• 1.Fellowships

    Promoting innovative research worldwide Since 1923, the SSRC has awarded more than fifteen thousand fellowships to researchers around the globe. Council fellowship programs are strategic—they target specific problems, promote individual and institutional change, and expand networks. The SSRC’s varied fellowships and prizes share a core commitment to improving conditions for social science knowledge production worldwide. Programs engage themes ranging from global issues facing the United States and Japan to security in Africa and Latin America. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 2.Get Involved

    SUPPORT THE SSRC Council programs support researchers, build worldwide capacity for knowledge production, and nurture innovation and excellence. For more than ninety years, these activities have been made possible by the generosity of our foundation, institutional, governmental, and individual partners. The need for rich and effective social science is urgent and persistent. As a proven incubator for new forms of inquiry, and as a connector and communicator of research and expertise, the SSRC plays a vital role in the work of building a more just society. Our donors are key partners in that work. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 3.Board of Directors | About

    Board of Directors The SSRC is governed by a board of directors made up of social scientists and practitioners from a broad range of disciplines and institutions. The board elects the SSRC president and regularly reviews the Council’s intellectual program. An executive committee of the board oversees financial and operational aspects. h6 {font-size: 1.4rem} danah boyd Founder and President, Data & Society Executive Committee Member danah boyd is the founder and president of Data & Society, a research institute focused on understanding the role of data-driven technologies in society. She is also a principal researcher at Microsoft Research and a visiting professor at New York University. Her research is focused on addressing social and cultural inequities by understanding the relationship between technology and society. Her most recent books—It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens and Participatory Culture in a Networked Age—examine the intersection of everyday practices and social media. She is a 2011 Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a director of Crisis Text Line, and a trustee of the National Museum of the American Indian. She received a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Brown University, a master’s degree from the MIT Media Lab, and a PhD in information from the University of California, Berkeley. Her Twitter handle is @zephoria, and her website is danah.org. Teresa P. R. Caldeira Professor of City and Regional Planning, College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley Chair • Executive Committee Member Teresa P. R. Caldeira is professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at UC Berkeley. She is also professor of geography and a member of the Steering Committee of the UC Berkeley–Mellon Global Urban Humanities Initiative. Her research focuses on the predicaments of urbanization, such as spatial segregation, social discrimination, and the uses of public space in cities of the global south. She has analyzed the processes that generate these cities, such as peripheral urbanization and autoconstruction, highlighting their inventiveness, political cartographies, and modes of collective life. An anthropologist by training, she has been especially interested in reshaping ethnographic methods for the study of cities and political action, a practice exemplified in her award-winning book City of Walls: Crime, Segregation, and Citizenship in São Paulo (University of California Press, 2001). One of her current research projects investigates the emergence of new formations of collective life in four cities of the global south (São Paulo, Delhi, Johannesburg, and Jakarta). These new arrangements are considerably transforming the everyday, urban spaces, and politics of these cities, reflected in new forms of spatial composition, household arrangements, livelihood, and everyday circulation. She is the recipient of a UC Berkeley Faculty Mentor Award and of a UC President’s Faculty Research Fellowship in the Humanities. In 2012 she was named a Guggenheim Fellow. Caldeira was educated at the University of São Paulo (BA in social sciences and MA in political science) and at the University of California, Berkeley (PhD in anthropology). She worked as a professor and researcher in the Brazilian university system between 1980 and 1996. She was a researcher at the Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning (CEBRAP), one of Brazil’s most important research centers in the social sciences, for fifteen years. She was also a professor at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP), São Paulo, before joining the University of California, Irvine. She became a member of the UC Berkeley faculty in 2007. Her work has been published in several languages. Isabelle de Lamberterie Director of Research Emerita, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Isabelle de Lamberterie has been a researcher on comparative law at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris since 1969 and is now director of research emeri…

    Pages
  • 4.Social Science Research Council President Search

    Social Science Research Council President Search Title President/CEO Description The Presidential Search Committee invites nominations for the position of president of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC). Founded in 1923 and based in New York City, with several project offices overseas, the SSRC is an independent, not-for-profit, international organization that advances social scientific research for the benefit of all societies. Its activities include interdisciplinary research, workshops and conferences, fellowships and summer training institutes, and a wide array of scholarly exchanges. In collaboration with several hundred US and internationally based researchers, policymakers, professionals, activists, and others from the private and public sectors, a staff of approximately eighty develops and implements the Council’s programs, while working to strengthen research capacities in the United States and abroad. The SSRC shares knowledge with various publics and decision-making groups through publications and other communications. Responsibilities The president and chief executive officer of the SSRC is responsible for the organizational leadership, fiscal health, and achievement of the SSRC’s vision and goals. The president’s responsibilities include defining organizational and programmatic direction; bringing the Council’s convening power to bear; and communicating the goals, mission, accomplishments, and research findings of the organization and its programs. This president should also be able to lead and oversee the organizing of the Council’s centennial celebration in 2023. As a respected and creative intellectual, the president engages various communities of scholarship and practice, foundations, government and international agencies, and public fora to harness the power of the social sciences and the SSRC itself to make a difference in addressing contemporary challenges around the world. Beyond intellectual leadership and fundraising, the president must possess demonstrated organizational leadership, administrative, and budgetary skills. The president leads, guides, and mentors a diverse staff of professional social scientists, led by two experienced executives, the Vice President of Programs and the Vice President of Administration and Operations. The president supports staff in raising program-specific funds and achieving programmatic goals and is supported by staff in developing new initiatives. The president works to increase the Council’s institutional capacities through the cultivation of productive relationships with people of diverse interests and affiliations, including foundations and federal funding and private gifts; superintends the basic features of the budget, especially fundraising to meet core operating costs; and envisions new program directions. The president reports to the SSRC Board of Directors and usually has a five-year renewable term. The president of the Council should be a distinguished social scientist dedicated to scholarly, programmatic, and institutional innovation. They will possess a wide range of intellectual interests, an appreciation for different scholarly approaches, and the capacity to connect, collaborate, and facilitate across diverse geographic, institutional, and intellectual boundaries. The Council’s president must also be an energetic fundraiser, skilled speaker, and an able representative of the social sciences who can explain their contributions to the public interest. .l-generic-page h3 {margin-top: 20px; margin-bottom: 5px; font-size: 18px; font-weight: bold;} Desirable Attributes and Skills Intellectual and Creative Leadership - The president should have a strong base in the social sciences, broadly defined, wide-ranging intellectual interests, and breadth of intellect. Evidence of distinguished leadership related to the academy and intellectual life is expected, as are deep connections within academia. The president should seek to advance new ideas and approaches and help the SSRC to build new areas of scholarship. The president should be a cr…

    Pages
  • 5.Who We Are | About

    Who We Are Better understanding makes for better choices. The SSRC is an international, interdisciplinary network of networks dedicated to galvanizing knowledge and mobilizing it for the public good. The Council is unique in scope and structure. It convenes scholars, practitioners, and policymakers while standing alongside the academy and public affairs. By supporting individual scholars, enhancing the capacity of institutions, generating new research, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens, the SSRC plays a vital role in efforts to build a more just and democratic world. The SSRC was founded in 1923 by visionaries in the fledgling fields of anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, sociology, and statistics. The organization was shaped by the need to cross the boundaries that separated these disciplines from each other, university scholarship from public affairs, and the social sciences from the humanities and the natural sciences. For more than ninety years, the SSRC has navigated these borders, emerging as both a pivotal force in the academy and a respected contributor to the public good. Today, our work remains focused on enhancing the capacity of scholars and institutions and on building research networks that cross regions and disciplines to produce and communicate new knowledge. View the SSRC Informational Brochure. [PDF] Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 6.Where We Work | About

    Where We Work With headquarters in Brooklyn, New York, the SSRC partners with scholars, academic institutions, NGOs, and governmental bodies across the world. Council activities and networks span more than 80 countries on 6 continents. Learn more about SSRC Programs. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 7.Social Science Research Council Joins Other Social Science Organizations in Expressing Concern about Reported Instructions to the CDC to Ban Specific Words and Terms in FY19 Budget Requests

    Social Science Research Council Joins Other Social Science Organizations in Expressing Concern about Reported Instructions to the CDC to Ban Specific Words and Terms in FY19 Budget Requests The Social Science Research Council (SSRC), a convener of the associations of the various social science disciplines and an independent organization with a nearly century-old legacy of commitment to scientific integrity, is deeply troubled by reports of the administration’s banning of specific words in the 2019 budget requests of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The steadfast commitment of America’s public and private agencies to “science-based” and “evidence-based” inquiry and policy is a constant source of innovation—economic, technological, medical, and in human well-being—and a prime impetus for the respect in which US scientists are held throughout the world. Further, the SSRC is in agreement with our fellow social science organizations in believing “diversity” has been an essential strength of this country from its beginnings, and banning related terms belies the truth of our shared history and inextricably linked future. The SSRC joins the American Anthropological Association, the American Historical Association, the American Sociological Association, the American Statistical Association, and other scientific and engineering organizations as signatories on an American Association for the Advancement of Science letter to Mick Mulvaney, the director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, that underscores the importance of reliability of scientific information and the integrity of scientific research. The American Political Science Association similarly issued a statement “urging federal agencies to reiterate their commitment to scientific freedom, evidence-based policymaking, and freedom of expression.” The American Psychological Association “urge[d] the administration to support evidence-based government programs.” The SSRC believes principles of scientific freedom and integrity must be maintained, free of political influence. h1 {margin-bottom: 15px;} Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 8.Historical Timeline | About

    Historical Timeline The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) has been in operation for more than ninety years. We present this timeline of organizational achievements and other highlights during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. For more detailed accounts of the SSRC’s history, see our one-page history of the SSRC and Social Science Research Council, 1923–1998. The SSRC’s records are stored in the Rockefeller Archive Center, Sleepy Hollow, New York. SSRC: 90 Years of Impact Early History 1923: Led by American Political Science Association president Charles E. Merriam, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) holds its inaugural meeting. 1924: The SSRC begins planning its first committees to study such topics as Interracial Relations, Scientific Aspects of Human Migration, and the Eighteenth Amendment. 1928: The Advisory Committee on Business Research, whose members include New York State Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, is founded, signaling the Council’s commitment to research on business practices, ethics, and industry relations. 1935: The SSRC establishes the Washington, DC–based Committee on Social Security. Its research is critical to the creation of the U.S. Social Security system. 1936: Ralph Bunche, Margaret Mead, and Grayson Kirk are among a cohort of scholars receiving fellowship support from the SSRC. 1937: The SSRC commissions 13 research memoranda to record and analyze the influence of the Great Depression on American society. Topics include crime, education, the family, internal migration, minorities, religion, consumption, health, and social work. 1942: With the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the National Research Council, the SSRC establishes the Committee on Latin American Studies. One of several new committees founded with the ACLS, it marks the beginning of the Council’s work focused on developing US expertise on world regions. 1945: George Gallup, Elmo Roper, and Frank Stanton are founding members of the Committee on Measurement of Opinion, Attitudes, and Consumer Wants, which examines problems of sampling, of biases introduced by interviewers, and of the use of panels of responses in repetitive surveys. Post–World War II 1947: Robert B. Hall publishes his influential Area Studies: With Special Reference to Their Implications for Research in the Social Sciences, sponsored by the SSRC’s Exploratory Committee on World Area Research. It warns of scholarly ignorance about many areas of the world and recommends a sweeping educational initiative. Within two years, committees on Slavic and East European Studies and Southern Asia are established. 1947: The SSRC publishes The Reduction of Intergroup Tensions: A Survey of Research on Problems of Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Group Relations. 1949: Future Nobel Prize winner Simon Kuznets chairs the SSRC’s Committee on Economic Growth, which for two decades shaped basic theory and quantitative research methods in economics. Over the next few decades, future Nobel laureates in economics would participate in the Council’s work in this area: Herbert Simon, Lawrence Klein, James Tobin, George Stigler, Franco Modigliani, and George Akerlof. Much more recently, Paul Krugman was involved in developing our work on the privatization of risk. 1954: The SSRC establishes the Committee on Comparative Politics, chaired by Gabriel Almond. It sponsors pioneering work in the area of modernization and development in the wake of decolonization. 1956: The SSRC creates the Committee on National Security Policy Research; members include Henry Kissinger. Subsequent Council programs covering international affairs topics attract the participation of other prominent foreign policy figures and commentators including John Lewis Gaddis, Zbigniew Brzezinski, McGeorge Bundy, Robert Keohane, William Pfaff, Condoleezza Rice, and George Shultz. 1959: The SSRC, with the ACLS, forms committees on Contemporary China, the Near and Middle East, and African Studies. 1961: Responding to breakthroughs in scientific research, the SSRC founds a committee on…

    Pages
  • 9.Programs

    AREAS OF RESEARCH AND COLLABORATION The Council’s programs nurture the excellent, the experimental, and the innovative. Our work is currently organized around the following general themes: Media, Technology & Politics Economic & Social Policy Global & Regional Connections Governance, Democracy & Civil Society Health & Environment Higher Education Peace, Conflict & Security Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 10.Print & Digital

    Sharing New Knowledge The SSRC has published in the social sciences since 1929 and continues to shape the direction of scholarship and public policy through a wide range of books, reports, working papers, policy briefs, and articles. SSRC digital projects extend our tradition of engagement through rigorous inquiry, offering informed perspectives on topics of pressing concern and essential resources for researchers and practitioners. Digital projects include forums, essay collections, resource hubs, and exhibitions of our programmatic work. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 11.An American Dilemma for the 21st Century

    An American Dilemma for the 21st Century On Wednesday, October 30, 2019 nearly two-hundred scholars, leaders, and community members gathered at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture for “An American Dilemma for the 21st Century,” a day-long conference marking the seventy-fifth anniversary of Gunnar Mydral’s An American Dilemma: The Negro Problem and Modern Democracy and the launch of a digital platform expanding access to the Carnegie-Myrdal research archive. Published in 1944 by Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal, An American Dilemma remains a seminal text for understanding racism in the United States during the twentieth century. For Myrdal and his collaborators, the central dilemma was the unresolved tension of the “American creed”—the celebration of ideals of equal opportunity and democracy, in the face of deep racial discrimination and inequality. An American Dilemma helped to expose the immoral hypocrisy of legalized anti-Black racism in the US, and informed critical civil rights victories in the post-war era, such as the Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education. While Myrdal has, deservedly, received considerable praise for the work, lesser-known are the dozens of social scientists who contributed to the publication and its foundational study. Commissioned by Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Carnegie-Myrdal Study of the Negro in America includes twenty-nine memoranda written by Myrdal and scholars such as Ralph Bunche, Margaret Brenman, E. Franklin Frazier, Ruth Landes, and S. U. Etuk. Given the increased visibility of racial antagonism and violence in recent years, coupled with the reemergence of Black-led protests in the aftermath of #BlackLivesMatter, the “American Dilemma for the 21st Century” conference offered an occasion to revisit and reassess the “American creed” and its surrounding tensions. Throughout the day, panelists explored the multifaceted force of anti-Black racism in the US. In discussions on housing, the economy, policing, and education, the day’s speakers unpacked both historical and contemporary fissures between opportunity and exclusion. Panelists also offered rich reflections on An American Dilemma itself, and offered critiques of the sociopolitical context that motivated the project’s commissioning, author selection, and crafted presentation toward white audiences; many noting the already substantial body of research from Black scholars like W. E. B. Du Bois. As the conference also served as a launch event for the newly digitized Carnegie-Myrdal research archive, attendees also heard from the creative and curatorial team behind the platform’s design. In a session titled “Out of the Archives,” Christopher Paul Harris, Jonathan Jackson (WeShouldDoItAll), and Myriah Towner demonstrated the platform’s capabilities and described the process of translating a text-heavy archive into a dynamic, attractive, and navigable tool “that anyone can use.” Featured in the demo were memoranda from the study’s “hidden figures,” including downloadable copies of original materials housed at the Schomburg Center. To close the program, SSRC president Alondra Nelson engaged Professors Jelani Cobb and Phillip Atiba Goff in a stirring conversation that crystallized the importance of historical data in working to remedy both foundational and symptomatic instances of injustice. Echoing remarks made by Dr. Rajiv Sethi in an earlier panel, Dr. Goff encouraged the audience to visit the new Carnegie-Myrdal digital archive, pointing specifically to Raper’s memo. Rich in police data about the use of deadly force, officer and suspect demographics, as well as first-hand interviews, Raper’s memo, according to Goff, offers a unique opportunity to explore theoretical explanations of racial disparities in policing that deviate from popular narratives and interventions focused on “hearts and minds” rather than malignant structural configurations. In all of the day’s presentations and discussions, the need for leveraging historical data in designin…

    Pages
  • 12.Executive Officers | About

    Executive Officers Working social scientists, the SSRC’s executive officers inspire and manage programming and operations with the counsel and oversight of the Board of Directors. Current Executive Officers ALONDRA NELSON President RONALD KASSIMIR Vice President of Programs FRED PALM Vice President of Administration and Operations A History of Leadership 1923–27 Charles E. Merriam (chairman) 1927–29 Wesley C. Mitchell (chairman) 1927–31 Robert S. Lynd (permanent secretary) 1929–31 Edwin B. Wilson (president) 1931–32 Robert S. Woodworth (president) 1931–45 Robert T. Crane (permanent secretary, 1931–32; executive director, 1932–45) 1945–48 Donald Young (executive director, 1945–47; president, 1948) 1948–68 Pendleton Herring (president) 1948–70 Paul Webbink (vice president) 1966–71 Henry W. Riecken (vice president, 1966–68; president, 1969–71) 1971–72 Ralph W. Tyler (acting president) 1972–79 Eleanor Bernert Sheldon (president) 1973–89 David L. Sills (executive associate) 1974–78 David Jenness (executive associate) 1979–85 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1985–86 Francis X. Sutton (interim president) 1986–89 Frederic E. Wakeman Jr. (president) 1988–89 David L. Szanton (executive associate) 1988–89 Richard C. Rockwell (executive associate) 1989–95 David L. Featherman (president) 1990–95 Stanley J. Heginbotham (vice president) 1995–98 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1997–2019 Mary Byrne McDonnell (executive program director, 1997–99; executive director, 1999–2018; senior vice president for strategic learning and special initiatives, 2018-2019) 1998–99 Orville (Bert) Brim Jr. (interim president) 1999–2012 Craig Calhoun (president) 2012–2017 Ira Katznelson (president) 2015–present Ronald Kassimir (executive program director, 2015-2018; vice president of programs, 2018-present) 2017–present Alondra Nelson (president) 2019–present Fred Palm (vice president of administration and operations) Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 13.First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science

    First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science The SSRC hosted thirty-five senior academic and administrative leaders from member institutions of its University Fund for the Social Sciences at a conference exploring challenges and opportunities for producing, sharing, and using insights from the social sciences. The University Fund is composed of institutions of higher education that support the work of the SSRC and share the vision that research is essential to advancing the public missions of scholars and scholarship. The October 16 convening was hosted by the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and was organized by a planning committee that included Peter Lange, of Duke University and the SSRC’s Board of Directors; Deborah Prentice, provost of Princeton University; Chase Robinson, president of the CUNY Graduate Center; and Alberta Sbragia, vice provost at the University of Pittsburgh. The program focused on the concerns of the SSRC’s To Secure Knowledge task force, created to recommend ways to protect and advance social science’s ability to contribute to scientific innovation and public problem-solving. The University Fund representatives examined the nature of higher education in our current moment, including doubts about claims to scientific expertise; the optimal institutional arrangements for the production of research and social policy; and the accessibility and integrity of scholarly, federal, and proprietary data systems for social research as well as the opportunities these systems present for scientific advancement and social impact. Suggestions emerging from the University Fund conference will contribute to the task force’s report, to be released in early 2018. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 14.Directions to the SSRC

    Directions to the SSRC View Larger Map The Social Science Research Council is located at One Pierrepont Plaza in Brooklyn, on the 15th floor. Our street address, according to Google Maps, is 300 Cadman Plaza West, just north of Pierrepont Street. We are near several subway stops. Detailed directions are available for trains arriving from Manhattan: 2, 3: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 2, 3) 4, 5: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 4, 5) A, C: High St/Brooklyn Bridge (detailed directions from the A, C) F: Jay St/Borough Hall (detailed directions from the F) R: Court St (detailed directions from the R) Upon entering the building, please show your ID to the front desk attendant, who will grant you access to the elevators. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. If you need any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact the front desk at 212-377-2700. Thank you! Our mailing address is: Social Science Research Council One Pierrepont Plaza, 15th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA P: 212-377-2700 | F: 212-377-2727 | E: info@ssrc.org Detailed Directions from Manhattan 2, 3 to Borough Hall: Use the stairs or escalator toward the rear of the train for the “Court Street and Montague Street” exit. Proceed through the turnstile then exit the station using the staircase on your right to Montague Street. Cross Montague Street toward TD Bank. Look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. To get there, keep walking North (straight) along Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Our main entrance has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. 4, 5 to Borough Hall: Use the staircase toward the middle of the platfrom for the “Borough Hall/Joralemon Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, follow signs toward Borough Hall. Proceed through turnstile then take the stairs furthest to your left. You will exit in front of Duane Reade. Walk north on Court Street (away from starbucks) past Remsen and Montague Streets. At Montague Street, Court Street becomes Cadman Plaza West. Continue north on Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Ours is the first building after Pierrepont Street, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. A, C to High St/Brooklyn Bridge: Use the stairs near the rear of the train for the “Cadman Plaza West, Cranberry Street, Henry Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, proceed to the bank of escalators and up. There is only one exit—when you emerge onto the sidewalk, you’ll be facing south on Cadman Plaza West. Continue straight ahead on Cadman, crossing Clark and Clinton streets. If you look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. F to Jay St/Borough Hall: Use the stairs toward the front of the train for the “Willoughby Street and Jay Street” exit. Walk north on Jay Street (past Metrotech Walk and Mrtyle Avenue) to Johnson Street, which will be the first possible left. Turn left onto Johnson and continue west toward Cadman Plaza West. If you look up, you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the buildin…

    Pages
  • 15.General Terms of Use

    General Terms of Use The information presented and opinions expressed in comments and entries by individuals do not necessarily represent the views of the Social Science Research Council. Content published on the SSRC's public web site is free to be republished and/or redistributed, providing that the use is non-commercial and that the author and the SSRC are properly attributed. We prefer to have those interested in redistributing our web content online do so by publishing an excerpt and link to the full content on the SSRC web site, where it will be freely available, or at least that they include a link to the original content on the SSRC site. SSRC Forums Content For content published in our forums, we strongly recommend contacting the forum's editor/administrator to ensure that there are no other legal restrictions on the use of the material in question. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 16.Themes

    Interdisciplinary Topics and Fields of Work The Council’s roster of programs and activities is flexible and responsive to changes in the world around us. A research area that is critical today may have been emerging just a few years ago, and the scope of the SSRC’s work reflects the ever-changing nature of human life and society. Currently, our work is organized around these seven general themes. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 17.Council Update

    Council Update Subscribe to our Council Update E-Newsletter #mc_embed_signup{background:#F8F9F9; clear:left; font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; } /* Add your own Mailchimp form style overrides in your site stylesheet or in this style block. We recommend moving this block and the preceding CSS link to the HEAD of your HTML file. */ Manage your SSRC email subscription Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 18.Nelson Announces Plans to Step Down as SSRC President in Early Fall 2021;

    Nelson Announces Plans to Step Down as SSRC President in Early Fall 2021; Board Kicks Off Search for Next Leader New York -The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) today announced that President Alondra Nelson, the acclaimed scholar and former Columbia University Dean, who has led the SSRC since 2017, will be stepping down in the early fall of 2021, and that a search for her successor is now underway. In a letter to SSRC staff and partners, Board chair Dr. Mamadou Diouf said of Dr. Nelson, “Her commitment to scholarly rigor, insistence on research innovation and experimentation, and pursuit of new and novel partnerships has reinvigorated the SSRC and positioned it for a vibrant future as it approaches its second century.” He added that Dr. Nelson began discussions with the Board’s Executive Committee in December about her intention to step away from her leadership role, in order to take fullest advantage of her tenure at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and to focus more time on her ongoing research in bioethics, science and society, and social inequality. In a letter to SSRC staff, Dr. Nelson shared, “It has been a true privilege to lead this organization, and to – with all of you – orient it toward its next century in every respect. Together, we have built on SSRC’s legacy of scholarly rigor and intellectual depth and have infused it with greater inclusivity, bravery, and administrative and programmatic excellence on par with our scholarship. The partnerships we have built together have made both our research and our community stronger, for which we should all take great pride.” Dr. Diouf noted three major areas of transformative accomplishment during Nelson’s tenure: integration and collaboration; modernization and future focus; and strategic partnerships. He said, “Alondra has enabled and encouraged colleagues to learn from and leverage one another’s experiences, and has designed new and deepened programs built explicitly for integrated, cross-disciplinary teams.” “The Council also has, under Alondra’s leadership, attracted a cohort of early-career scholars in cutting-edge fields from data science to disinformation to global history, pioneering new methods and study-design approaches, and has made research something the SSRC studies as well as conducts.” “From her earliest days leading the SSRC, Alondra has advanced the goal of mobilizing social science for the public good, and that has meant new faces, new perspectives, and new partnerships. The SSRC has created a new internship program with Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, a mentorship program for Brownsville, Brooklyn high school students, and partnerships with Gothamist, WNYC, Brooklyn Historical Society, the Museum of the City of New York, and The New Yorker, among others. She has also deepened and strengthened relationships with the Council’s new and longstanding supporters, raising nearly 50 million dollars in support of social research. The extraordinary progress of the last few years at the SSRC now affords the organization the ability to begin thinking about its next chapter, in advance of our centennial, and to capitalize on existing momentum to, with Alondra’s help, recruit its first leader for its second century.” The Board’s Executive Committee will serve as the search committee for the SSRC’s next leader, and today launched a web page with search details. For inquiries and nominations, please contact Search Committee Chair, Dr. Helen Milner. June 6, 2020 Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 19.Financials | About

    Financials 2019 Audited Financial Statements 2018 Audited Financial Statements 2017 Audited Financial Statements Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 20.Mellon Mays Program Tackles Concerns of Black South African Scholars

    Mellon Mays Program Tackles Concerns of Black South African Scholars The SSRC’s Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program (MMGIP) supports Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF) fellows through their graduate school years and the professoriate. Its programming is a series of events that target critical junctures in this process. The annual Graduate Student Summer Conference, held on the campus of a Mellon member school, is an introduction to MMGIP, as well as to what fellows may encounter in their first through third years of graduate school. It is modeled, in part, upon a professional association conference. Prominent keynote speakers are invited, and fellows submit abstracts and, if selected, present their work in a paper session forum with feedback from our Mellon PhDs. As most fellows are in American graduate schools, that has been the focus. The MMGIP has over 750 PhD recipients and over 700 graduate students in PhD programs. The University of Cape Town (UCT) became a part of MMUF in 2001 and was joined by the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) and the University of the Western Cape (UWC) in 2008 and 2009, respectively. There are now over 20 South African Mellon PhDs and more than 180 graduate students in pursuit of advanced degrees. This population of fellows has reached a critical mass, with concerns about the academy that are universal, but also issues that are unique to South Africa. To give voice to their concerns and best serve this population of fellows, the program created a pilot Summer Conference for South African fellows to be held during the summer months in Cape Town. Over 40 South African Mellon fellows joined us January 29–31 for this event. While the conference followed the model of the Summer Conference traditionally held in the US, it was uniquely South African. The theme of the conference came from the fellows themselves, entitled “On Being a Black Academic in South Africa.” The conference began with the Benjamin E Mays Address, which is an opportunity for one of our more veteran fellows with a PhD to talk about their career, research, and Mellon experience. Dr. Nkosiyasi Dube, who entered MMUF in 2008 and is currently a lecturer in the Department of Social Work at the University of Witwatersrand, delivered an address that was deeply engaging to the fellows attending. He encouraged fellows to be confident in their work and in themselves as academics, remarking, “If you don’t say it, then no one will know it … whatever you do, don’t be comfortable in your corner—be confident and share [your work] …” He concluded his speech by commenting on the crucial role that Mellon’s support played in his current success. Quoting an African proverb, he said, “The axe that cuts a tree forgets, but the cut tree never [does].” The vice chancellors from Wits and UCT, as well as other professors and administrators from our South African institutions, joined the fellows at dinner for lively conversation and the building of new networks. While the South African Summer Conference followed the model of the US Summer Conference in that fellows were able to present their work on paper panels and get feedback, enjoy workshops on a variety of skills ranging from studying overseas to how to write abstracts and CVs, every participant was South African and affiliated with the Mellon program. This was a powerful example not only of the growth of MMUF in South Africa, but also of the growing production of knowledge from the global South. The keynote panel, “On Being a Black Scholar in South Africa,” included Dr. Abongwe Bangeni, co-ordinator of the Language Development Group at UCT’s Centre for Higher Education Development; Edwina Brooks, director of student development at UCT; and Dr. Sakhumzi Mfecane, department head of anthropology and sociology at UWC. The panelists spoke about issues that fellows wanted addressed. These included the decolonization of the academy; mindfulness of the space one occupies as a black scholar; finding one’s own voice and agency in these spaces; and suppor…

    Pages
  • 21.New Leadership at Measure of America

    New Leadership at Measure of America Measure of America (MOA) has announced that Kristen Lewis, who has been co-director of the program with Sarah Burd-Sharps since they founded MOA in 2007, will lead the program as director. Since its founding, Measure of America has consistently produced provocative, data-driven reports on well-being and access to opportunity in the United States, user-friendly online data tools, and in-depth explorations of a range of crucial public issues, such as the spike in the rate of youth disconnection and the broad community benefits of increased investments in education. The breadth of MOA’s work has proven essential to elected officials and agencies at all levels of government, social service organizations, civic advocacy groups, philanthropic organizations, and the public at large, informing policymakers, legislators, and everyday people. “Sarah Burd-Sharps and Kristen Lewis forged a singularly effective collaboration that has proven immensely beneficial for communities across the United States,” said SSRC president Alondra Nelson. “I applaud Sarah for recognizing the power of the international human development approach for understanding challenges here in the US and thank her for her extraordinary contributions to the program’s success.” Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 22.Social Science Research Council Elects Melissa Nobles and Jennifer Richeson to Board of Directors

    Social Science Research Council Elects Melissa Nobles and Jennifer Richeson to Board of Directors Esteemed Academic Leaders Begin Three-Year Terms July 1 The Social Science Research Council has added two esteemed scholars to its Board of Directors. Dean Melissa Nobles, Kenan Sahin Dean of the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences and professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Professor Jennifer Richeson, Philip R. Allen Professor of Psychology at Yale University, were elected to the SSRC board this month and will begin their three-year terms July 1. “Dean Melissa Nobles and Professor Jennifer Richeson are among the most respected and influential scholars in their fields, a stature inspired by their rigorous scholarship,” said Mamadou Diouf, SSRC board chair. “These two thought leaders and their scholarly work contribute to the public good, thus reflecting the core values of the Council. They will certainly make immense contributions to the SSRC and our efforts to inform the public debate on critical issues.” Nobles’s work focuses on the comparative study of racial and ethnic politics and issues of retrospective justice. Currently, she is constructing a database of racial and ethnic killings in the American South, 1930–1954, uncovering understudied and unknown killings, collaborating as both a faculty member and advisory board member of Northwestern Law School’s Civil Rights and Restorative Justice law clinic. She has authored two books, Shades of Citizenship: Race and the Census in Modern Politics (2000) and The Politics of Official Apologies (2008), and is coeditor with Jun-Hyeok Kwak of Inherited Responsibilities and Historical Reconciliation in East Asia (2013). Richeson’s scholarship examines multiple psychological phenomena related to cultural diversity, in particular how sociocultural group membership, such as race, gender, and socioeconomic status, affect the ways people think, feel, and behave, especially during interactions with members of different sociocultural groups. Currently, her focus is on the dynamics and consequences of the increasing racial and ethnic diversity of the nation. Her work earned her a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur “genius” fellowship in 2006, and in 2015 she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Richeson’s work has been published in a number of academic journals, including Psychological Science, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Nature Neuroscience. “Nobles and Richeson are scholars whose work is making a profound impact in society,” said Dame Sandra Dawson, Council board member and chair of its executive committee. “Moreover, their work encompasses such breadth—race, history, politics, psychology, and social norms—that they will also lend important insight as the SSRC seeks to anticipate the issues and areas of research that should guide our work in the future.” Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 23.New Luce Foundation Grant Funds Asian Studies Initiatives

    New Luce Foundation Grant Funds Asian Studies Initiatives The SSRC has received a three-year, $660,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation for Asian studies development. The grant funds two initiatives: the SSRC Global Scholars Initiative and the AAS-SSRC Dissertation Workshop Series. On the latter, the SSRC is partnering with the Association for Asian Studies. The Global Scholars Initiative will develop the capacity of Asian scholars to produce English-medium articles, making their research accessible to broader academic audiences while supporting these scholars in their careers; the AAS-SSRC Dissertation Workshop Series, a renewal by the Luce Foundation, offers intensive feedback and networking to PhD candidates at strategic points in their careers, thereby supporting the next generation of scholars of Asia. The Global Scholars Initiative will be managed from the SSRC’s Tokyo office, while the AAS-SSRC Dissertation workshops will be managed from the SSRC’s Brooklyn headquarters. More information on both initiatives is forthcoming. For those interested in learning more, please email Nicole Levit at levit@ssrc.org. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 24.Mission | About

    The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization founded in 1923. It fosters innovative research, nurtures new generations of social scientists, deepens how inquiry is practiced within and across disciplines, and mobilizes necessary knowledge on important public issues. The SSRC is guided by the belief that justice, prosperity, and democracy all require better understanding of complex social, cultural, economic, and political processes. We work with practitioners, policymakers, and academic researchers in the social sciences, related professions, and the humanities and natural sciences. We build interdisciplinary and international networks, working with partners around the world to link research to practice and policy, strengthen individual and institutional capacities for learning, and enhance public access to information. Basic Commitments The SSRC approaches its work guided by five basic commitments: Fostering innovation. We work on problems that need new approaches; we act as a catalyst for new thinking. We seek to mobilize the most creative and knowledgeable researchers and to help research institutions be more dynamic. Renewing existing expertise, putting knowledge to work on new problems, and generating novel data and theories are all crucial to advancing social science for the public good. Investing in the future. We ensure the future of knowledge production through nurturing new generations of researchers, enabling practitioners to act on scientific knowledge, enhancing cross-fertilization among intellectual fields, developing capacity where it is most lacking, and facilitating the internationalization of social science. Working internationally and democratically. Better understanding of basic social processes is a resource for improving the lives of all. It should be available to all. Participation in the production of scientific knowledge should also be as broad as possible. We support the internationalization of social science and opportunities for under-represented groups both as matters of equity and as requirements for ensuring that the production of knowledge is informed by different contexts and perspectives. Combining urgency and patience. We bring researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and broader publics together to focus on topics of pressing public importance from health to human rights. But since even the most urgent problems are seldom solved overnight, we must learn even as we act, and we must continually renew existing knowledge. Keeping standards high. Practical action, policy, and debate on major public issues all need to be informed by the best possible knowledge. This is produced by emphasizing scientific quality, engaging important public questions, and ensuring openness to critical analysis. Theory and research can then command the attention of those who approach practical issues with different values or agendas. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages
  • 25.Contact Us | About

    Contact Us Online Form - SSRC Contact Form Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Pages