• 1.Executive Officers | About

    Executive Officers Working social scientists, the SSRC’s executive officers inspire and manage programming and operations with the counsel and oversight of the Board of Directors. Current Executive Officers ALONDRA NELSON President RONALD KASSIMIR Vice President of Programs FRED PALM Vice President of Administration and Operations A History of Leadership 1923–27 Charles E. Merriam (chairman) 1927–29 Wesley C. Mitchell (chairman) 1927–31 Robert S. Lynd (permanent secretary) 1929–31 Edwin B. Wilson (president) 1931–32 Robert S. Woodworth (president) 1931–45 Robert T. Crane (permanent secretary, 1931–32; executive director, 1932–45) 1945–48 Donald Young (executive director, 1945–47; president, 1948) 1948–68 Pendleton Herring (president) 1948–70 Paul Webbink (vice president) 1966–71 Henry W. Riecken (vice president, 1966–68; president, 1969–71) 1971–72 Ralph W. Tyler (acting president) 1972–79 Eleanor Bernert Sheldon (president) 1973–89 David L. Sills (executive associate) 1974–78 David Jenness (executive associate) 1979–85 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1985–86 Francis X. Sutton (interim president) 1986–89 Frederic E. Wakeman Jr. (president) 1988–89 David L. Szanton (executive associate) 1988–89 Richard C. Rockwell (executive associate) 1989–95 David L. Featherman (president) 1990–95 Stanley J. Heginbotham (vice president) 1995–98 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1997–2019 Mary Byrne McDonnell (executive program director, 1997–99; executive director, 1999–2018; senior vice president for strategic learning and special initiatives, 2018-2019) 1998–99 Orville (Bert) Brim Jr. (interim president) 1999–2012 Craig Calhoun (president) 2012–2017 Ira Katznelson (president) 2015–present Ronald Kassimir (executive program director, 2015-2018; vice president of programs, 2018-present) 2017–present Alondra Nelson (president) 2019–present Fred Palm (vice president of administration and operations) Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 2.SSRC President Meets with College and University Fund Institutions

    SSRC President Meets with College and University Fund Institutions SSRC president Alondra Nelson visited a number of College and University Fund member institutions during the 2017–2018 academic year—including Northwestern University, the University of Chicago, Swarthmore College, Indiana University, Arizona State University, the University of California, Davis, and the University of California, Santa Cruz—at each exploring issues such as the future of the social sciences, diversity in the academy, research methodology, and interdisciplinarity. Nelson met with administrators, faculty, and students to discuss issues confronting social scientists (and social-scientists-to-be) nationally and globally and share her vision for the SSRC and how the organization might help address these challenges. In these conversations, Nelson reiterated the Council’s commitment to working to ensure the integrity and accessibility of research. At Northwestern, Nelson also spoke in Graduate School dean Teresa K. Woodruff’s Dean’s Lecture Series, addressing directors of graduate studies on the topic of interdisciplinarity in doctoral training, drawing on the SSRC’s long tradition of cultivating research and collaboration across fields. At UC Davis, President Nelson was pleased to meet with Elizabeth Spiller, dean of the College of Letters and Science. Her visit to the University of Chicago was hosted by Amanda Woodward, dean of the Division of the Social Sciences, and Mark Bradley, deputy dean, and included a lively discussion with faculty and students on diversity in higher education as well as meetings with faculty in the Departments of Sociology, Political Science, History, Genetics, and Comparative Human Behavior. The visit to Swarthmore was hosted by President Valerie Smith. The host institution invited leaders of neighboring Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges to participate in the discussions. Often, these visits culminated with Nelson delivering a public lecture about her research on science, technology, and racial inequality. In fall 2018, Nelson will visit New York University, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of California, Santa Barbara. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 3.Social Science Research Council Joins Other Social Science Organizations in Expressing Concern about Reported Instructions to the CDC to Ban Specific Words and Terms in FY19 Budget Requests

    Social Science Research Council Joins Other Social Science Organizations in Expressing Concern about Reported Instructions to the CDC to Ban Specific Words and Terms in FY19 Budget Requests The Social Science Research Council (SSRC), a convener of the associations of the various social science disciplines and an independent organization with a nearly century-old legacy of commitment to scientific integrity, is deeply troubled by reports of the administration’s banning of specific words in the 2019 budget requests of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The steadfast commitment of America’s public and private agencies to “science-based” and “evidence-based” inquiry and policy is a constant source of innovation—economic, technological, medical, and in human well-being—and a prime impetus for the respect in which US scientists are held throughout the world. Further, the SSRC is in agreement with our fellow social science organizations in believing “diversity” has been an essential strength of this country from its beginnings, and banning related terms belies the truth of our shared history and inextricably linked future. The SSRC joins the American Anthropological Association, the American Historical Association, the American Sociological Association, the American Statistical Association, and other scientific and engineering organizations as signatories on an American Association for the Advancement of Science letter to Mick Mulvaney, the director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, that underscores the importance of reliability of scientific information and the integrity of scientific research. The American Political Science Association similarly issued a statement “urging federal agencies to reiterate their commitment to scientific freedom, evidence-based policymaking, and freedom of expression.” The American Psychological Association “urge[d] the administration to support evidence-based government programs.” The SSRC believes principles of scientific freedom and integrity must be maintained, free of political influence. h1 {margin-bottom: 15px;} Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 4.First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science

    First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science The SSRC hosted thirty-five senior academic and administrative leaders from member institutions of its University Fund for the Social Sciences at a conference exploring challenges and opportunities for producing, sharing, and using insights from the social sciences. The University Fund is composed of institutions of higher education that support the work of the SSRC and share the vision that research is essential to advancing the public missions of scholars and scholarship. The October 16 convening was hosted by the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and was organized by a planning committee that included Peter Lange, of Duke University and the SSRC’s Board of Directors; Deborah Prentice, provost of Princeton University; Chase Robinson, president of the CUNY Graduate Center; and Alberta Sbragia, vice provost at the University of Pittsburgh. The program focused on the concerns of the SSRC’s To Secure Knowledge task force, created to recommend ways to protect and advance social science’s ability to contribute to scientific innovation and public problem-solving. The University Fund representatives examined the nature of higher education in our current moment, including doubts about claims to scientific expertise; the optimal institutional arrangements for the production of research and social policy; and the accessibility and integrity of scholarly, federal, and proprietary data systems for social research as well as the opportunities these systems present for scientific advancement and social impact. Suggestions emerging from the University Fund conference will contribute to the task force’s report, to be released in early 2018. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 5.Directions to the SSRC

    Directions to the SSRC View Larger Map The Social Science Research Council is located at One Pierrepont Plaza in Brooklyn, on the 15th floor. Our street address, according to Google Maps, is 300 Cadman Plaza West, just north of Pierrepont Street. We are near several subway stops. Detailed directions are available for trains arriving from Manhattan: 2, 3: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 2, 3) 4, 5: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 4, 5) A, C: High St/Brooklyn Bridge (detailed directions from the A, C) F: Jay St/Borough Hall (detailed directions from the F) R: Court St (detailed directions from the R) Upon entering the building, please show your ID to the front desk attendant, who will grant you access to the elevators. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. If you need any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact the front desk at 212-377-2700. Thank you! Our mailing address is: Social Science Research Council One Pierrepont Plaza, 15th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA P: 212-377-2700 | F: 212-377-2727 | E: info@ssrc.org Detailed Directions from Manhattan 2, 3 to Borough Hall: Use the stairs or escalator toward the rear of the train for the “Court Street and Montague Street” exit. Proceed through the turnstile then exit the station using the staircase on your right to Montague Street. Cross Montague Street toward TD Bank. Look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. To get there, keep walking North (straight) along Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Our main entrance has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. 4, 5 to Borough Hall: Use the staircase toward the middle of the platfrom for the “Borough Hall/Joralemon Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, follow signs toward Borough Hall. Proceed through turnstile then take the stairs furthest to your left. You will exit in front of Duane Reade. Walk north on Court Street (away from starbucks) past Remsen and Montague Streets. At Montague Street, Court Street becomes Cadman Plaza West. Continue north on Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Ours is the first building after Pierrepont Street, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. A, C to High St/Brooklyn Bridge: Use the stairs near the rear of the train for the “Cadman Plaza West, Cranberry Street, Henry Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, proceed to the bank of escalators and up. There is only one exit—when you emerge onto the sidewalk, you’ll be facing south on Cadman Plaza West. Continue straight ahead on Cadman, crossing Clark and Clinton streets. If you look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. F to Jay St/Borough Hall: Use the stairs toward the front of the train for the “Willoughby Street and Jay Street” exit. Walk north on Jay Street (past Metrotech Walk and Mrtyle Avenue) to Johnson Street, which will be the first possible left. Turn left onto Johnson and continue west toward Cadman Plaza West. If you look up, you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the buildin…

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  • 6.Creative Commons

    Creative Commons Except where otherwise noted, content published on or after January 1, 2014, on the SSRC’s public website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. This license permits you to copy, distribute, and display such content as long as you mention and link back to the SSRC, attribute the work appropriately (including both author and title), and do not adapt the content or use it commercially. For all undated content and all content published on the SSRC’s website prior to January 1, 2014, please contact the Council’s Communications Department to ensure that there are no legal restrictions on the use of the material in question. The information presented and opinions expressed in individual posts and comments on the SSRC’s website do not necessarily represent the views of the Social Science Research Council. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 7.Council News

    Subscribe to our Council Update E-Newsletter Manage your SSRC email subscription Council Update Archive 2019 ▾ September Experts will explore reparations at an October event presented with Brooklyn Historical Society, SSRC president Alondra Nelson cohosts a New Yorker Radio Hour segment on affirmative consent, a Mellon grant supports the HumetricsHSS initiative, and a new report explores the challenges of governing digital platforms. August The SSRC showcases its work at intersection of media, technology, and politics; the inaugural grantees of the New Interdisciplinary Projects in the Social Sciences are announced; a new essay series explores uncertainty in extreme weather; and the To Secure Knowledge report is presented at the American Sociological Association. July The Sloan Scholars Mentoring Network expands its reach and initiatives with a new grant, a new series spotlights the teams of scholars awarded Social Media and Democracy Research Grants, and former fellows reflect on the groundbreaking work of the decade-long Sexuality Research Fellowship Program. June The Claremont Colleges join the College and University Fund for the Social Sciences, Mary McDonnell to retire from SSRC June 30, and the SSRC launches an updated, expanded Items. May The Social Data Initiative announced the first Social Media and Democracy Research Grants recipients, Measure of America releases a new report and mapping tool, and the Strategic Learning and Evaluation program completes its comprehensive Vietnam project. April The Social Data Initiative issues its latest update, the SSRC’s Religion and Cuba programs receive new grants, Board member Margaret Levi is awarded the Skytte Prize, and Cheng Li joins the Visiting Committee. March The Social Data Initiative issues its February update, SSRC initiatives address timely topics, the Dissertation Proposal Development Program holds a faculty pedagogy workshop, and the InterAsian Connections conference spurs new scholarly publications. February Lorraine Daston delivers the inaugural SSRC Fellow Lecture, the Mellon Mays Program tackles the concerns of Black South African scholars, the SSRC Visiting Committee adds two new members, and the Social Data Initiative issues an update. January The Mellon Foundation awards the Council a $2.3 million grant to support the Transregional Collaboratory on the Indian Ocean, Lorraine Daston will deliver the inaugural SSRC Fellow Lecture on February 5, and the Scholarly Borderlands program explores the social aspects of climate change. 2018 ▾ December The SSRC awards the 2018 Hirschman Prize to Sheila Jasanoff at a ceremony in New York City, the To Secure Knowledge Task Force’s recent report was presented at an event in Washington, DC, Measure of America celebrates its 10th anniversary with a new report, and the Digital Culture program joined with other key stakeholders to explore persistent problems in open scholarship. November The 2018 Hirschman Prize Ceremony and Lecture takes place on November 30, the SSRC welcomes a new Board member, and Measure of America launches DATA2GOHEALTH.NYC. October A new Items series expores social science perspectives on gun violence, the SSRC establishes a book series with Cambridge University Press, a new initiative will examine the impact of disinformation, UVC launches a network for Congolese scholars, and an MOA report lays out the economic consequences of youth disconnection. September The To Secure Knowledge Task Force issues its final report, the SSRC announces a new partnership with the Brooklyn Historical Society, and Cyril Obi assumes leadership of the SSRC Africa Initiatives. August The SSRC will publish the report of its To Secure Knowledge Task Force next month, new partnerships support research and fellowships in Africa and Asia, the Digital Culture program launches SSRC Labs, and the Anxieties of Democracy program hosts panels and a reception at the APSA annual meeting. July The Social Data Initiative announces its first grant competition, SSRC president Alondra Nelson visits College and University Fund in…

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  • 8.Financials | About

    Financials 2018 Audited Financial Statements 2017 Audited Financial Statements Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 9.Mellon Mays Program Tackles Concerns of Black South African Scholars

    Mellon Mays Program Tackles Concerns of Black South African Scholars The SSRC’s Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program (MMGIP) supports Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF) fellows through their graduate school years and the professoriate. Its programming is a series of events that target critical junctures in this process. The annual Graduate Student Summer Conference, held on the campus of a Mellon member school, is an introduction to MMGIP, as well as to what fellows may encounter in their first through third years of graduate school. It is modeled, in part, upon a professional association conference. Prominent keynote speakers are invited, and fellows submit abstracts and, if selected, present their work in a paper session forum with feedback from our Mellon PhDs. As most fellows are in American graduate schools, that has been the focus. The MMGIP has over 750 PhD recipients and over 700 graduate students in PhD programs. The University of Cape Town (UCT) became a part of MMUF in 2001 and was joined by the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) and the University of the Western Cape (UWC) in 2008 and 2009, respectively. There are now over 20 South African Mellon PhDs and more than 180 graduate students in pursuit of advanced degrees. This population of fellows has reached a critical mass, with concerns about the academy that are universal, but also issues that are unique to South Africa. To give voice to their concerns and best serve this population of fellows, the program created a pilot Summer Conference for South African fellows to be held during the summer months in Cape Town. Over 40 South African Mellon fellows joined us January 29–31 for this event. While the conference followed the model of the Summer Conference traditionally held in the US, it was uniquely South African. The theme of the conference came from the fellows themselves, entitled “On Being a Black Academic in South Africa.” The conference began with the Benjamin E Mays Address, which is an opportunity for one of our more veteran fellows with a PhD to talk about their career, research, and Mellon experience. Dr. Nkosiyasi Dube, who entered MMUF in 2008 and is currently a lecturer in the Department of Social Work at the University of Witwatersrand, delivered an address that was deeply engaging to the fellows attending. He encouraged fellows to be confident in their work and in themselves as academics, remarking, “If you don’t say it, then no one will know it … whatever you do, don’t be comfortable in your corner—be confident and share [your work] …” He concluded his speech by commenting on the crucial role that Mellon’s support played in his current success. Quoting an African proverb, he said, “The axe that cuts a tree forgets, but the cut tree never [does].” The vice chancellors from Wits and UCT, as well as other professors and administrators from our South African institutions, joined the fellows at dinner for lively conversation and the building of new networks. While the South African Summer Conference followed the model of the US Summer Conference in that fellows were able to present their work on paper panels and get feedback, enjoy workshops on a variety of skills ranging from studying overseas to how to write abstracts and CVs, every participant was South African and affiliated with the Mellon program. This was a powerful example not only of the growth of MMUF in South Africa, but also of the growing production of knowledge from the global South. The keynote panel, “On Being a Black Scholar in South Africa,” included Dr. Abongwe Bangeni, co-ordinator of the Language Development Group at UCT’s Centre for Higher Education Development; Edwina Brooks, director of student development at UCT; and Dr. Sakhumzi Mfecane, department head of anthropology and sociology at UWC. The panelists spoke about issues that fellows wanted addressed. These included the decolonization of the academy; mindfulness of the space one occupies as a black scholar; finding one’s own voice and agency in these spaces; and suppor…

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  • 10.Announcing the Social Media and Democracy Research Grants

    Announcing the Social Media and Democracy Research Grants There is exciting news about the Social Data Initiative (SDI) of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), which is not only studying important dynamics in our society, but has the potential to shape the future of the social sciences. We launched the SDI in April to provide the social science research community with secure, reliable access to proprietary social media data. Today SSRC President Alondra Nelson announced, with Professors Gary King and Nate Persily, the first Request for Proposals (RFP) for the Social Media and Democracy Research Grants competition. In collaboration with Social Science One (SS1), an entity developed by Professors King and Persily, Facebook will make data available to independent social science researchers for the first time. Through the Social Media and Democracy Research Grants competition the SSRC will independently administer research funding, lead the peer review and data ethics review process, and work with SS1 to manage the research. We are proud to work with SS1 to make this important project a reality. Their direct role in handling the data and liaising with Facebook helps to ensure that all-important review and funding decisions remain independent of the company. The SSRC has engaged with SS1 in accordance with the core commitments of the SDI: the highest standards of academic scholarship, data privacy, harnessing the perspectives leading scholars from diverse geographies and backgrounds, and mobilizing knowledge for the public good. While there is no shortage of scholarly work on social media, the SDI has the potential to enable an unprecedented scale and scope of research. Scholars from all over the world, working with the same data and asking a broad set of questions about democracy and elections offers an opportunity to both build fields of study and come to meaningful conclusions about social processes globally. The SSRC extends its appreciation to the diverse group of funders who made the Social Media and Democracy Research Grants competition possible: Laura and John Arnold Foundation, The Democracy Fund, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, The Charles Koch Foundation, Omidyar Network, and The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. This vanguard project continues the SSRC’s ninety-five year tradition of marrying the endurance of rigorous social science with the flexibility of our skillset and the vision to apply it for the public good. Interested researchers are encouraged to submit proposals at apply.ssrc.org. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 11.To Secure Knowledge: A Task Force of the Social Science Research Council

    To Secure Knowledge: A Task Force of the Social Science Research Council The Social Science Research Council has launched “To Secure Knowledge,” a task force that is born from the organization’s essential obligations to scholarship, the infrastructure of social research, standards of inquiry and evidence, and the role rigorous understanding plays in public affairs. “To Secure Knowledge” builds on the SSRC’s history of utilizing the instrument of a task force from time to time to address particularly pressing concerns. The most recent was a Katrina Task Force that investigated the social dimensions of the response to Hurricane Katrina, as well as lessons that could be applied to similar disasters in the future. In this spirit, “To Secure Knowledge” will address five concerns that are tightly bound together: First is the scope, integrity, and accessibility of the federal statistical system. Vital data is presently generated by more than one-hundred federal agencies, but especially by thirteen whose primary mission is that of generating official statistics—Bureau of Economic Analysis; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Bureau of Transportation Statistics; Census Bureau; Economic Research Service; Energy Information Administration; National Agricultural Statistics Service; National Center for Education Statistics; National Center for Health Statistics; National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics; Office of Research, Evaluation and Statistics (SSA); and Statistics of Income (IRS)—as well as NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Various challenges, including potentially severe budgetary constraints, are putting pressure on this essential basis of scholarly and policy knowledge. Second is a set of concerns about the organizational arrangements for social research and policy knowledge. There is a wide range of essential institutions in both public and civil life that undergird the quest, across subjects and methods, for systematic understanding of human phenomena. These include our uncommonly robust network of colleges and universities, national endowments for the arts and humanities, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health, among many others. Without simply embracing the status quo, the task force will seek to understand how best to secure the institutional conditions for the creation, dissemination, and utilization of social knowledge. Third is the networks, patterns of interaction, and mobility of scholars. A great strength of the knowledge system of the United States has been its confident openness; characterized not only by a transparency of information and procedures, but by a global orientation that understands how the search for knowledge cannot be contained within any single country. For many decades, this approach has valued human exchanges, including the secure personal movement of scholars, and a quest for unimpeded collaboration. How can these valued practices be secured? Fourth is the set of norms, conventions, and patterns of behavior that long have characterized the ways in which the knowledge community has fashioned and governed its criteria for assessing careers and scholarly contributions, including systems of peer review. In a world increasingly characterized by liquid, instant, and uncurated information, largely autonomous, time-consuming, and demanding standard setting criteria and institutions within the scholarly world face growing skepticism. Which principles and which activities are most fundamental, and how, while open to adjustment, should they best be guarded, even as they are made more transparent? Fifth is changes to national policy that stress increased accountability for public funding, often linked to near term contributions of knowledge to national security and economic growth. This pressure affects the social sciences in ways that differ from the physical and health sciences, and thus requires careful attention to how responsibility is framed, the criteria by which various types…

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  • 12.Privacy Policy

    Privacy Policy Revised May 31, 2018 The Social Science Research Council (“we” or “us” or “our”) respects the privacy of our users (“user” or “you”). This Privacy Policy explains how we collect, use, disclose, and safeguard your personal information when you visit our website, www.ssrc.org, including any other media form, media channel, mobile website, or mobile application related or connected thereto (collectively, the “Site”). This Privacy Policy applies regardless of how you access the Site – whether by personal computers, mobile devices or otherwise. Please read this Privacy Policy carefully. BY VISITING THE SITE, YOU CONSENT TO OUR USING ANY INFORMATION THAT YOU PROVIDE TO US OR THAT WE COLLECT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THIS POLICY. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO THIS POLICY, DO NOT VISIT OR USE THIS SITE. GENERAL DATA PROTECTION REGULATION (EU) The General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) is a European Regulation concerning the use and processing of personal information. We are committed to processing your information in compliance with the GDPR. CHANGES TO THIS PRIVACY POLICY We reserve the right to make changes to this Privacy Policy at any time and for any reason. If and when we make material changes to this Privacy Policy, we will provide you with notice as appropriate under the circumstances by displaying a prominent notice within the Site or by sending you an email (if we have your email address). Please be sure to read any such notice carefully. You can tell that this Policy has been updated by checking the last revised date posted on the top of this page. Your continued use of the Site following the posting of changes to this Privacy Policy will mean that you accept those changes. Any changes or modifications will be effective immediately upon posting the updated Privacy Policy on the Site. COLLECTION OF YOUR INFORMATION We may collect information about you in a variety of ways. The information we may collect on the Site includes: Personal Data Personally identifiable information, such as your name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number, and demographic information, such as your age, gender, and interests, that you voluntarily give to us when you register with the Site (such as for grant applications, employment applications, program activities, or events) or when you choose to participate in various activities related to the Site (such as for email newsletter sign-up forms or surveys). You are under no obligation to provide us with personal information of any kind and you may visit and browse the information on the Site regardless of whether you furnish personal information. However, your refusal to provide personal information may prevent you from using certain features of the Site. Derivative Data Information our servers automatically collect when you access the Site, such as your IP address, your browser type, your operating system, your access times, and the pages you have viewed directly before and after accessing the Site. Financial Data Financial information, such as data related to your payment method (e.g., valid credit card number, card brand, expiration date) that we may collect when you submit an online donation. We store only very limited, if any, financial information that we collect. Otherwise, all financial information is stored by our payment processor, Authorize.net. You are encouraged to review their privacy policy and contact them directly with any questions. USE OF YOUR INFORMATION Having accurate information about you permits us to provide you with a smooth, efficient, and customized experience and further contributes to our charitable mission. Specifically, we may use information collected about you via the Site to: Create and manage your account. Compile anonymous statistical data and analysis for use internally or with third parties. Email you regarding your account. Enable user-to-user communications. Increase the efficiency and operation of the Site. Notify you of updates to the Site. Monitor and analyze usage and trend…

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  • 13.SSRC’s International Dissertation Research Fellowship Receives Grant Extension, Announces New Cohort

    SSRC’s International Dissertation Research Fellowship Receives Grant Extension, Announces New Cohort Mellon Foundation’s $4.6M Grant Funds Wide-Ranging, Worldwide Research Projects The International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF) program, for over 20 years a core component of the far-reaching work of the Social Science Research Council, has received a $4.6 million grant extension from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the program’s funder since its inception. The grant will fund the 2019 and 2020 fellowship competitions, each of which will select 70 fellows who will conduct research projects that will take them across academic disciplines, cultures, and borders and into new knowledge and discoveries in the humanistic social sciences and humanities. This grant will also fund related post-research workshops through June 2022, as well as focused IDRF outreach to institutions not frequently represented in the program, such as historically black colleges and universities and Hispanic-serving institutions. IDRF has also announced its 2018 cohort of 70 fellows, whose research projects encompass anthropology, archaeology, area and cultural studies, art and architectural history, ethnomusicology, film studies, geography, history, linguistics, political science, sociology, women’s and gender studies, and more. The 41 women and 29 men represent 24 public and private universities across the country, from Harvard to the University of California, Santa Cruz, and from the University of Michigan to Middle Tennessee State. IDRF is one of the few fellowships dedicated to supporting US-based scholars undertaking international research. In the tradition of the over 1,300 IDRF fellows that have preceded them, this new cohort will pursue research that will span the globe, with projects in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and North Africa, and South Asia. Moreover, 29 percent of 2018 IDRF fellows will conduct research that crosses or combines two or more of these regions. “From our beginnings nearly a century ago, the Council has been driven by its unflagging commitment to rigorous scholarship and research that expands social understanding and deepens knowledge globally and for the public good,” said SSRC president Alondra Nelson. “The IDRF fellows are central to that work and this 2018 cohort embodies this enduring cause, as well as the SSRC’s longstanding commitment to transnational research.” Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 14.Ford Foundation Funds China-Africa Peace Fellowship

    Ford Foundation Funds China-Africa Peace Fellowship The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) has received a $429,000 grant from the Ford Foundation to support the China-Africa Peace Fellowship, an initiative of the SSRC’s Understanding Violent Conflict program. This fellowship aims to strengthen the evidentiary basis for Chinese scholarship on the UN and in peace and security studies, foster greater South-South dialogue, and promote knowledge exchange between African and Chinese scholars, as well as integrate African and Chinese perspectives into key policy debates within the UN. Particularly critical to this latter process is the emphasis placed on networking with African civil society, which plays a key role in peace efforts across Africa. A 2016 cohort of the fellowship was supported by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to the SSRC’s China-Africa Knowledge Project, and was implemented in collaboration with the SSRC’s African Peacebuilding Network, the American Friends Service Committee China Office, and Beijing Foreign Studies University. The China-Africa Peace Fellowship is emblematic of the SSRC’s longstanding commitment to enhance international research collaborations and to produce knowledge for the public good. The Peace Fellowship will open its call for proposals in May 2018. China’s growing contributions to UN peace efforts and the concentration of UN peace operations in Africa suggest that cooperation between China, the African Union, and the United Nations will be essential to the success of future peace missions. By facilitating cooperation between African and Chinese scholars, this ground-breaking initiative will strengthen scholarship from both regions on questions of peace and security. Rigorous evidence-based scholarship will help policymakers engage more constructively with each other and help ensure that peace operations integrate lessons from the people and countries most affected by their work. Moreover, through discussions with scholars and practitioners in Africa and the United States as well as with UN officials, the Chinese fellows will receive significant feedback on their work and gain exposure to new perspectives of engagement with the UN in Africa, such as mediation and preventive diplomacy, and human rights monitoring as complements to China’s current contributions to international responses to conflict. By bringing together scholars and experts from China and Africa, the program thus hopes to open up new channels and opportunities for South-South learning, cooperation, and knowledge sharing in order to ensure the sustainability of scholarly dialogue between Chinese and Africans on issues of peace and security for decades to come. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 15.Employment

    Employment Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 16.A Message from Our President, Alondra Nelson

    A Message from Our President, Alondra Nelson I am proud and honored to have been selected by the Board of Directors to be the next president of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC). Succeeding Ira Katznelson at the helm is humbling. Ira’s vision and dedication since 2012 have poised the SSRC to forge new paths, in new ways, with new generations of scholars. In preparing to take up the baton from Ira, I have spent significant time discovering and reflecting on the rich history of the SSRC. For nearly a century the Council has demonstrated what thoughtful investment in research can yield. Since 1923, this organization has often proven the catalyst for groundbreaking research and scholarship, with Margaret Mead, E. Franklin Frazier, Charles Taylor, John Kenneth Galbraith, Koichi Hamada, Seymour Martin Lipset, Danilyn Rutherford, Ralph Bunche, Sean Decatur, several Nobel laureates, and one Secretary of State and Treasury among our alumni of fellows and collaborators. The SSRC of the past constitutes the baseline of our considerable achievements. But by no means is it a limit. Today’s SSRC builds upon this history every day, with an array of intellectual projects that tackle the nation’s and the world’s most pressing concerns. Among these are illiberal democracy, political polarization, economic and educational inequality, climate change, conflict and peacebuilding, digital culture, religion and the public sphere, and the higher education pipeline, with rigorous and pioneering research at the core of each. As you read this, members of the SSRC community are at work right now, on nearly every continent. Despite the near century of change, the SSRC has witnessed and, in no small measure, helped shape the pillar of our mission: advancing social science research for the public good. This singular purpose has constantly been revived and renewed and, over many decades, pursued in innovative ways. Through forging new partnerships across disciplines, divides, and borders, and creating diverse projects and initiatives that both anticipate and illuminate the pressing issues of our time, the work of the Council will continue to be renewed. We must ask the hard questions about the public good, reach new audiences, and communicate effectively and emphatically about the value and impact of social science scholarship. Some of our work will bring immediate results; more of our explorations of social science will require investment and investigation over time. This will be the future work of the SSRC. I am eager to work together to advance our shared cause, and would enjoy hearing from you. I am sure you have ideas on how the Council can meet the evolving needs of its wide-ranging constituencies; I look forward to collaborating with you and hearing your ideas. Feel free to email me.aside h5 {display:none;}; September 29, 2017 Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 17.Programs

    AREAS OF RESEARCH AND COLLABORATION The Council’s programs nurture the excellent, the experimental, and the innovative. Our work is currently organized around the following general themes: Digital Knowledge, Media & Data Economic & Social Policy Global & Regional Connections Governance, Democracy & Civil Society Health & Environment Higher Education Peace, Conflict & Security Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 18.Print & Digital

    Sharing New Knowledge The SSRC has published in the social sciences since 1929 and continues to shape the direction of scholarship and public policy through a wide range of books, reports, working papers, policy briefs, and articles. SSRC digital projects extend our tradition of engagement through rigorous inquiry, offering informed perspectives on topics of pressing concern and essential resources for researchers and practitioners. Digital projects include forums, essay collections, resource hubs, and exhibitions of our programmatic work. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 19.Who We Are | About

    Who We Are Better understanding makes for better choices. The SSRC is an international, interdisciplinary network of networks dedicated to galvanizing knowledge and mobilizing it for the public good. The Council is unique in scope and structure. It convenes scholars, practitioners, and policymakers while standing alongside the academy and public affairs. By supporting individual scholars, enhancing the capacity of institutions, generating new research, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens, the SSRC plays a vital role in efforts to build a more just and democratic world. The SSRC was founded in 1923 by visionaries in the fledgling fields of anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, sociology, and statistics. The organization was shaped by the need to cross the boundaries that separated these disciplines from each other, university scholarship from public affairs, and the social sciences from the humanities and the natural sciences. For more than ninety years, the SSRC has navigated these borders, emerging as both a pivotal force in the academy and a respected contributor to the public good. Today, our work remains focused on enhancing the capacity of scholars and institutions and on building research networks that cross regions and disciplines to produce and communicate new knowledge. View the SSRC Informational Brochure. [PDF] Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 20.New Leadership at Measure of America

    New Leadership at Measure of America Measure of America (MOA) has announced that Kristen Lewis, who has been co-director of the program with Sarah Burd-Sharps since they founded MOA in 2007, will lead the program as director. Since its founding, Measure of America has consistently produced provocative, data-driven reports on well-being and access to opportunity in the United States, user-friendly online data tools, and in-depth explorations of a range of crucial public issues, such as the spike in the rate of youth disconnection and the broad community benefits of increased investments in education. The breadth of MOA’s work has proven essential to elected officials and agencies at all levels of government, social service organizations, civic advocacy groups, philanthropic organizations, and the public at large, informing policymakers, legislators, and everyday people. “Sarah Burd-Sharps and Kristen Lewis forged a singularly effective collaboration that has proven immensely beneficial for communities across the United States,” said SSRC president Alondra Nelson. “I applaud Sarah for recognizing the power of the international human development approach for understanding challenges here in the US and thank her for her extraordinary contributions to the program’s success.” Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 21.Contact Us | About

    Contact Us Online Form - SSRC Contact Form Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 22.Historical Timeline | About

    Historical Timeline The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) has been in operation for more than ninety years. We present this timeline of organizational achievements and other highlights during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. For more detailed accounts of the SSRC’s history, see our one-page history of the SSRC and Social Science Research Council, 1923–1998. The SSRC’s records are stored in the Rockefeller Archive Center, Sleepy Hollow, New York. SSRC: 90 Years of Impact Early History 1923: Led by American Political Science Association president Charles E. Merriam, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) holds its inaugural meeting. 1924: The SSRC begins planning its first committees to study such topics as Interracial Relations, Scientific Aspects of Human Migration, and the Eighteenth Amendment. 1928: The Advisory Committee on Business Research, whose members include New York State Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, is founded, signaling the Council’s commitment to research on business practices, ethics, and industry relations. 1935: The SSRC establishes the Washington, DC–based Committee on Social Security. Its research is critical to the creation of the U.S. Social Security system. 1936: Ralph Bunche, Margaret Mead, and Grayson Kirk are among a cohort of scholars receiving fellowship support from the SSRC. 1937: The SSRC commissions 13 research memoranda to record and analyze the influence of the Great Depression on American society. Topics include crime, education, the family, internal migration, minorities, religion, consumption, health, and social work. 1942: With the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the National Research Council, the SSRC establishes the Committee on Latin American Studies. One of several new committees founded with the ACLS, it marks the beginning of the Council’s work focused on developing US expertise on world regions. 1945: George Gallup, Elmo Roper, and Frank Stanton are founding members of the Committee on Measurement of Opinion, Attitudes, and Consumer Wants, which examines problems of sampling, of biases introduced by interviewers, and of the use of panels of responses in repetitive surveys. Post–World War II 1947: Robert B. Hall publishes his influential Area Studies: With Special Reference to Their Implications for Research in the Social Sciences, sponsored by the SSRC’s Exploratory Committee on World Area Research. It warns of scholarly ignorance about many areas of the world and recommends a sweeping educational initiative. Within two years, committees on Slavic and East European Studies and Southern Asia are established. 1947: The SSRC publishes The Reduction of Intergroup Tensions: A Survey of Research on Problems of Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Group Relations. 1949: Future Nobel Prize winner Simon Kuznets chairs the SSRC’s Committee on Economic Growth, which for two decades shaped basic theory and quantitative research methods in economics. Over the next few decades, future Nobel laureates in economics would participate in the Council’s work in this area: Herbert Simon, Lawrence Klein, James Tobin, George Stigler, Franco Modigliani, and George Akerlof. Much more recently, Paul Krugman was involved in developing our work on the privatization of risk. 1954: The SSRC establishes the Committee on Comparative Politics, chaired by Gabriel Almond. It sponsors pioneering work in the area of modernization and development in the wake of decolonization. 1956: The SSRC creates the Committee on National Security Policy Research; members include Henry Kissinger. Subsequent Council programs covering international affairs topics attract the participation of other prominent foreign policy figures and commentators including John Lewis Gaddis, Zbigniew Brzezinski, McGeorge Bundy, Robert Keohane, William Pfaff, Condoleezza Rice, and George Shultz. 1959: The SSRC, with the ACLS, forms committees on Contemporary China, the Near and Middle East, and African Studies. 1961: Responding to breakthroughs in scientific research, the SSRC founds a committee on…

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  • 23.Fellowships

    Promoting innovative research worldwide Since 1923, the SSRC has awarded more than fifteen thousand fellowships to researchers around the globe. Council fellowship programs are strategic—they target specific problems, promote individual and institutional change, and expand networks. The SSRC’s varied fellowships and prizes share a core commitment to improving conditions for social science knowledge production worldwide. Programs engage themes ranging from global issues facing the United States and Japan to security in Africa and Latin America. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 24.Themes

    Interdisciplinary Topics and Fields of Work The Council’s roster of programs and activities is flexible and responsive to changes in the world around us. A research area that is critical today may have been emerging just a few years ago, and the scope of the SSRC’s work reflects the ever-changing nature of human life and society. Currently, our work is organized around these seven general themes. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 25.Get Involved

    SUPPORT THE SSRC Council programs support researchers, build worldwide capacity for knowledge production, and nurture innovation and excellence. For more than ninety years, these activities have been made possible by the generosity of our foundation, institutional, governmental, and individual partners. The need for rich and effective social science is urgent and persistent. As a proven incubator for new forms of inquiry, and as a connector and communicator of research and expertise, the SSRC plays a vital role in the work of building a more just society. Our donors are key partners in that work. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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