• 1.Programs

    AREAS OF RESEARCH AND COLLABORATION The Council’s programs nurture the excellent, the experimental, and the innovative. Our work is currently organized around the following general themes: Digital Knowledge, Media & Data Economic & Social Policy Global & Regional Connections Governance, Democracy & Civil Society Health & Environment Higher Education Peace, Conflict & Security.

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  • 2.Council News

    Subscribe to our Council Update E-Newsletter Name Email Subscribe Council Update Archive 2017 October Inaugural University Fund convening focuses on advancing social science, SSRC launches Media & Democracy initiative, and The Immanent Frame asks: Is this all there is? September A message from new SSRC president Alondra Nelson, the African Peacebuilding Network receives a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and the Abe Fellowship Program launches the Abe Fellows Global Forum. August The media looks to Northeast Asia Cooperative Security Project director Leon Sigal for North Korea policy expertise, SSRC president Ira Katznelson discusses affirmative action for whites in a New York Times op-ed, and The Immanent Frame website has a new look. JulyItems publishes new Democracy Papers, Northeast Asia Cooperative Security Project director Leon Sigal provides expert testimony on at a Senate subcommittee hearing on North Korea policy, and the African Peacebuilding Network announces its 2017 grantees. June The Council honors outgoing president Ira Katznelson, Measure of America launches its NYC Community Portraits website, and the InterAsia Program announces the 2017 recipients of the Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship. May Fellows and grantees share their stories on Research Matters, the Digital Culture program issues a call for Data Stories, and Measure of America is cited in the New York Times. April Amartya Sen accepts the 2016 Hirschman Prize at a ceremony at the Institute for Advanced Study, the Abe Fellowship Program announces its 2017 cohort, and Measure of America research informs a New York magazine piece. March Measure of America releases the latest report in its Youth Disconnection series, the DSD program cohost a panel on “Alternatives to Incarceration,” and CPPF publishes a new set of SSRC Working Papers. February The DPD Program announces its University Initiative partners, the SSRC names its next president, and the InterAsia Program launched a new website for its Transregional Virtual Research Institute. January Measure of America launches the Common Good Forecaster, APN holds a workshop for its 2016 cohort, and the IIAS-SSRC Winter School on Media Activism and Postcolonial Futures takes place at the Chinese University of Hong Kong 2016 December The SSRC publishes the seventh volume of the Advancing Transitional Justice Series, the APN co-organizes a policy roundtable, and Amartya Sen wins the 2016 Hirschman Prize. November The Abe Fellowship Program celebrates its 25th anniversary, Items launches a new series on “Reading Racial Conflict,” and Measure of America updates DATA2GO.NYC with the latest available data. 2015 November CPPF deputy director Tatiana Carayannis and IDRF fellow Louisa Lombard (2009) coedit Making Sense of the Central African Republic, the Anxieties of Democracy program hosts a lecture and dialogue on “Equality in a New Age of Inequalities,” and Measure of America announces the DATA2GO.NYC Visualization Challenge. OctoberThe SAGE Handbook of Research Management released; the inaugural Social Science After Hours to open with a presentation of DATA2GO.NYC by Measure of America; and the Carnegie Corporation profiles the Arab Council for the Social Sciences, headed by program director Seteney Shami. September Measure of America to launch DATA2GO.NYC; SSRC fellows publish books on Drugs, Thugs, and Diplomats: U.S. Policymaking in Colombia, and more; and The Immanent Frame looks at Cosmology and the Environment. July New reports reveal realities of race in America; The Decent City initiative cohosts an international debate in Barcelona, Spain; and the African Peacebuilding Network releases a policy brief on Nigeria’s 2015 elections. May IDRF Photo Competition winners; board member Margaret Levi elected to the National Academy of Sciences; and SSRC fellows publish books, from Remixing Reggaetón to The Killing Consensus, based on their fellowship research. AprilImplications of Normalization: Scholarly Perspectives on U.S.-Cuban Relations launches, The Immanent F…

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  • 3.Employment

    Employment.

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  • 4.Fellowships

    Promoting innovative research worldwide Since 1923, the SSRC has awarded more than fifteen thousand fellowships to researchers around the globe. Council fellowship programs are strategic—they target specific problems, promote individual and institutional change, and expand networks. The SSRC’s varied fellowships and prizes share a core commitment to improving conditions for social science knowledge production worldwide. Programs engage themes ranging from global issues facing the United States and Japan to security in Africa and Latin America.

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  • 5.First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science

    First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science The SSRC hosted thirty-five senior academic and administrative leaders from member institutions of its University Fund for the Social Sciences at a conference exploring challenges and opportunities for producing, sharing, and using insights from the social sciences. The University Fund is composed of institutions of higher education that support the work of the SSRC and share the vision that research is essential to advancing the public missions of scholars and scholarship. The October 16 convening was hosted by the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and was organized by a planning committee that included Peter Lange, of Duke University and the SSRC’s Board of Directors; Deborah Prentice, provost of Princeton University; Chase Robinson, president of the CUNY Graduate Center; and Alberta Sbragia, vice provost at the University of Pittsburgh. The program focused on the concerns of the SSRC’s To Secure Knowledge task force, created to recommend ways to protect and advance social science’s ability to contribute to scientific innovation and public problem-solving. The University Fund representatives examined the nature of higher education in our current moment, including doubts about claims to scientific expertise; the optimal institutional arrangements for the production of research and social policy; and the accessibility and integrity of scholarly, federal, and proprietary data systems for social research as well as the opportunities these systems present for scientific advancement and social impact. Suggestions emerging from the University Fund conference will contribute to the task force’s report, to be released in early 2018.

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  • 6.University Fund | About

    University Fund A Partnership to Advance Social Science Scholarship To mark its ninetieth anniversary, the Social Science Research Council established the University Fund for the Social Sciences, a consortium of higher education partners providing annual financial support to enhance the infrastructure of social science research, catalyze interdisciplinary and cross-institutional collaborations, and help launch the careers of junior scholars, who are offered fellowships, workshops, and mentorship. The following institutions have joined the fund in recognition of the significant role that the Council plays in sustaining innovation in scholarship, building networks across the world to address public issues, and communicating social knowledge. Arizona State University Boston College Brown University City University of New York, the Graduate Center Columbia University Cornell University Dartmouth College Duke University Emory University Georgetown University Harvard University Indiana University Johns Hopkins University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Michigan State University New York University Northwestern University Princeton University Rice University Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey Stanford University Stony Brook University, The State University of New York Swarthmore College The New School University of California, Berkeley University of California, Davis University of California, San Diego University of California, Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Southern California Vanderbilt University Yale University In partnership with this select group of leading colleges and universities, all deeply committed to the advancement of the social sciences, the Council works to enhance research and scholarship. An intellectual incubator, the SSRC serves as a platform for pioneering research, for new networks of cross-disciplinary and cross-sector collaboration, and for the production of social knowledge about important issues of public concern. Contact Info Kate Grantz, Executive Coordinator E-mail: grantz@ssrc.org Phone: 718-517-3613.

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  • 7.Creative Commons

    Creative Commons Except where otherwise noted, content published on or after January 1, 2014, on the SSRC’s public website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. This license permits you to copy, distribute, and display such content as long as you mention and link back to the SSRC, attribute the work appropriately (including both author and title), and do not adapt the content or use it commercially. For all undated content and all content published on the SSRC’s website prior to January 1, 2014, please contact the Council’s Communications Department to ensure that there are no legal restrictions on the use of the material in question. The information presented and opinions expressed in individual posts and comments on the SSRC’s website do not necessarily represent the views of the Social Science Research Council.

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  • 8.Print & Digital

    Sharing New Knowledge The SSRC has published in the social sciences since 1929 and continues to shape the direction of scholarship and public policy through a wide range of books, reports, working papers, policy briefs, and articles. SSRC digital projects extend our tradition of engagement through rigorous inquiry, offering informed perspectives on topics of pressing concern and essential resources for researchers and practitioners. Digital projects include forums, essay collections, resource hubs, and exhibitions of our programmatic work.

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  • 9.A Message from Our President, Alondra Nelson

    A Message from Our President, Alondra Nelson I am proud and honored to have been selected by the Board of Directors to be the next president of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC). Succeeding Ira Katznelson at the helm is humbling. Ira’s vision and dedication since 2012 have poised the SSRC to forge new paths, in new ways, with new generations of scholars. In preparing to take up the baton from Ira, I have spent significant time discovering and reflecting on the rich history of the SSRC. For nearly a century the Council has demonstrated what thoughtful investment in research can yield. Since 1923, this organization has often proven the catalyst for groundbreaking research and scholarship, with Margaret Mead, E. Franklin Frazier, Charles Taylor, John Kenneth Galbraith, Koichi Hamada, Seymour Martin Lipset, Danilyn Rutherford, Ralph Bunche, Sean Decatur, several Nobel laureates, and one Secretary of State and Treasury among our alumni of fellows and collaborators. The SSRC of the past constitutes the baseline of our considerable achievements. But by no means is it a limit. Today’s SSRC builds upon this history every day, with an array of intellectual projects that tackle the nation’s and the world’s most pressing concerns. Among these are illiberal democracy, political polarization, economic and educational inequality, climate change, conflict and peacebuilding, digital culture, religion and the public sphere, and the higher education pipeline, with rigorous and pioneering research at the core of each. As you read this, members of the SSRC community are at work right now, on nearly every continent. Despite the near century of change, the SSRC has witnessed and, in no small measure, helped shape the pillar of our mission: advancing social science research for the public good. This singular purpose has constantly been revived and renewed and, over many decades, pursued in innovative ways. Through forging new partnerships across disciplines, divides, and borders, and creating diverse projects and initiatives that both anticipate and illuminate the pressing issues of our time, the work of the Council will continue to be renewed. We must ask the hard questions about the public good, reach new audiences, and communicate effectively and emphatically about the value and impact of social science scholarship. Some of our work will bring immediate results; more of our explorations of social science will require investment and investigation over time. This will be the future work of the SSRC. I am eager to work together to advance our shared cause, and would enjoy hearing from you. I am sure you have ideas on how the Council can meet the evolving needs of its wide-ranging constituencies; I look forward to collaborating with you and hearing your ideas. Feel free to email me.aside h5 {display:none;}; September 29, 2017.

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  • 10.Executive Officers | About

    Executive Officers Working social scientists, the SSRC’s executive officers inspire and manage programming and operations with the counsel and oversight of the Board of Directors. Current Executive Officers ALONDRA NELSONPresident MARY BYRNE MCDONNELLExecutive Director RONALD KASSIMIR Executive Program Director A History of Leadership 1923–27 Charles E. Merriam (chairman) 1927–29 Wesley C. Mitchell (chairman) 1927–31 Robert S. Lynd (permanent secretary) 1929–31 Edwin B. Wilson (president) 1931–32 Robert S. Woodworth (president) 1931–45 Robert T. Crane (permanent secretary, 1931–32; executive director, 1932–45) 1945–48 Donald Young (executive director, 1945–47; president, 1948) 1948–68 Pendleton Herring (president) 1948–70 Paul Webbink (vice president) 1966–71 Henry W. Riecken (vice president, 1966–68; president, 1969–71) 1971–72 Ralph W. Tyler (acting president) 1972–79 Eleanor Bernert Sheldon (president) 1973–89 David L. Sills (executive associate) 1974–78 David Jenness (executive associate) 1979–85 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1985–86 Francis X. Sutton (interim president) 1986–89 Frederic E. Wakeman Jr. (president) 1988–89 David L. Szanton (executive associate) 1988–89 Richard C. Rockwell (executive associate) 1989–95 David L. Featherman (president) 1990–95 Stanley J. Heginbotham (vice president) 1995–98 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1997–present Mary Byrne McDonnell (executive program director, 1997–99; executive director, 1999–present) 1998–99 Orville (Bert) Brim Jr. (interim president) 1999–2012 Craig Calhoun (president) 2012–2017 Ira Katznelson (president) 2015–present Ronald Kassimir (executive program director) 2017–present Alondra Nelson (president).

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  • 11.Historical Timeline | About

    Historical Timeline The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) has been in operation for more than ninety years. We present this timeline of organizational achievements and other highlights during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. For more detailed accounts of the SSRC’s history, see our one-page history of the SSRC and Social Science Research Council, 1923–1998. The SSRC’s records are stored in the Rockefeller Archive Center, Sleepy Hollow, New York. SSRC: 90 Years of Impact Early History 1923: Led by American Political Science Association president Charles E. Merriam, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) holds its inaugural meeting. 1924: The SSRC begins planning its first committees to study such topics as Interracial Relations, Scientific Aspects of Human Migration, and the Eighteenth Amendment. 1928: The Advisory Committee on Business Research, whose members include New York State Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, is founded, signaling the Council’s commitment to research on business practices, ethics, and industry relations. 1935: The SSRC establishes the Washington, DC–based Committee on Social Security. Its research is critical to the creation of the U.S. Social Security system. 1936: Ralph Bunche, Margaret Mead, and Grayson Kirk are among a cohort of scholars receiving fellowship support from the SSRC. 1937: The SSRC commissions 13 research memoranda to record and analyze the influence of the Great Depression on American society. Topics include crime, education, the family, internal migration, minorities, religion, consumption, health, and social work. 1942: With the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the National Research Council, the SSRC establishes the Committee on Latin American Studies. One of several new committees founded with the ACLS, it marks the beginning of the Council’s work focused on developing US expertise on world regions. 1945: George Gallup, Elmo Roper, and Frank Stanton are founding members of the Committee on Measurement of Opinion, Attitudes, and Consumer Wants, which examines problems of sampling, of biases introduced by interviewers, and of the use of panels of responses in repetitive surveys. Post–World War II 1947: Robert B. Hall publishes his influential Area Studies: With Special Reference to Their Implications for Research in the Social Sciences, sponsored by the SSRC’s Exploratory Committee on World Area Research. It warns of scholarly ignorance about many areas of the world and recommends a sweeping educational initiative. Within two years, committees on Slavic and East European Studies and Southern Asia are established. 1947: The SSRC publishes The Reduction of Intergroup Tensions: A Survey of Research on Problems of Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Group Relations. 1949: Future Nobel Prize winner Simon Kuznets chairs the SSRC’s Committee on Economic Growth, which for two decades shaped basic theory and quantitative research methods in economics. Over the next few decades, future Nobel laureates in economics would participate in the Council’s work in this area: Herbert Simon, Lawrence Klein, James Tobin, George Stigler, Franco Modigliani, and George Akerlof. Much more recently, Paul Krugman was involved in developing our work on the privatization of risk. 1954: The SSRC establishes the Committee on Comparative Politics, chaired by Gabriel Almond. It sponsors pioneering work in the area of modernization and development in the wake of decolonization. 1956: The SSRC creates the Committee on National Security Policy Research; members include Henry Kissinger. Subsequent Council programs covering international affairs topics attract the participation of other prominent foreign policy figures and commentators including John Lewis Gaddis, Zbigniew Brzezinski, McGeorge Bundy, Robert Keohane, William Pfaff, Condoleezza Rice, and George Shultz. 1959: The SSRC, with the ACLS, forms committees on Contemporary China, the Near and Middle East, and African Studies. 1961: Responding to breakthroughs in scientific research, the SSRC founds a committee on…

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  • 12.General Terms of Use

    General Terms of Use The information presented and opinions expressed in comments and entries by individuals do not necessarily represent the views of the Social Science Research Council. Content published on the SSRC's public web site is free to be republished and/or redistributed, providing that the use is non-commercial and that the author and the SSRC are properly attributed. We prefer to have those interested in redistributing our web content online do so by publishing an excerpt and link to the full content on the SSRC web site, where it will be freely available, or at least that they include a link to the original content on the SSRC site. SSRC Forums Content For content published in our forums, we strongly recommend contacting the forum's editor/administrator to ensure that there are no other legal restrictions on the use of the material in question.

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  • 13.SSRC Fellows around the Globe

    SSRC Fellows around the Globe Note: This map presents recent SSRC fellows and grantees. For program information, see Fellowships and Grants. Make a Contribution to Scholarship SSRC fellowship recipients enrich our understanding of critical issues and help to navigate the space between research, policy, and practice. In addition to charting new knowledge, these researchers are engaging issues of pressing public concern and bringing fresh perspectives to global debates. SSRC fellowships make their work possible, and you can help. Please consider supporting tomorrow’s scholars by making a gift today. Your gift to the SSRC is a contribution to rigorous, innovative scholarship, and to ensuring that vital, accessible knowledge is brought to bear on issues that affect us all. Support the SSRC .button {background-color: #C99C57; border-color: #C99C57;} .button:hover {background-color: #e0a750}.

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  • 14.Who We Are | About

    Who We Are Better understanding makes for better choices. The SSRC is an international, interdisciplinary network of networks dedicated to galvanizing knowledge and mobilizing it for the public good. The Council is unique in scope and structure. It convenes scholars, practitioners, and policymakers while standing alongside the academy and public affairs. By supporting individual scholars, enhancing the capacity of institutions, generating new research, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens, the SSRC plays a vital role in efforts to build a more just and democratic world. The SSRC was founded in 1923 by visionaries in the fledgling fields of anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, sociology, and statistics. The organization was shaped by the need to cross the boundaries that separated these disciplines from each other, university scholarship from public affairs, and the social sciences from the humanities and the natural sciences. For more than ninety years, the SSRC has navigated these borders, emerging as both a pivotal force in the academy and a respected contributor to the public good. Today, our work remains focused on enhancing the capacity of scholars and institutions and on building research networks that cross regions and disciplines to produce and communicate new knowledge. View the SSRC Informational Brochure. [PDF].

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  • 15.Directions to the SSRC

    Directions to the SSRC View Larger Map The Social Science Research Council is located at One Pierrepont Plaza in Brooklyn, on the 15th floor. Our street address, according to Google Maps, is 300 Cadman Plaza West, just north of Pierrepont Street. We are near several subway stops. Detailed directions are available for trains arriving from Manhattan: 2, 3: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 2, 3) 4, 5: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 4, 5) A, C: High St/Brooklyn Bridge (detailed directions from the A, C) F: Jay St/Borough Hall (detailed directions from the F) R: Court St (detailed directions from the R) Upon entering the building, please show your ID to the front desk attendant, who will grant you access to the elevators. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. If you need any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact the front desk at 212-377-2700. Thank you! Our mailing address is: Social Science Research Council One Pierrepont Plaza, 15th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA P: 212-377-2700 | F: 212-377-2727 | E: info@ssrc.org Detailed Directions from Manhattan 2, 3 to Borough Hall: Use the stairs or escalator toward the rear of the train for the “Court Street and Montague Street” exit. Proceed through the turnstile then exit the station using the staircase on your right to Montague Street. Cross Montague Street toward TD Bank. Look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. To get there, keep walking North (straight) along Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Our main entrance has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. 4, 5 to Borough Hall: Use the staircase toward the middle of the platfrom for the “Borough Hall/Joralemon Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, follow signs toward Borough Hall. Proceed through turnstile then take the stairs furthest to your left. You will exit in front of Duane Reade. Walk north on Court Street (away from starbucks) past Remsen and Montague Streets. At Montague Street, Court Street becomes Cadman Plaza West. Continue north on Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Ours is the first building after Pierrepont Street, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. A, C to High St/Brooklyn Bridge: Use the stairs near the rear of the train for the “Cadman Plaza West, Cranberry Street, Henry Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, proceed to the bank of escalators and up. There is only one exit—when you emerge onto the sidewalk, you’ll be facing south on Cadman Plaza West. Continue straight ahead on Cadman, crossing Clark and Clinton streets. If you look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. F to Jay St/Borough Hall: Use the stairs toward the front of the train for the “Willoughby Street and Jay Street” exit. Walk north on Jay Street (past Metrotech Walk and Mrtyle Avenue) to Johnson Street, which will be the first possible left. Turn left onto Johnson and continue west toward Cadman Plaza West. If you look up, you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the buildin…

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  • 16.Privacy Policy

    Privacy Policy Identities of users of this Site are not anonymous, but names of users and personal identifying information about users will not be provided to any third parties. The Social Science Research Council does use IP addresses, domain information and other access statistics to analyze trends, administer the Site, track users’ movements, and gather broad demographic information for aggregate use. This information is not linked to personally identifiable information. The SSRC may share aggregated demographic information with third parties. Aggregate information is not linked to any personal information that can identify any individual person. This Privacy Policy applies to your use of sites under the domain www.ssrc.org and any other sub-domains of ssrc.org: fellowships.ssrc.org; programs.ssrc.org; etc. This Privacy Policy does not apply to your use of any affiliated or unaffiliated third-party sites to which the SSRC site may link. Subscription lists The SSRC web site provides subscription services, including e-mail based mailing lists. E-mail addresses collected in the maintenance of those lists are not shared with any person or organization outside of the SSRC. Subscription to any one mailing list is limited to that list only, unless the subscriber specifically requests additional subscriptions or correspondences. Exceptions In certain circumstances, and as exceptions to this Privacy Policy, we will, without notice to you, release specific information about you or your account to comply with any valid legal process such as a search warrant, subpoena, statute or court order, or in other special cases, such as, for example, an attempted breach of the security of the Site, or a physical threat to you or others. We may change this Privacy Policy from time to time to address new issues and reflect changes on this site, and as the need arises. All changes to this Privacy Policy will be posted here. Please refer to this Privacy Policy regularly. If you have any questions or concerns about this Privacy Policy, please send us an email at communications@ssrc.org.

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  • 17.Contact Us | About

    Contact Us Online Form - SSRC Contact Form.

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  • 18.Themes

    Interdisciplinary Topics and Fields of Work The Council’s roster of programs and activities is flexible and responsive to changes in the world around us. A research area that is critical today may have been emerging just a few years ago, and the scope of the SSRC’s work reflects the ever-changing nature of human life and society. Currently, our work is organized around these seven general themes.

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  • 19.Get Involved

    SUPPORT THE SSRC Council programs support researchers, build worldwide capacity for knowledge production, and nurture innovation and excellence. For more than ninety years, these activities have been made possible by the generosity of our foundation, institutional, governmental, and individual partners. The need for rich and effective social science is urgent and persistent. As a proven incubator for new forms of inquiry, and as a connector and communicator of research and expertise, the SSRC plays a vital role in the work of building a more just society. Our donors are key partners in that work.

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  • 20.Board of Directors | About

    Board of Directors The SSRC is governed by a board of directors made up of social scientists and practitioners from a broad range of disciplines and institutions. The board elects the SSRC president and regularly reviews the Council’s intellectual program. An executive committee of the board oversees financial and operational aspects. List of Board Members Julia Adams Professor of Sociology and International & Area StudiesYale University danah boyd Founder and PresidentData & Society John Seely Brown Visiting Scholar Advisor to the ProvostUniversity of Southern California Independent CochairmanDeloitte’s Center for the Edge Teresa P. R. Caldeira Professor of City and Regional Planning College of Environmental DesignUniversity of California, Berkeley Sandra Dawson (Chair, Executive Committee) KPMG Professor Emeritus of Management StudiesUniversity of Cambridge Isabelle de Lamberterie Director of Research EmeritaCentre National de la Recherche Scientifique Mamadou Diouf (Chair, Board of Directors) Leitner Family Professor of African Studies Director of the Institute of African StudiesColumbia University Michael Gellert General Partner and CofounderWindcrest Partners Edward Glaeser Professor of EconomicsHarvard University William H. Janeway Senior Advisor Managing DirectorWarburg Pincus Naomi R. Lamoreaux Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History Chair, Department of HistoryYale University Research AssociateNational Bureau of Economic Research Peter Lange Thomas A. Langford University Professor Professor of Political Science and Public PolicyDuke University Margaret Levi Director, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences Professor of Political ScienceStanford University Jere L. Bacharach Professor Emerita of International StudiesUniversity of Washington Sara Miller McCune Founder and Executive ChairmanSAGE Publishing Helen V. Milner Director, Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance B. C. Forbes Professor of Politics and International AffairsPrinceton University Peter Nager (Chair, Investment Committee) Senior Managing DirectorEgret Capital Partners Alondra Nelson (Ex Officio) PresidentSSRC Walter W. Powell Professor of Education and (by courtesy) Sociology, Organizational Behavior, Management Science and Engineering, Communication, and Public Policy Codirector, Center on Philanthropy and Civil SocietyStanford University José A. Scheinkman Edwin W. Rickert Professor of EconomicsColumbia University Barbara Stallings (Chair, Audit Committee) Professor of International Studies [Research] Watson InstituteBrown University Julia Adams Audit Committee Member Julia Adams is professor of sociology and international and area studies and master of Grace Hopper College at Yale University. She teaches and conducts research in the areas of state development, social theory and public knowledge, gender/family, early modern European politics, and colonialism and empire. Her monograph The Familial State: Ruling Families and Merchant Capitalism in Early Modern Europe (Cornell, 2005) won the Gaddis Smith International Book Prize. She coedited Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire (Emerald, 2015); “Patrimonial Power in the Modern World,” a 2011 special issue of the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science; and Remaking Modernity: Politics, History, and Sociology (Duke, 2005). Her work has twice won the Barrington Moore Jr. Award for best article, given by the American Sociological Association (ASA) section in Comparative and Historical Sociology. In 2013, Adams was awarded a National Science Foundation grant for collaborative research on Wikipedia and the democratization of academic knowledge. Adams graduated from Reed College and did her graduate work at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She served as 2008–2009 president of the Social Science History Association and 2012–2013 chair of the ASA Global and Transnational section. At Yale, she has chaired the department of sociology and the International Affairs Council and directed the Division of the Social Sciences. She has also se…

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  • 21.Council Update

    Council Update Subscribe to our Council Update E-Newsletter Name Email Subscribe.

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  • 22.To Secure Knowledge: A Task Force of the Social Science Research Council

    To Secure Knowledge: A Task Force of the Social Science Research Council The Social Science Research Council is launching “To Secure Knowledge,” a task force that is born from the organization’s essential obligations to scholarship, the infrastructure of social research, standards of inquiry and evidence, and the role rigorous understanding plays in public affairs. The task force’s membership includes Lorraine Daston (director, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, and recurring Visiting Professor of Social Thought and History at the University of Chicago), Bernadette Gray-Little (chancellor, University of Kansas), Rush Holt (former member of Congress who is chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science), Gary King (a Harvard University political scientist who directs that university’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science), Cora Marrett (a University of Wisconsin sociologist who has been deputy director at NSF), Kenneth Prewitt (a former SSRC president who headed the US Census Bureau at the close of the Clinton administration and presently is a professor of public policy at Columbia University), John Reed (the former CEO at Citibank, a recent member of the SSRC board, and a former chair of the boards of the Russell Sage Foundation, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. and MIT), and Amy Zegart (co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford, and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution). The current SSRC president, Ira Katznelson, and the incoming president, Alondra Nelson (currently dean of social science at Columbia University), serve ex officio. “To Secure Knowledge” builds on the SSRC’s history of utilizing the instrument of a task force from time to time to address particularly pressing concerns. The most recent was a Katrina Task Force that investigated the social dimensions of the response to Hurricane Katrina, as well as lessons that could be applied to similar disasters in future. In this spirit, “To Secure Knowledge” will address five concerns that are tightly bound together: First is the scope, integrity, and accessibility of the federal statistical system. Vital data is presently generated by more than one-hundred federal agencies, but especially by thirteen whose primary mission is that of generating official statistics—Bureau of Economic Analysis; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Bureau of Transportation Statistics; Census Bureau; Economic Research Service; Energy Information Administration; National Agricultural Statistics Service; National Center for Education Statistics; National Center for Health Statistics; National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics; Office of Research, Evaluation and Statistics (SSA); and Statistics of Income (IRS)—as well as NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Various challenges, including potentially severe budgetary constraints, are putting pressure on this essential basis of scholarly and policy knowledge. Second is a set of concerns about the organizational arrangements for social research and policy knowledge. There is a wide range of essential institutions in both public and civil life that undergird the quest, across subjects and methods, for systematic understanding of human phenomena. These include our uncommonly robust network of colleges and universities, national endowments for the arts and humanities, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health, among many others. Without simply embracing the status quo, the task force will seek to understand how best to secure the institutional conditions for the creation, dissemination, and utilization of social knowledge. Third is the networks, patterns of interaction, and mobility of scholars. A great strength of the knowledge system of the United States has been its confident openness; characterized not only by a transparency of information and procedures, but by a global orientation that understan…

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  • 23.Mission | About

    The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization founded in 1923. It fosters innovative research, nurtures new generations of social scientists, deepens how inquiry is practiced within and across disciplines, and mobilizes necessary knowledge on important public issues. The SSRC is guided by the belief that justice, prosperity, and democracy all require better understanding of complex social, cultural, economic, and political processes. We work with practitioners, policymakers, and academic researchers in the social sciences, related professions, and the humanities and natural sciences. We build interdisciplinary and international networks, working with partners around the world to link research to practice and policy, strengthen individual and institutional capacities for learning, and enhance public access to information. Basic Commitments The SSRC approaches its work guided by five basic commitments: Fostering innovation. We work on problems that need new approaches; we act as a catalyst for new thinking. We seek to mobilize the most creative and knowledgeable researchers and to help research institutions be more dynamic. Renewing existing expertise, putting knowledge to work on new problems, and generating novel data and theories are all crucial to advancing social science for the public good. Investing in the future. We ensure the future of knowledge production through nurturing new generations of researchers, enabling practitioners to act on scientific knowledge, enhancing cross-fertilization among intellectual fields, developing capacity where it is most lacking, and facilitating the internationalization of social science. Working internationally and democratically. Better understanding of basic social processes is a resource for improving the lives of all. It should be available to all. Participation in the production of scientific knowledge should also be as broad as possible. We support the internationalization of social science and opportunities for under-represented groups both as matters of equity and as requirements for ensuring that the production of knowledge is informed by different contexts and perspectives. Combining urgency and patience. We bring researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and broader publics together to focus on topics of pressing public importance from health to human rights. But since even the most urgent problems are seldom solved overnight, we must learn even as we act, and we must continually renew existing knowledge. Keeping standards high. Practical action, policy, and debate on major public issues all need to be informed by the best possible knowledge. This is produced by emphasizing scientific quality, engaging important public questions, and ensuring openness to critical analysis. Theory and research can then command the attention of those who approach practical issues with different values or agendas.

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  • 24.Financials | About

    Financials 2016 Audited Financial Statements2015 Audited Financial Statements.

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  • 25.How We Work | About

    How We Work SSRC staff and scholars work to gather knowledge and communicate its implications for debate and public use. As we partner with institutions and scholars around the world, the Council offers an independent space for collaboration and an unbiased voice for social science. Through research networks and committees, workshops and conferences, summer training institutes and fellowships, scholarly exchanges and publications, the Council enhances the conditions for knowledge production worldwide. The SSRC’s organizational capacities focus on four intersecting purposes: Supporting Innovation in Social Science Scholarship By connecting disciplines and methods, the SSRC advances fresh ways to inquire, expand, and integrate the craft of social science. Building Interdisciplinary and International Networks to Address Public Issues The Council’s experience and standing allow it to convene leading researchers and practitioners—from policymakers and UN leaders, to architects and artists, to journalists and activists—to generate new knowledge and explore solutions to pressing public matters. Nurturing Scholars and Strengthening Institutions Through fellowships, workshops, and mentorship, the SSRC identifies and supports the most promising young professionals across the social sciences. While supporting individual scholars, the SSRC is also deeply committed to improving worldwide conditions for knowledge production at an institutional level through capacity building, resource sharing, and networking. Communicating and Explaining Social Knowledge Relying upon diverse forms ranging from books and digital forums to conferences and public events, the Council seeks to deepen the comprehension of social science by journalists, policymakers, practitioners, and citizens. Through strengthening institutions and exploring digital frontiers, we also work to expand scholarly access to knowledge, particularly in arenas where access has traditionally been limited. Tools Graduate and postgraduate fellowships Convening policymakers and scholars Cross-disciplinary engagement and innovation Conferences and workshops Mentorship for young scholars Books and other publications Digital forums and resources Lectures and public events.

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