Riots in France Essay Forum

Cesari, Jocelyne (Contributor), Dufoix, Stéphane (Contributor), Hargreaves, Alec G. (Contributor), Kastoryano, Riva (Contributor), Poupeau, Franck (Contributor), Roy, Olivier (Contributor), Salanié, Bernard (Contributor), Silverstein, Paul (Contributor), Suleiman, Ezra (Contributor), Tetreault, Chantal M. (Contributor), Wieviorka, Michel (Contributor) and Wihtol de Wenden, Catherine (Contributor)

On October 27, 2005, two French youths of Malian and Tunisian descent were electrocuted as they fled the police in the Parisian suburb of Clichy-sous-Bois. Their deaths sparked nearly three weeks of rioting in 274 towns throughout the Paris region, France, and beyond (see maps, pictures, and graphs here.) The rioters, mostly unemployed teenagers from destitute suburban housing projects (the cités HLM) caused over €200 million in damage as they torched nearly 9000 cars and dozens of buildings, daycare centers, and schools. The French police arrested close to 2900 rioters; 126 police and firefighters were injured, and there was one fatality – a bystander who died after being struck by a hooded youth.

The French government’s response, if not swift, was predictable. Then Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy declared a “zero tolerance” policy towards urban violence. A year later, when civil unrest again flared up in the same suburbs – on October 1, 2006 in Les Mureaux, Yvelines, again the result of an incident with the police – Sarkozy returned to the his “law and order” discourse. The government’s response in November 2005 and since was amplified by a wide range of commentary that attempted to link the rioting to illegal immigration, Muslim separatism, and polygamous practices. In fact, while most of the rioters were second generation immigrant youths, the underlying issues were far more complex, involving social and economic exclusion, racial discrimination, and most importantly the capacity of the French Republic to respond to these challenges while maintaining its distinctive model of and formal commitment to the social integration of individuals, no matter what their color or creed.

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Title
Riots in France Essay Forum
Author
Cesari, Jocelyne (Contributor), Dufoix, Stéphane (Contributor), Hargreaves, Alec G. (Contributor), Kastoryano, Riva (Contributor), Poupeau, Franck (Contributor), Roy, Olivier (Contributor), Salanié, Bernard (Contributor), Silverstein, Paul (Contributor), Suleiman, Ezra (Contributor), Tetreault, Chantal M. (Contributor), Wieviorka, Michel (Contributor) and Wihtol de Wenden, Catherine (Contributor)
Published
Social Science Research Council, 2005
On the web
Citation
Riots in France Essay Forum, Cesari, Jocelyne (Contributor), Dufoix, Stéphane (Contributor), Hargreaves, Alec G. (Contributor), Kastoryano, Riva (Contributor), Poupeau, Franck (Contributor), Roy, Olivier (Contributor), Salanié, Bernard (Contributor), Silverstein, Paul (Contributor), Suleiman, Ezra (Contributor), Tetreault, Chantal M. (Contributor), Wieviorka, Michel (Contributor) and Wihtol de Wenden, Catherine (Contributor) (New York: Social Science Research Council, 2005), http://riotsfrance.ssrc.org/.