The Grassroots Nature of Counterinsurgent Tribal Militia Formation: The Case of the Fertit in Southern Sudan, 1985–1989

Publication written by 2009 DPDF State Violence Fellow Daniel Blocq: 

Many counterinsurgent tribal militias emerged during the second civil war in Southern Sudan. Existing studies give the impression that formation of these groups was largely a top-down process. Focusing on the rise of the Fertit militia and relying on a series of in-depth interviews with tribal leaders, this article challenges that assumption. The article shows that the emergence of the Fertit militia was principally a grassroots phenomenon stemming from local tensions and conflicts. The article discusses the wider applicability of these insights and, generally, proposes a more nuanced approach to the study of counterinsurgent militia formation. The approach suggests simultaneous attention to state interventions and local interactions.

Title
The Grassroots Nature of Counterinsurgent Tribal Militia Formation: The Case of the Fertit in Southern Sudan, 1985–1989
Author
Blocq, Daniel
Published
Routledge, December 2014
On the web
Citation
Blocq, Daniel, "The Grassroots Nature of Counterinsurgent Tribal Militia Formation: The Case of the Fertit in Southern Sudan, 1985–1989," in Journal of Eastern African Studies, ed. (Routledge, December 2014), http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17531055.2014.946336#.VIHjQTHF-So, 8, 4, 710-724.