• 76.Producing Knowledge on World Regions

    Despite broad consensus among higher education leaders that US universities are undergoing a process of "globalization," there is little agreement about just what globalization means, what propels it, or what intellectual, political, and ethical consequences it will bring for American higher education. The Council’s project Producing Knowledge on World Regions seeks to develop an intellectual framework and a social science agenda for assessing the globalization of higher education as well as the relationships between American universities, specific world regions, and an increasingly interconnected global higher education universe. The project is based on findings that continue to emerge from a large-scale comparative ethnography of area studies centers funded by the US Department of Education (2004–2010) examining how American universities in general, and federally funded National Resource Centers (NRCs) in particular, organize research and instruction on several adjacent world regions: the Middle East, Russia/Eurasia, and South Asia. The first phase of the project focused primarily on Middle East studies centers on US campuses, with a special focus on the role of these centers in promoting interdisciplinarity and internationalization in the field. A report on phase 1 can be found here. The project's second phase focused on NRCs for the Middle East, Russia/Eurasia, and South Asia in order to capture interconnections and geographies that fall between area studies definitions (including Central Asia, the Persian Gulf region, and the Indian Ocean). Complementing other InterAsia Program activities, this project engages with a number of pressing international education issues, including how universities carry out initiatives of internationalization and globalization, the place of the study of the international (as international studies, area studies, or interdisciplinary comparative work) within these schemes, and how universities, as organizations, grapple with the complexity of a world in which state borders are increasingly porous.

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  • 77.Religion and the Public Sphere

    Advancing and mobilizing new knowledge about religion, secularism, and public life.

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  • 78.Reverberations

    Reverberations is a digital project of the Social Science Research Council’s program on Religion and the Public Sphere and its New Directions in the Study of Prayer (NDSP) initiative, which aims to generate innovative research on practices of prayer and to build an interdisciplinary network of scholars engaged in the study of prayer. NDSP currently funds twenty-eight scholars and journalists conducting research on practices of prayer throughout the world through a grants program supported by funding from the John Templeton Foundation.

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  • 79.Sexual Violence and Exploitation: Assessment, Monitoring and Reporting

    On behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the SSRC organized and hosted a Technical Consultation on Sexual Violence and Exploitation in Conflict Situations on December 15-16, 2005. The Consultation convened a wide range of experts, including scholars and practitioners across the fields of public health, human rights, demography, epidemiology, political science, statistics, and conflict resolution. The goal was to assess the potential and propose first steps for designing and piloting a standardized system for the assessment, monitoring, and reporting of sexual violence and exploitation in conflict situations. .

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  • 80.Sloan Scholars Mentoring Network

    Supporting diversity in STEM through professional development, mentoring, networking, & leadership training.

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  • 81.Tale of Two Recoveries

    Impact of the US Housing Crisis on the Racial Wealth Gap Across Generations.

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  • 82.The China-Africa Knowledge Project

    Strengthening cross-regional research networks and collaboration.

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  • 83.The China-Africa Knowledge Project Resource Hub

    The China-Africa Knowledge Project Resource Hub is a one-stop shop for researchers and practitioners working on the China-Africa relationship. As the primary platform for the work of the Social Science Research Council’s China-Africa Knowledge Project, this site actively builds generative connections between scholars across disciplines and regions while organizing a growing and fragmented body of knowledge and connecting it to important trends in the social sciences relevant for understanding Africa’s new international relations.  As host to the Chinese in Africa / Africans in China Research Network, it widens the reach of existing cross-regional communities of knowledge. For more information and updates about the China-Africa Knowledge Project, visit china-africa.ssrc.org.

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  • 84.The China-Africa Working Group

    Strengthening cross-regional research networks and collaboration.

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  • 85.The Chinese in Africa/Africans in China Research Network (CA/AC Research Network)

    Strengthening cross-regional research networks and collaboration.

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  • 86.The DR Congo Affinity Group

    Established on 1 November 2012, the Affinity Group on the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is a network of leading scholars and researchers working on the DRC who are deeply familiar with the context of the current challenges facing the country after two decades of war, and who can provide long-term analysis and recommendations to help inform international engagement in the region. This “brain trust” on the DRC provides analysis of the crises facing the DRC and situates these challenges in a long-term view of the political, social, and security trends in the country and the region. Where necessary, the Affinity Group identifies gaps in existing evidence and knowledge and undertakes the necessary research to fill the knowledge gaps identified by its analysis. As with the landmark Ford Foundation Study Group on South Africa in the 1980s, and the short-lived UN Secretary-General's Resource Group on the DRC established in 1998 at the start of the Second Congo War, the Affinity Group on the DRC seeks to keep its analysis and research firmly distinct from advocacy efforts, yet remains flexible to respond to and help inform policy processes. DRC Affinity Group members: Download DR Congo Affinitiy Group Member Biographies [.pdf] Tatiana Carayannis (Project Director) Social Science Research Council Federico Borello Center for Civilians in Conflict Mvemba Dizolele Johns Hopkins University Jean-Marie Guéhenno International Crisis Group  Fabienne Hara Sciences-Po, Paris School of International Affairs Pascal Kambale Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA) Michel Noureddine Kassa Initiative for a Cohesive Leadership in the DRC Jason Stearns Center on International Cooperation  Jean Omasombo Tshonda The Royal Museum for Central Africa at Tervuren and University of Kinshasa Anneke Van Woudenberg Human Rights Watch Koen Vlassenroot University of Ghent Herbert Weiss The City University of New York.

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  • 87.The Democracy Papers

    Can democracies capably address large problems in the public interest?.

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  • 88.The Drug Research Papers

    Disseminating research on drug policy.

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  • 89.The Fourth Wave: Violence, Gender, Culture & HIV in the 21st Century

    UNESCO commissioned the SSRC'S HIV/AIDS Program in 2006 to assess the social science, public health, and public policy literature dealing with the sociocultural and gender dimensions of the HIV and AIDS pandemic. Following the publication of an in-depth literature review, the SSRC and UNESCO invited more than twenty senior scholars, policy makers, and practitioners from around the world to contribute to an edited volume about the failure of policies and programs to respond to the growing feminization of the HIV and AIDS pandemic. The volume, co-edited by SSRC Senior Adviser Jennifer Klot and medical anthropologist Vinh-Kim Nguyen,The Fourth Wave: Violence, Gender, Culture & HIV in the 21st Century will be co-published by the SSRC and UNESCO in 2009. Working papers and an interactive essay forum will be launched in summer 2009. .

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  • 90.The Immanent Frame

    Secularism, religion, and the public sphere.

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  • 91.The Religious Lives of Migrant Minorities

    The SSRC Migration Program is sponsoring research to investigate the family, community, and national lives of Christian (Pentecostal), Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist migrants in London, Johannesburg, and Kuala Lumpur. The plan is to produce edited volumes about the religious lives of migrant minorities in each of city and a fourth volume on the themes common to the three sites. This project marks the first attempt by social scientists to compare internationally the role of world religions in the adaptation of migrants to different national contexts.

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  • 92.Transregional Virtual Research Institute

    Media, Activism, and the New Political: InterAsian Perspectives.

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  • 93.University Governance and Autonomy in the Changing Landscape of Higher Education in the Arab World

    The SSRC's Middle East and North Africa Program has undertaken an initiative to explore the role of the Arab university. We are focusing in particular on the efforts being made by academic communities to secure critical spheres of autonomy (vis-à-vis teaching, research, and publishing)--a process that is crucial for a functioning higher education sector and a lively public sphere. Another area of focus is Arab university governance: how has it evolved in response to national, regional, and global restructurings, and what impact has this had on the role of the university?.

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  • 94.Viet Nam Population Health Programme: Strategic Learning and Assessment

    Mobilizing knowledge to assess health and social interventions in Vietnam.

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  • 95.Vietnam Program

    Working to strengthen social science research capacity and links to policymaking in Vietnam.

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  • 96.Web Anthology on Migrant Remittances and Development: Research Perspectives

    In response to the growing interest in the possible contributions that migrants’ remittances can make to development, we have assembled an anthology of research articles that address this process as related to both internal and international migration. The overall goal has been to provide access to articles that bring key conceptual, methodological, and theoretical approaches to topics of central interest to both researchers and policy makers through contemporary research drawn from across the social sciences. Though much of the research is economic in approach, we also provide research based in anthropology, sociology, political science, and other disciplines.   This anthology is an experiment in publication. By agreement with the authors and original publishers, the articles provided for free downloading here will be available for one year, until March 2010. At that time we will reassess whether the anthology should and can be continued and, if so, in what form. Most publishers have allowed free access to their publications; some have charged a fee or imposed other restrictions; others have refused to permit open access to their publications on a “third party” website, even for a fee. Readers of this anthology are encouraged to download the articles provided for personal and educational use.   To download the anthology, go to:  Web Anthology Online Forum.

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  • 97.West Africa: Forced Migration and Human Rights

    To explore how a human rights framework might strengthen protections for forced migrants, the SSRC Migration Program organized research between social scientists and practitioners of international humanitarian and human rights organizations.  Research focused on the causes of forced displacement, protections and work, resettlement, and return of Sierra Leonean forced migrants.

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  • 98.Work with Economists in Cuba

    Fostering new systems in Cuba for distributing goods and services.

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  • 99.Working Group on Climate Change

    What does climate change have to do with democracy? Quite a bit, it turns out. But the political dimensions of climate policy have not been adequately explored by researchers, while the climate problem is at a critical moment both of understanding and political action. Professors Robert O. Keohane (Princeton University) and Nancy Rosenblum (Harvard University) are leading an interdisciplinary group of scholars to address the difficulties that democracies encounter in responding effectively to climate change. The temporal and geographical dimensions of climate change are unusual for democratic institutions, and its public goods nature poses difficulties in getting the incentives for effective action right. The climate change policies of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, exemplified in the Kyoto Protocol, have not worked well. Framing the issue almost entirely in terms of reducing emissions, rather than also emphasizing adaptation and building infrastructure, generated a narrow pathway toward effectiveness. With respect to this mitigation pathway, the emphasis under Kyoto was on legally binding commitments, with targets and timetables set in advance of state action—a demanding approach that would have required greater than available political commitment to succeed. COP21 negotiations took a different approach, beginning with national pledges for voluntary action, with arrangements—as yet, not sufficiently well-defined—for periodic review and transparency. Whether this approach generates more progress will depend in considerable measure on how whether the review process is progressively strengthened and how well it works over the next few years. The Working Group on Climate Change is taking a longer-term perspective, aiming to catalyze new understandings of the politics, sociology, and political theory of climate change policy in a historical and comparative perspective. The aim is to stimulate and reorient social scientific work on climate change, encouraging linkage to the study of social movements in the United States and elsewhere, to the analysis of institutions, international, transnational, and domestic, and to rethink received wisdom on the relation of science and democratic deliberation. The hope therefore is to make a contribution to politically effective action which responds meaningfully to ongoing climate change. For news and announcements about this working group and other Anxieties of Democracy program activities, please click here: @SSRCdemocracy.   Co-Chairs Robert O. Keohane Professor of International Affairs, Princeton University Nancy Rosenblum Senator Joseph Clark Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government, Harvard University   Members Scott Barrett Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics, Columbia University Jessica Green Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, New York University David M. Konisky Associate Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University Bloomington Melissa Lane Class of 1943 Professor of Politics, Princeton University Douglas McAdam The Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology, Stanford University Michael Oppenheimer Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs, Princeton University Naomi Oreskes Professor of the History of Science and Affiliated Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University Johannes Urpelainen Associate Professor of Political Science, Columbia University   Image credit: “Iceberg with Hole” by Brocken Inaglory [CC 2.0].

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  • 100.Working Group on Institutions

    The American public’s trust in government, and especially in Congress, the central institution of representative democracy in the U.S., stands near all-time lows. In this mistrust of democratic institutions, Americans are not alone in the world. Yet they are right to worry. The U.S. system, with its complex array of checks and balances, usually requires broad consensus to function. But this consensus rarely emerges in this era of ideological polarization, close two-party competition, and hyperpartisanship. Meanwhile, policy challenges continue to mount, amidst growing economic, social, and political inequalities. The Anxieties of Democracy program’s Working Group on Institutions was created to address contemporary concerns about the performance and legitimacy of representative political institutions. Co-chaired by Professors Frances Lee (University of Maryland) and Nolan McCarty (Princeton University), this group operates under two assumptions: first, polarized parties are a fact of life, given the long evolutionary processes that have ideologically sorted the parties and that have finally brought U.S. parties into alignment with those in other advanced democracies. Second, major constitutional reform altering the U.S. system will not be forthcoming. If these two assumptions are correct, what does this mean for policymaking, federalism, and the functioning of American institutions of government?   Products will aim to stimulate and reorient social scientific work on government institutions, linked to the study of social movements and institutions in the United States and elsewhere. For news and announcements about this working group and other Anxieties of Democracy program activities, please click here: @SSRCdemocracy.   Co-Chairs Frances Lee Professor of Government and Politics, University of Maryland Nolan McCarty Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Princeton University   Members Brandice Canes-Wrone Donald E. Stokes Professor of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University Daniel Carpenter Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard University Anthony Chen Associate Professor of Sociology and Political Science, Northwestern University Elisabeth Gerber Jack L. Walker, Jr. Professor of Public Policy, University of Michigan Daniel Gillion Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania Matthew Grossmann Associate Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University Meg Jacobs Research Scholar, Princeton University Suzanne Mettler Clinton Rossiter Professor of American Institutions, Cornell University Gillian Metzger Stanley H. Fuld Professor of Law, Columbia University David J. Samuels Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Political Science, University of Minnesota Eric Schickler Jeffrey and Ashley McDermott Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley Mark Schmitt Director, Political Reform Program, New America Foundation Arthur Spirling Associate Professor of Politics and Data Science, New York University Charles Stewart III Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology   Image credit: “2014 United States Capitol scaffolding 03” by Farragutful [CC BY-SA 4.0]  .

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