• 1.A Portrait of California 2014–2015

    California Human Development Report.

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  • 2.AIDS, Security and Conflict Research Hub

    The AIDS, Security and Conflict Research Hub is a portal for the latest work on the areas covered by the SSRC's AIDS, Security and Conflict Initiative (ASCI): HIV/AIDS in uniformed services; HIV/AIDS, humanitarian crises, and post-conflict transitions; HIV/AIDS and fragile states; and gender and cross-cutting issues. The site is home to the Resource Database, a community-editable "field mapping" tool for collecting data on people, institutions, and resources in the fields of HIV/AIDS, security, and conflict. Go to the hub front page.

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  • 3.Abe Fellowship Program

    Supporting US- and Japan-based researchers focusing on contemporary issues.

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  • 4.African Peacebuilding Network

    Supporting independent African research and its integration into regional and global policy communities.

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  • 5.Anxieties of Democracy

    How can representative democracies be strengthened to govern more effectively? The SSRC’s Anxieties of Democracy program is motivated by a concern about whether the core institutions of established democracies—elections, mass media, political parties, interest groups, social movements, and, especially, legislatures—can capably address large problems in the public interest. Though emphasis will be placed on “anxieties of democracy” in the United States, the program will also work comparatively and conceptually across the globe. The Anxieties of Democracy program is a major new initiative for the Council. It was developed through a set of convenings of leading thinkers from a range of fields. These early contributions have been gathered in a budding digital forum: The Democracy Papers. Our ambitions are diagnostic (to identify causes of perceived “anxieties” about representative democracies) and prescriptive (to explore solutions). To these ends, we intend to mobilize existing research; promote new studies; publish and disseminate findings; forge pathways to bring this knowledge to policy, media, and public audiences; and provide opportunities for new generations of social scientists to address how to make democracies govern more effectively. With core support from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and additional funding from the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the program is overseen by an Advisory Committee and key staff who frame its agendas, organize seminars and conferences, generate publications, and connect with relevant audiences. The program’s first phase of activities is organized around five working groups. There are two core groups—one with a broad focus on democratic institutions and another on the challenge of citizen access to democratic institutions, understood as “participation.” Three policy-oriented working groups will, in turn, address the potential of representative democracies to contend with the tests posed by climate change, state security, and what we are calling “the politics of distribution.”   For news and announcements about the Anxieties of Democracy program's activities, please click here: @SSRCdemocracy.    .

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  • 6.CEHI Web-Based Resources

    …[中文]The Resource Hub is an online, bilingual searchable database housing information about individuals and institutions working on environment and health issues in China, and relevant literature. Selected information on experience with environment and health issues overseas is also included. All information items are linked so that readers can easily trace information. Created in 2007, the Hub now includes over 3,500 items in English and Chinese. It provides a convenient way for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners in the field to access the relevant literature and identify partners for collaboration.   The FORHEAD website includes not only information about network events but also special features introducing new research on particular environment and health issues from across the disciplines, relevant conceptual and methodological tools, and international experience. These materials offer a flexible resource for educational institutions, government agencies and NGOs, who can download packages of information tailored to their needs for trainings, outreach, or other activities. .

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  • 7.CGP-SSRC Policy Forum

    A project of the Abe Fellowship Program, the CGP-SSRC Policy Forum draws on the expertise and competencies of both the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP) and the Social Science Research Council. The CGP-SSRC Policy Forums bring together academics, practitioners, policy actors, and journalists to work toward the goal of long-term, policy-oriented solutions to issues of global public consequence and to develop networks that will lessen the gaps between research, policy, and practice. Each forum focuses on a single broad theme over a two-year period, which allows for sustained interaction among forum participants as well as a variety of outputs targeted to important moments in the real-world policy debate. The CGP-SSRC Policy Forum, designed to bring essential knowledge to relevant publics at critical junctures, follows on a core belief of the SSRC that social science can produce necessary knowledge—necessary for citizens to understand their societies and necessary for policymakers to decide crucial questions. Themes are relevant to the current Abe Fellowship Program priority areas of 1) traditional and nontraditional approaches to security and diplomacy, 2) global and regional economic issues, and 3) social and cultural issues. Implicit in any CGP-SSRC Policy Forum is an examination of how the US-Japan relationship and bilateral cooperation can contribute to the goals of the forum. The inaugural Policy Forum was held from 2009 to 2012 with the goal of elucidating environmental challenges and offering policy recommendations and best practices related to energy saving and the reduction of air pollution and CO2 emissions within a city-level framework. Rather than seeking to impact national-level policies, the forum worked for change at the local level by engaging local-level policy actors and officials from second- and third-tier cities in Asia in an exploration of lessons learned and major challenges. In a series of meetings held over three years in Tokyo, Japan, a core group of academics and practitioners engaged in a sustained dialogue with each other and experts and leaders from cities in Asia to consider best practices and offer policy recommendations related to energy saving and the reduction of CO2 emissions within a city-level framework. One of the primary goals of the forum was to develop a package of resources available to the public long after its conclusion. Five case studies were developed by forum participants, one case for each of five sectors typically under control of city-level governments:  Green Buildings: US/Japanese Building Energy Efficiency Measures and Their Applicability to Southeast Asia, by Rob Knapp Jr. (Physics and Sustainable Design, Evergreen State University), Hiroto Takaguchi (Architecture, Waseda University), and Satoshi Washiya (Waseda University). Waste Management: Comparative 3R Initiatives in Asia, by Kohei Watanabe (Sociology, Teikyo University). Transportation: Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), by Alan Miller (Climate Business Groups, International Finance Corporation). Industrial Energy Use Management: Adoption of Eco Action 21 in Japan and Its Applicability to Other Asian Countries, by Yoshika Yamamoto (Management and Information Science, Setsunan University). Land Use Planning: Urban Green Infrastructure, by Akito Murayama (Environmental Studies, Nagoya University). These cases formed a package of concrete best practices that can be implemented separately or together. When implemented together the package forms the basis for a model, “greener” Asian city. The Policy Forum on the Environment and Climate Change involved 46 active participants, including six Abe Fellows, two committee members, and 38 invited participants ranging from experts on issues of climate change to city-level representatives from Yangon, Myanmar; Vientiane, Lao PDR; Kathmandu, Nepal; Beijing, PRC; Kuching North, Malaysia; Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Dhaka, Bangladesh; Danang, Vietnam; and Makati, Philippines. Ongoing relationships have continued with both Danang, Vietnam, and Y…

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  • 8.CLA Longitudinal Study

    The CLA Longitudinal Study emerged from the Social Science Research Council’s collaborative partnership with the Pathways for College Network, with technical assistance in data collection provided by the Council for Aid to Education. The project has followed over 2,300 students at 24 institutions over time to examine factors affecting learning in higher education along the dimensions of critical thinking, complex reasoning, and written communication as measured by the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA). In the first two phases of the study, we examined student learning data for all four years of college, which were discussed in Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses (University of Chicago Press, 2011) and the policy report Improving Undergraduate Learning: Findings and Policy Recommendations from the SSRC-CLA Longitudinal Project (2011). The third phase of the project extends our analysis of student learning to post-college transitions two years out of college to illuminate how various factors influence life course outcomes. Initial findings were discussed in the report Documenting Uncertain Times: Post-graduate Transitions of the Academically Adrift Cohort (2012). Aspiring Adults Adrift: Tentative Transitions of College Graduates (University of Chicago Press, 2014) is a book based on phases 2 and 3 of the project. For more information, please visit highered.ssrc.org.

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  • 9.CPPF Activites: Europe/Caucasus/Middle East

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  • 10.CPPF Activities: Africa

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  • 11.CPPF Activities: Asia and the Pacific

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  • 12.CPPF Activities: Latin America and the Caribbean

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  • 13.CPPF Activities: Special Projects

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  • 14.CPPF Activities: Thematic

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  • 15.Central Africa Policy Forum (CAPF)

    Facilitating informal information sharing between the UN, diplomatic missions, and the NGO community.

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  • 16.Children of Immigrants in Schools

    The Education and Migration project is coordinating a three-year research and fellowship initiative investigating the role of educational institutions and policy in the integration of children of immigrants. Under the leadership of sociologist Richard Alba of SUNY-Albany, we have assembled five bi-national (American and European) teams, staffed with senior principal investigators and research fellows (pre- and postdocs) from both the United States and the European country under comparison: School funding and tracking in New York City, USA, and Amsterdam, Holland. Navigating borders in schools and communities in California and Catalonia, Spain. The impact of timing, differentiation, and second chances in the United States and Great Britain. Promising schooling practices for immigrant children in the United States and Sweden. The transition to the labor market for Mexicans in the United States and North Africans in France.   More detailed information can be found on the project's website or by downloading the flyer on the right.

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  • 17.China Environment and Health Initiative

    Generating new research on the connection between health, environment, and development in China.

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  • 18.China, Africa, and the UN

    Mapping the evolving relationships between China, Africa, and the United Nations.

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  • 19.Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum (CPPF)

    Mobilizing necessary knowledge to support UN capacity for conflict prevention, peacemaking and peacebuilding.

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  • 20.Cuba Program

    Facilitating information flows between Cuban scholars and their counterparts abroad.

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  • 21.DATA2GO.NYC

    Interactive Tool to Map Human Need and Well-Being in the New York Metro Area.

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  • 22.Digital Culture

    Exploring the intersections of technology, knowledge, and culture in a digital age.

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  • 23.Digital Literacy Initiative

    New modes of research and scholarly communication are changing the ways in which social scientists engage with, share, and evaluate scholarship.  From data analytics to geospatial and temporal visualization, computational modeling to social network analysis, these methods all demand increased attention to procedural thinking, critical engagement with the tools that shape knowledge production, and a stronger awareness of how to integrate digital methods with field-specific knowledge.  The Digital Culture program is working across the Council to foster greater digital capacity across all our programs through a new Digital Literacy Initiative. By building out online spaces for cohorts of Council fellows and providing them with training resources and a better understanding of available tools, we are instilling a digital literacy in a new generation of scholars so that they can use computational approaches when appropriate to their own research and, importantly, cultivate new cultures of scholarly exchange and evaluation. Currently, the Digital Literacy Initiative is developing new opportunities for students engaged in our various fellowship programs (DPDF Student Fellowships, Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellowships, and SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program). These initial offerings take a variety of forms—from in-person instruction to remote, self-directed learning—in order to explore the best ways to reach geographically-dispersed students studying a range of disciplines.   See below for details about activities, including open applications for travel bursaries to training workshops and conferences on digital scholarship and a resource section with links to training opportunities, useful tools, and other resources. Open Opportunities SSRC Digital Literacy Initiative: Application for Travel Bursaries to Purdue Symposium As part of a set of efforts to expand access to digital methods and approaches to scholarship, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) invites applications from graduate student fellows for travel bursaries to attend Purdue University’s 30th Symposium on African American Culture and Philosophy, “Exploring the ‘Humanity’ in the Digital Humanities: Africana/Black Studies’ Perspectives on the Digital Humanities.” The symposium will take place from December 1 to 3, 2016, with a pre-symposium for SSRC fellows starting on November 30. The SSRC will provide reimbursements of up to $900 per person for participation in the symposium and pre-symposium Eligibility: PhD students that are part of the SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program or have received fellowships from the Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship (DPDF) Program or International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF) Program are eligible to apply for this conference bursary. Deadline: Applications are due on August 1, 2016. Other Active or Recent Activities The Digital Literacy Initiative and the Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship (DPDF) Program recently hosted Trevor Muñoz, Assistant Dean for Digital Humanities Research at the University of Maryland Libraries and an Associate Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), for the DPDF Annual Spring Workshop. Muñoz ran a training session on data curation and management. Resources The Programming Historian “offers novice-friendly, peer-reviewed tutorials that help humanists learn a wide range of digital tools, techniques, and workflows to facilitate their research.”  Miriam Posner’s How Did They Make That? highlights possible digital scholarship projects and explains the tools and methods used to create them.  See more at YouTube,  DHCommons. CUNY’s Digital Humanities Resource Guide DIRT: Digital Research Tools Digital Humanities Summer Institute brings scholars, artists, librarians, and archivists together every summer to share ideas and methods and develop expertise in using advanced technologies. The National Endowment for the Humanities’ Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Human…

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  • 24.Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship (DPDF) Program

    Supporting the development of innovative dissertation proposals in the humanities and social sciences.

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  • 25.Drugs, Security and Democracy Program

    Supporting research in Latin America and the Caribbean to inform drug policy.

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