• 51.JSTOR-Democracy prototype

    The Anxieties of Democracy program is collaborating with the ITHAKA Labs team at JSTOR, the eminent digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources, to create a working prototype of a digital tool for social scientists studying democratic institutions and political participation. Currently in active development following a “design jam” organized at Harvard in collaboration with Dataverse, this “workbench” will be an online, searchable hub of scholarly research on the topic of democracy. By helping to facilitate its creation, the Anxieties of Democracy program seeks to make quality social science research more accessible to democracy scholars of all ages and backgrounds. For news and announcements about this project and other Anxieties of Democracy program activities, please click here: @SSRCdemocracy.

    Programs & Projects
  • 52.Justice and Security Research Program (JSRP)

    The SSRC has partnered with the London School of Economics (LSE) on a UK Department for International Development–supported research consortium on justice and security in fragile and conflict-affected situations. The global research program involves a consortium of partners from around the world, including the SSRC, the Conflict Research Group at Ghent University, the World Peace Foundation at Tufts University, the Global Consortium on Security Transformation, the South-East European Research Network, and the Video Journalism Movement. It aims to reframe and inform understanding and policymaking about issues relating to the political marketplace, border spaces and citizenship, social exclusion, and gender in states affected by conflict. Over the next five years, the JSRP will generate primary evidence about the informal institutions that govern the lives of people in a range of fragile or war-affected locations. Our focus is on understanding the relationship between ‘official’ and ‘hybrid’ governance structures to find out what arrangements best benefit those at the receiving end of policies to support justice and security. Fieldwork is already underway in the border zones of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Central African Republic (CAR), South Sudan, and Uganda. The consortium is working with a network of local researchers from the region, and in April 2013, the Social Science Research Council hosted a workshop for this network at the Centre d'Etudes Pour l'Action Sociale (CEPAS) in Kinshasa, DRC. This served as an opportunity to build the capacity of local researchers, as the workshop included trainings on research ethics, the practical dilemmas of fieldwork, and how to connect academic research to policy processes. The consortium is led by a Senior Management Team, which comprises of four research directors: the SSRC's Tatiana Carayannis, Alex de Waal (Tufts University), Tim Allen (London School of Economics), Koen Vlassenroot (Ghent University) and CEO Mary Kaldor (London School of Economics). Carayannis also leads on the Western DRC fieldwork and co-leads the CAR portfolio with Koen Vlassenroot. For more information and the full list of publications, please see the JSRP website.

    Programs & Projects
  • 53.Kujenga Amani

    Exchanging ideas and information on peacebuilding in Africa.

    Programs & Projects
  • 54.Mapping the Measure of America

    Measure of America builds data tools to understand well-being and opportunity in America.

    Programs & Projects
  • 55.Measure of America

    Tracking how America is doing from the perspective of human development.

    Programs & Projects
  • 56.Measuring College Learning Project

    The quality of undergraduate education has become a central question in academic and policy circles in recent decades. But how do we define quality? And how can we measure it? While many actors in the higher education arena are grappling with these issues, we believe it is crucial for faculty to be a leading voice in the quality conversation. The SSRC’s Measuring College Learning project, with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Teagle Foundation, brings faculty into the quality conversation by engaging them in consensus-driven discussions about learning outcomes and assessment in higher education. MCL builds on decades of prior work by the higher education community, including efforts to develop guidelines for general learning outcomes. These efforts have led to the creation of a range of tools that faculty can use to measure students’ general skills, such as critical thinking, complex reasoning, and problem solving. However, as beneficial as these resources are, they do not cover the full scope of learning in higher education. The next step in this process, and the main focus of MCL, is to concentrate on developing 21st century tools to measure field-specific learning. Since December 2013, MCL has been bringing panels of faculty together from six fields of study (biology, business, communication, economics, history, and sociology) to identify the essential 21st century competencies, conceptual knowledge, and practices that students in their fields should develop in college, in the introductory course as well as the major. Rather than striving to produce exhaustive or comprehensive lists of learning outcomes for these fields, the project aims to help faculty develop consensus around a limited set of empirically measurable “essential competencies and concepts” that reflect their top priorities for student learning. The faculty are also discussing the current status and future direction of assessment in their field. Pairs of faculty from each field are authoring a white paper synthesizing and expanding upon the work of these panels, which will be made publicly available in early 2016. It is our hope that this project, through its white papers on learning outcomes and assessment as well as a range of outreach efforts, will spark fruitful department and field-level discussions in each of the six MCL fields. In addition, we are in the early stages of conceptualizing a demonstration project that would focus on one of the fields. In this endeavor, we would partner with one or more assessment firms to develop a new faculty-informed field-specific instrument and field test it alongside existing instruments of generic collegiate skills and measures of instructional practices. The goal of the demonstration project would be to pilot test the new instrument as well as to examine the relationship between subject-specific skills, general collegiate skills, and instructional practices. Improving our understanding of these relationships is crucial in order to craft a sound agenda for using assessment to improve the quality of higher education. Improving the landscape of assessment in higher education is a significant undertaking, and one that must be approached thoughtfully and deliberately. To this end, MCL is dedicated to the following core principles: Faculty should be at the center of defining and developing transparent learning outcome standards for undergraduates. Students from all backgrounds and institutions should be given a fair opportunity to demonstrate their skills when transferring from one institution to another and when transitioning into the workforce. Measures of student learning should be rigorous and high-quality and should yield data that allow for comparisons over time and between institutions. Assessment tools should be used by institutions on a voluntary basis. Any single measure of student learning should be part of a larger holistic assessment plan. For more information and updates about the Measuring College Learning project, visit highered…

    Programs & Projects
  • 57.Mellon Mays Dissertation Writing Retreat

    The Dissertation Writing Retreat brings together 12 to 15 advanced graduate student fellows for five days of independent work on the dissertation project. It makes a support network available to each fellow and creates a structure for accountability to colleagues that directly reflects best practices learned from fellows who successfully completed the dissertation in varying circumstances. Open to fellows in the sixth year of graduate school and beyond who are within 12 months of completing their dissertations Not open to fellows that have already participated in the Preparing for the Professoriate seminar Consists of five days of intensive writing Largely self-directed, but facilitated by a Mellon Ph.D. Focuses on honing time management skills, developing a calendar for writing, and creating a structure for accountability Does not include discipline-based feedback or peer review Participants create an individual 12-month work plan and communicate regularly with each other after the Retreat The 2016 Dissertation Writing Retreat will be held from July 6 to 11 in Philadelphia, PA, in conjunction with PWDDS. Watch the video below to find out more about the Dissertation Writing Retreat!.

    Programs & Projects
  • 58.Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program

    Addressing underrepresentation among college and university faculties.

    Programs & Projects
  • 59.Mellon Mays Graduate Student Summer Conference

    The Summer Conference is the flagship component of the SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program. Targeted towards graduate students in years one through three, it provides a forum for skills exchange, cohort-building, and the development of professional proficiencies such as maximizing research resources. Open to graduating seniors accepted into a doctoral program and graduate students in years one through three Fellows may attend twice Provides the tools and skills for managing the early years of graduate school Includes panel presentations of fellows’ research, thematic workshops, presentations by senior scholars, and other activities that expose early-stage graduate students to a broad range of institutional and intellectual issues Advanced graduate student fellows and Mellon Ph.D.s serve as workshop leaders, panel discussants, and moderators The 2016 Annual Graduate Student Summer Conference will be held from June 21 to 23 at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, PA.

    Programs & Projects
  • 60.Mellon Mays Postdoctoral Fellows Retreat

    The Postdoctoral Fellows Retreat is held in odd-numbered years and brings together Mellon Ph.D.s for three days. Fellows exchange ideas, update networks, and engage the key issues and challenges they face as junior faculty—teaching, research, publication and the tenure process—as well as making the transition from the professoriate to administration and other roles within institutions. Open to fellows who have completed the doctorate Provides an opportunity to revive and solidify relationships with colleagues and mentors, reflect upon their journey towards the Ph.D., expand professional networks, and recommit to the Mellon Mays mission Focuses on teaching, research, publication and funding The 2015 Postdoctoral Fellows Retreat was held from July 11 to 13 in Charlotte, NC.

    Programs & Projects
  • 61.Mellon Mays Proposal Writing and Dissertation Development Seminar

    The Proposal Writing and Dissertation Development Seminar (PWDDS) addresses common concerns arising in the process of preparing the dissertation proposal, and in writing the dissertation itself. Has two tracks running in parallel: Proposal Writing track: For pre-dissertation fellows working on the research proposal Dissertation Development track: For advanced fellows focusing on the body of the dissertation, with the majority of data collection complete Fellows may attend once in the third through sixth year of graduate school, attending either the proposal writing or the dissertation development track Includes a considerable amount of time for individual writing, small group sessions, peer reviews, and one-on-one consultations with Mellon faculty mentors Provides an ideal setting in which to receive collegial critique and feedback The 2016 PWDDS will be held from July 6 to 11 in Philadelphia, PA, in conjunction with the Dissertation Writing Retreat. Watch the videos below to find out more about the Proposal Writing and Dissertation Development tracks!.

    Programs & Projects
  • 62.Mellon Mays Regional Lecture Series

    In addition to supporting our fellows through various stages of the doctorate, the Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program aspires to foster and strengthen relationships among all members of the Mellon Mays community. To that end, the Regional Lecture Series brings together undergraduates, graduate students, coordinators, and faculty in each region for intellectual engagement and community-building. Each lecture allows a Mellon Ph.D. the opportunity to speak on their research or a current topic, and fellows and coordinators gather afterwards for a reception. To date, lectures have taken place in New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, San Francisco, Boston, Los Angeles, Baltimore, and Atlanta. We were honored to have the following speakers join us on April 6, 2016: Boston: The Boston lecture was given by Dr. Zine Magubane, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston College. Dr. Magubane’s talk was titled: “Darkness Made Visible:  How the ‘Racial Ontology’ of Sociology’s Past Holds the Key to Sociology ‘Global’ Future.” Dr. Magubane and the Wellesley MMUF fellows.   Chicago: The Chicago lecture was given by Dr. Jonathan Rosa, Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University. Dr. Rosa’s talk was titled: “Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: A Semiotics of Racial and Linguistic Profiling.”.

    Programs & Projects
  • 63.Mellon Mays Seminar on Preparing for the Professoriate

    The Preparing for the Professoriate seminar is for fellows entering the academic job market. The seminar gives fellows the skills they need to secure and negotiate their first faculty appointments successfully. Open to fellows who have completed, or are close to completing the dissertation* Provides the tools and skills that fellows need to navigate the academic job market Simulates the job search process Includes sessions with Mellon Ph.D.s who discuss a variety of issues, including the CV, job application, job talk, postdoctoral fellowships, defining one’s academic identity, and finding the proper fit Allows fellows to receive a level of attention far beyond what is offered by institutional workshops * This seminar is targeted at fellows that have completed or are close to completing their dissertations. For this reason, fellows that participate in the Preparing for the Professoriate seminar are not eligible to attend PWDDS or DWR, or apply to the Dissertation Completion Grant, after they have completed this seminar. The 2016 Preparing for the Professoriate seminar will be held from September 22 to 24 in Minneapolis, MN.

    Programs & Projects
  • 64.Middle East and North Africa Program

    Generating new social science perspectives on the Middle East and North Africa.

    Programs & Projects
  • 65.Migration and Cuba

    The Council is working with the migration centers of the University of Havana to assess the current state of research on migration in Cuba and to put forth agendas for research during the coming years. Central to this project will be facilitating, in modest ways, the incorporation of Cuban specialists into the international professional networks from which they have long been excluded while attracting the interest of foreign institutions and individuals to work in Cuba for the first time. Another core objective is strengthening the capacity of Cuban institutions to collaborate with one another.

    Programs & Projects
  • 66.Migration and Development Within and Across Borders: Research and Policy Perspectives on Internal and International Migration

    In order to improve understandings of the similarities, differences, and connections between internal and international migration and their impacts on development, scholars and practitioners expert on these issues within Asia, Latin America, Africa, and North America convened in November 2005 in New York City.  This path breaking collection of selected and revised essays was first published by the International Organization on Migration, which has generously agreed to our making them available here as well as at the IOM website (http://www.iom.int). This project was supported by the International Organization on Migration, the Economic and Social Research Council, and the Center on Migration and Policy and Society. To download the individual chapters or the book in its entirety, go to: Across Borders Online Forum.

    Programs & Projects
  • 67.Migration and Education

    Migrants and their children now constitute more than half of the student body in many urban schools and post-secondary educational institutions in Canada, Europe, and the United States--a situation that challenges traditional approaches to preparing young people for employment and citizenship. The SSRC's Migration Program has initiated and collaborated in several major studies of the educational needs of immigrant and second generation students, along with institutional responses to those needs. Our activities have included convening working groups of experts from various backgrounds to review existing research and make recommendations; giving out fellowships to support further study; and producing edited volumes, journal articles, and other scholarly publications.

    Programs & Projects
  • 68.Migration and Religion

    Because the study of migration and the study of religion have developed separately, we know very little about their interrelationships. The SSRC Migration Program brings together scholars from both fields to explore how religion and settlement in new societies have affected the lives of migrants, both historically and in the present, both in the United States and in other parts of the world.

    Programs & Projects
  • 69.Migration and Security

    In the wake of September 11, 2001, the SSRC Migration Program convened a consultative committee on rethinking the challenges of migration and security. The committee organized a series of dialogues between representatives of U.S. government law enforcement agencies and of Muslim religious and community leaders to identify best practices for collaboration in insuring national security and civil rights. A June 2008 conference in London compared American practices with those in Great Britain, France, and Germany. Each meeting produced a report aimed at improving law enforcement-community relations.

    Programs & Projects
  • 70.NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security

    The NGO Working Group’s mission is to collaborate with the United Nations, its Member States and civil society towards full implementation of SCR 1325 and all other Security Council resolutions that address women, peace and security, including ensuring the equal and full participation of women in issues relating to peace and security. Using SCR 1325 as our guiding instrument, the NGO Working Group promotes a gender perspective and respect for human rights in all peace and security, conflict prevention and management and peacebuilding initiatives of the United Nations. The NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, via its strategic positioning in New York at United Nations headquarters, plays an important global role in monitoring policy and practice on women, peace and security. Together with its growing network of gender and security experts, the coalition has built a constituency of women, peace and security advocates among UN Member States, high-level UN decision makers, and civil society working on peacebuilding initiatives at the national and local levels. For more information, visit: www.womenpeacesecurity.org.

    Programs & Projects
  • 71.Next Generation Social Sciences in Africa

    Supporting the next generation of African researchers working on peace, security and development.

    Programs & Projects
  • 72.Next Generation Social Sciences: How and Where We Work

    The Next Generation Social Sciences program model responds to an emerging dilemma within higher education in the global South caused by the extraordinary emphasis on increasing undergraduate enrollment without proportionate investment in faculty development—a situation that erodes the ability of universities to produce the next generation of researchers, leaders, and practitioners. The program operates to strengthen tertiary education by creating a pipeline for the development of faculty members and research communities. For more information about the Next Generation Social Sciences model and an introduction to our Africa fellows and their work, please visit http://nextgen.ssrc.org/.

    Programs & Projects
  • 73.Northeast Asia Cooperative Security Project

    Contributing to conflict resolution in Northeast Asia.

    Programs & Projects
  • 74.Producing Knowledge on World Regions

    Despite broad consensus among higher education leaders that US universities are undergoing a process of "globalization," there is little agreement about just what globalization means, what propels it, or what intellectual, political, and ethical consequences it will bring for American higher education. The Council’s project Producing Knowledge on World Regions seeks to develop an intellectual framework and a social science agenda for assessing the globalization of higher education as well as the relationships between American universities, specific world regions, and an increasingly interconnected global higher education universe. The project is based on findings that continue to emerge from a large-scale comparative ethnography of area studies centers funded by the US Department of Education (2004–2010) examining how American universities in general, and federally funded National Resource Centers (NRCs) in particular, organize research and instruction on several adjacent world regions: the Middle East, Russia/Eurasia, and South Asia. The first phase of the project focused primarily on Middle East studies centers on US campuses, with a special focus on the role of these centers in promoting interdisciplinarity and internationalization in the field. A report on phase 1 can be found here. The project's second phase focused on NRCs for the Middle East, Russia/Eurasia, and South Asia in order to capture interconnections and geographies that fall between area studies definitions (including Central Asia, the Persian Gulf region, and the Indian Ocean). Complementing other InterAsia Program activities, this project engages with a number of pressing international education issues, including how universities carry out initiatives of internationalization and globalization, the place of the study of the international (as international studies, area studies, or interdisciplinary comparative work) within these schemes, and how universities, as organizations, grapple with the complexity of a world in which state borders are increasingly porous.

    Programs & Projects
  • 75.Religion and the Public Sphere

    Advancing and mobilizing new knowledge about religion, secularism, and public life.

    Programs & Projects