adults, and planters also refrained from investing in their health and well being. The central question guiding this project is: How did age inform slaves' multifaceted experiences of slavery? In other words, how did their status as children affect their workload, their access to free time, and their relations not only within their families and communities, but also with whites in and out of the plantation? In order to do so, I offer a socio-cultural analysis of slave children's experience by using 19th-century literary sources discussing children and the family in Europe and the United States but also in West Africa, to contextualize and understand the social experiences of slave children found in plantation records, judicial sources, and notarized documents.

    Year
    2016
    University/Institution
    Tulane University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Aliya Iqbal-Naqvi

    Abu'l Fazl: Creator of the Akbarian Idea

    Year
    2009
    University/Institution
    Harvard University
    Fellowship/Grant
    International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alka Menon

    Ethnic Cosmetic Surgery and the Biotech Body in Multiethnic Societies

    Year
    2014
    University/Institution
    Northwestern University
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees
  • Alla Chernenko

    Acculturation and Health in Immigrant Enclaves: A Mixed-Method Examination
    That acculturation has negative effect on health of immigrants living in the U.S. is a widespread notion in the immigrant health research. However, as acculturation is a notoriously complex concept, existing studies often fail to capture certain factors that can potentially alter the course of acculturation and its effects on health. One of such factors is place of residence: acculturation likely affects health differently depending on where the immigrants settle post-migration. In this study I will explore spatial contexts of acculturation and health by comparing health outcomes and health trajectories of those living in immigrant enclaves to the health outcomes of immigrants living in neighborhoods where only a small proportion of residents were born outside of the United States. Thus, I intend to answer the questions of how and why do the effects of acculturation on health differ for residents of immigrant enclaves vs. immigrants living in non-enclave communities?.

    Year
    2016
    Fellowship/Grant
    DPDF Student Fellowship Competition
    Fellows & Grantees