African Americans Respond to Stigmatization: The Meanings and Salience of Confronting, Deflecting Conflict, Educating the Ignorant and ‘Managing the Self’

Article written by 2007 DPDF Rethinking Europe: Religion, Ethnicity, Nation Fellow Crystal Fleming, Michèle Lamont, and Jessica S. Welburn:

Drawing on interviews with 150 randomly sampled African Americans, we analyse how members of a stigmatized group understand their experience of stigmatization and assess appropriate responses when asked about the best approach to deal with stigmatization and about responses to specific incidents. Combining in-depth interviews with a systematic coding of the data, we make original contributions to the previous literature by identifying the relative salience of modalities and tools for responding. We also examine closely through qualitative data the two most salient modalities of response, ‘confronting’ and ‘deflating’ conflict, the most salient tools, teaching out-group members about African Americans, and ‘the management of the self’, a rationale for deflating conflict that is largely overlooked in previous studies. We find that ‘confronting’ is the more popular modality for responding to stigmatization among African Americans.

Title
African Americans Respond to Stigmatization: The Meanings and Salience of Confronting, Deflecting Conflict, Educating the Ignorant and ‘Managing the Self’
Author
Fleming, Crystal
Published
Routledge, March 2012
On the web
Citation
Fleming, Crystal, "African Americans Respond to Stigmatization: The Meanings and Salience of Confronting, Deflecting Conflict, Educating the Ignorant and ‘Managing the Self’," in Ethnic and Racial Studies, ed. (Routledge, March 2012), http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/lamont/files/fleming_lamont_welburn._2012.pdf, 35, 3, 400-417.