• 26.Mary McDonnell Named Senior Vice President for Strategic Learning and Special Initiatives

    Mary McDonnell Named Senior Vice President for Strategic Learning and Special Initiatives Mary Byrne McDonnell has been named senior vice president for strategic learning and special initiatives at the Social Science Research Council. In this important new role, she will oversee the Council’s Strategic Learning and Evaluation portfolio, leading partnerships with the Atlantic Philanthropies, the Mastercard Foundation, and other collaborators in Asia, Australia, Africa, and North America, while developing new ones. In addition, she retains her portfolio of capacity-strengthening work in Japan and Vietnam. McDonnell will also continue to bring her broad expertise and insight to the Council’s work, serving as a vital member of the leadership team and advising the president on a range of issues. The SSRC’s Strategic Learning and Evaluation portfolio was developed by McDonnell beginning in 2006. Beginning with widely praised work in Vietnam, McDonnell and her team established an innovative set of tools that bring a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods to bear on leadership training, professional development, and organizational learning. This approach generates insights that improve programmatic and organizational effectiveness, including processes, outcomes, and impact. McDonnell began full-time work at the Council in 1986 and has made major contributions in a wide range of areas, including directing the East Asia Program, founding and leading the Abe Fellowship and Vietnam Programs, and developing the Human Capital Initiative. She was appointed executive program director in 1997 and executive director in 2000, playing a central role in the Council’s management and administration. McDonnell received a PhD in history from Columbia University, with a focus on transnational connections between Southeast Asia and the Middle East. She has master’s degrees in both international affairs and journalism, also from Columbia, and worked as a journalist covering Asian and Middle Eastern affairs before joining the Council. She is coeditor (with Robert Dingwall) of The SAGE Handbook of Research Management. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 27.Where We Work | About

    Where We Work With headquarters in Brooklyn, New York, the SSRC partners with scholars, academic institutions, NGOs, and governmental bodies across the world. Council activities and networks span more than 80 countries on 6 continents. Learn more about SSRC Programs. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 28.Mission | About

    The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization founded in 1923. It fosters innovative research, nurtures new generations of social scientists, deepens how inquiry is practiced within and across disciplines, and mobilizes necessary knowledge on important public issues. The SSRC is guided by the belief that justice, prosperity, and democracy all require better understanding of complex social, cultural, economic, and political processes. We work with practitioners, policymakers, and academic researchers in the social sciences, related professions, and the humanities and natural sciences. We build interdisciplinary and international networks, working with partners around the world to link research to practice and policy, strengthen individual and institutional capacities for learning, and enhance public access to information. Basic Commitments The SSRC approaches its work guided by five basic commitments: Fostering innovation. We work on problems that need new approaches; we act as a catalyst for new thinking. We seek to mobilize the most creative and knowledgeable researchers and to help research institutions be more dynamic. Renewing existing expertise, putting knowledge to work on new problems, and generating novel data and theories are all crucial to advancing social science for the public good. Investing in the future. We ensure the future of knowledge production through nurturing new generations of researchers, enabling practitioners to act on scientific knowledge, enhancing cross-fertilization among intellectual fields, developing capacity where it is most lacking, and facilitating the internationalization of social science. Working internationally and democratically. Better understanding of basic social processes is a resource for improving the lives of all. It should be available to all. Participation in the production of scientific knowledge should also be as broad as possible. We support the internationalization of social science and opportunities for under-represented groups both as matters of equity and as requirements for ensuring that the production of knowledge is informed by different contexts and perspectives. Combining urgency and patience. We bring researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and broader publics together to focus on topics of pressing public importance from health to human rights. But since even the most urgent problems are seldom solved overnight, we must learn even as we act, and we must continually renew existing knowledge. Keeping standards high. Practical action, policy, and debate on major public issues all need to be informed by the best possible knowledge. This is produced by emphasizing scientific quality, engaging important public questions, and ensuring openness to critical analysis. Theory and research can then command the attention of those who approach practical issues with different values or agendas. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 29.SSRC Fellows around the Globe

    SSRC Fellows around the Globe Note: This map presents recent SSRC fellows and grantees. For program information, see Fellowships and Grants. Make a Contribution to Scholarship SSRC fellowship recipients enrich our understanding of critical issues and help to navigate the space between research, policy, and practice. In addition to charting new knowledge, these researchers are engaging issues of pressing public concern and bringing fresh perspectives to global debates. SSRC fellowships make their work possible, and you can help. Please consider supporting tomorrow’s scholars by making a gift today. Your gift to the SSRC is a contribution to rigorous, innovative scholarship, and to ensuring that vital, accessible knowledge is brought to bear on issues that affect us all. Support the SSRC .button {background-color: #C99C57; border-color: #C99C57;} .button:hover {background-color: #e0a750} Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 30.First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science

    First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science The SSRC hosted thirty-five senior academic and administrative leaders from member institutions of its University Fund for the Social Sciences at a conference exploring challenges and opportunities for producing, sharing, and using insights from the social sciences. The University Fund is composed of institutions of higher education that support the work of the SSRC and share the vision that research is essential to advancing the public missions of scholars and scholarship. The October 16 convening was hosted by the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and was organized by a planning committee that included Peter Lange, of Duke University and the SSRC’s Board of Directors; Deborah Prentice, provost of Princeton University; Chase Robinson, president of the CUNY Graduate Center; and Alberta Sbragia, vice provost at the University of Pittsburgh. The program focused on the concerns of the SSRC’s To Secure Knowledge task force, created to recommend ways to protect and advance social science’s ability to contribute to scientific innovation and public problem-solving. The University Fund representatives examined the nature of higher education in our current moment, including doubts about claims to scientific expertise; the optimal institutional arrangements for the production of research and social policy; and the accessibility and integrity of scholarly, federal, and proprietary data systems for social research as well as the opportunities these systems present for scientific advancement and social impact. Suggestions emerging from the University Fund conference will contribute to the task force’s report, to be released in early 2018. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 31.Historical Timeline | About

    Historical Timeline The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) has been in operation for more than ninety years. We present this timeline of organizational achievements and other highlights during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. For more detailed accounts of the SSRC’s history, see our one-page history of the SSRC and Social Science Research Council, 1923–1998. The SSRC’s records are stored in the Rockefeller Archive Center, Sleepy Hollow, New York. SSRC: 90 Years of Impact Early History 1923: Led by American Political Science Association president Charles E. Merriam, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) holds its inaugural meeting. 1924: The SSRC begins planning its first committees to study such topics as Interracial Relations, Scientific Aspects of Human Migration, and the Eighteenth Amendment. 1928: The Advisory Committee on Business Research, whose members include New York State Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, is founded, signaling the Council’s commitment to research on business practices, ethics, and industry relations. 1935: The SSRC establishes the Washington, DC–based Committee on Social Security. Its research is critical to the creation of the U.S. Social Security system. 1936: Ralph Bunche, Margaret Mead, and Grayson Kirk are among a cohort of scholars receiving fellowship support from the SSRC. 1937: The SSRC commissions 13 research memoranda to record and analyze the influence of the Great Depression on American society. Topics include crime, education, the family, internal migration, minorities, religion, consumption, health, and social work. 1942: With the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the National Research Council, the SSRC establishes the Committee on Latin American Studies. One of several new committees founded with the ACLS, it marks the beginning of the Council’s work focused on developing US expertise on world regions. 1945: George Gallup, Elmo Roper, and Frank Stanton are founding members of the Committee on Measurement of Opinion, Attitudes, and Consumer Wants, which examines problems of sampling, of biases introduced by interviewers, and of the use of panels of responses in repetitive surveys. Post–World War II 1947: Robert B. Hall publishes his influential Area Studies: With Special Reference to Their Implications for Research in the Social Sciences, sponsored by the SSRC’s Exploratory Committee on World Area Research. It warns of scholarly ignorance about many areas of the world and recommends a sweeping educational initiative. Within two years, committees on Slavic and East European Studies and Southern Asia are established. 1947: The SSRC publishes The Reduction of Intergroup Tensions: A Survey of Research on Problems of Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Group Relations. 1949: Future Nobel Prize winner Simon Kuznets chairs the SSRC’s Committee on Economic Growth, which for two decades shaped basic theory and quantitative research methods in economics. Over the next few decades, future Nobel laureates in economics would participate in the Council’s work in this area: Herbert Simon, Lawrence Klein, James Tobin, George Stigler, Franco Modigliani, and George Akerlof. Much more recently, Paul Krugman was involved in developing our work on the privatization of risk. 1954: The SSRC establishes the Committee on Comparative Politics, chaired by Gabriel Almond. It sponsors pioneering work in the area of modernization and development in the wake of decolonization. 1956: The SSRC creates the Committee on National Security Policy Research; members include Henry Kissinger. Subsequent Council programs covering international affairs topics attract the participation of other prominent foreign policy figures and commentators including John Lewis Gaddis, Zbigniew Brzezinski, McGeorge Bundy, Robert Keohane, William Pfaff, Condoleezza Rice, and George Shultz. 1959: The SSRC, with the ACLS, forms committees on Contemporary China, the Near and Middle East, and African Studies. 1961: Responding to breakthroughs in scientific research, the SSRC founds a committee on…

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  • 32.Programs

    AREAS OF RESEARCH AND COLLABORATION The Council’s programs nurture the excellent, the experimental, and the innovative. Our work is currently organized around the following general themes: Media, Technology & Politics Economic & Social Policy Global & Regional Connections Governance, Democracy & Civil Society Health & Environment Higher Education Peace, Conflict & Security Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 33.An American Dilemma for the 21st Century

    An American Dilemma for the 21st Century On Wednesday, October 30, 2019 nearly two-hundred scholars, leaders, and community members gathered at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture for “An American Dilemma for the 21st Century,” a day-long conference marking the seventy-fifth anniversary of Gunnar Mydral’s An American Dilemma: The Negro Problem and Modern Democracy and the launch of a digital platform expanding access to the Carnegie-Myrdal research archive. Published in 1944 by Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal, An American Dilemma remains a seminal text for understanding racism in the United States during the twentieth century. For Myrdal and his collaborators, the central dilemma was the unresolved tension of the “American creed”—the celebration of ideals of equal opportunity and democracy, in the face of deep racial discrimination and inequality. An American Dilemma helped to expose the immoral hypocrisy of legalized anti-Black racism in the US, and informed critical civil rights victories in the post-war era, such as the Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education. While Myrdal has, deservedly, received considerable praise for the work, lesser-known are the dozens of social scientists who contributed to the publication and its foundational study. Commissioned by Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Carnegie-Myrdal Study of the Negro in America includes twenty-nine memoranda written by Myrdal and scholars such as Ralph Bunche, Margaret Brenman, E. Franklin Frazier, Ruth Landes, and S. U. Etuk. Given the increased visibility of racial antagonism and violence in recent years, coupled with the reemergence of Black-led protests in the aftermath of #BlackLivesMatter, the “American Dilemma for the 21st Century” conference offered an occasion to revisit and reassess the “American creed” and its surrounding tensions. Throughout the day, panelists explored the multifaceted force of anti-Black racism in the US. In discussions on housing, the economy, policing, and education, the day’s speakers unpacked both historical and contemporary fissures between opportunity and exclusion. Panelists also offered rich reflections on An American Dilemma itself, and offered critiques of the sociopolitical context that motivated the project’s commissioning, author selection, and crafted presentation toward white audiences; many noting the already substantial body of research from Black scholars like W. E. B. Du Bois. As the conference also served as a launch event for the newly digitized Carnegie-Myrdal research archive, attendees also heard from the creative and curatorial team behind the platform’s design. In a session titled “Out of the Archives,” Christopher Paul Harris, Jonathan Jackson (WeShouldDoItAll), and Myriah Towner demonstrated the platform’s capabilities and described the process of translating a text-heavy archive into a dynamic, attractive, and navigable tool “that anyone can use.” Featured in the demo were memoranda from the study’s “hidden figures,” including downloadable copies of original materials housed at the Schomburg Center. To close the program, SSRC president Alondra Nelson engaged Professors Jelani Cobb and Phillip Atiba Goff in a stirring conversation that crystallized the importance of historical data in working to remedy both foundational and symptomatic instances of injustice. Echoing remarks made by Dr. Rajiv Sethi in an earlier panel, Dr. Goff encouraged the audience to visit the new Carnegie-Myrdal digital archive, pointing specifically to Raper’s memo. Rich in police data about the use of deadly force, officer and suspect demographics, as well as first-hand interviews, Raper’s memo, according to Goff, offers a unique opportunity to explore theoretical explanations of racial disparities in policing that deviate from popular narratives and interventions focused on “hearts and minds” rather than malignant structural configurations. In all of the day’s presentations and discussions, the need for leveraging historical data in designin…

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  • 34.Financials | About

    Financials 2019 Audited Financial Statements 2018 Audited Financial Statements 2017 Audited Financial Statements Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 35.Employment

    Employment Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 36.A Message from Our President, Alondra Nelson

    A Message from Our President, Alondra Nelson I am proud and honored to have been selected by the Board of Directors to be the next president of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC). Succeeding Ira Katznelson at the helm is humbling. Ira’s vision and dedication since 2012 have poised the SSRC to forge new paths, in new ways, with new generations of scholars. In preparing to take up the baton from Ira, I have spent significant time discovering and reflecting on the rich history of the SSRC. For nearly a century the Council has demonstrated what thoughtful investment in research can yield. Since 1923, this organization has often proven the catalyst for groundbreaking research and scholarship, with Margaret Mead, E. Franklin Frazier, Charles Taylor, John Kenneth Galbraith, Koichi Hamada, Seymour Martin Lipset, Danilyn Rutherford, Ralph Bunche, Sean Decatur, several Nobel laureates, and one Secretary of State and Treasury among our alumni of fellows and collaborators. The SSRC of the past constitutes the baseline of our considerable achievements. But by no means is it a limit. Today’s SSRC builds upon this history every day, with an array of intellectual projects that tackle the nation’s and the world’s most pressing concerns. Among these are illiberal democracy, political polarization, economic and educational inequality, climate change, conflict and peacebuilding, digital culture, religion and the public sphere, and the higher education pipeline, with rigorous and pioneering research at the core of each. As you read this, members of the SSRC community are at work right now, on nearly every continent. Despite the near century of change, the SSRC has witnessed and, in no small measure, helped shape the pillar of our mission: advancing social science research for the public good. This singular purpose has constantly been revived and renewed and, over many decades, pursued in innovative ways. Through forging new partnerships across disciplines, divides, and borders, and creating diverse projects and initiatives that both anticipate and illuminate the pressing issues of our time, the work of the Council will continue to be renewed. We must ask the hard questions about the public good, reach new audiences, and communicate effectively and emphatically about the value and impact of social science scholarship. Some of our work will bring immediate results; more of our explorations of social science will require investment and investigation over time. This will be the future work of the SSRC. I am eager to work together to advance our shared cause, and would enjoy hearing from you. I am sure you have ideas on how the Council can meet the evolving needs of its wide-ranging constituencies; I look forward to collaborating with you and hearing your ideas. Feel free to email me.aside h5 {display:none;}; September 29, 2017 Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 37.Directions to the SSRC

    Directions to the SSRC View Larger Map The Social Science Research Council is located at One Pierrepont Plaza in Brooklyn, on the 15th floor. Our street address, according to Google Maps, is 300 Cadman Plaza West, just north of Pierrepont Street. We are near several subway stops. Detailed directions are available for trains arriving from Manhattan: 2, 3: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 2, 3) 4, 5: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 4, 5) A, C: High St/Brooklyn Bridge (detailed directions from the A, C) F: Jay St/Borough Hall (detailed directions from the F) R: Court St (detailed directions from the R) Upon entering the building, please show your ID to the front desk attendant, who will grant you access to the elevators. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. If you need any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact the front desk at 212-377-2700. Thank you! Our mailing address is: Social Science Research Council One Pierrepont Plaza, 15th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA P: 212-377-2700 | F: 212-377-2727 | E: info@ssrc.org Detailed Directions from Manhattan 2, 3 to Borough Hall: Use the stairs or escalator toward the rear of the train for the “Court Street and Montague Street” exit. Proceed through the turnstile then exit the station using the staircase on your right to Montague Street. Cross Montague Street toward TD Bank. Look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. To get there, keep walking North (straight) along Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Our main entrance has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. 4, 5 to Borough Hall: Use the staircase toward the middle of the platfrom for the “Borough Hall/Joralemon Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, follow signs toward Borough Hall. Proceed through turnstile then take the stairs furthest to your left. You will exit in front of Duane Reade. Walk north on Court Street (away from starbucks) past Remsen and Montague Streets. At Montague Street, Court Street becomes Cadman Plaza West. Continue north on Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Ours is the first building after Pierrepont Street, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. A, C to High St/Brooklyn Bridge: Use the stairs near the rear of the train for the “Cadman Plaza West, Cranberry Street, Henry Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, proceed to the bank of escalators and up. There is only one exit—when you emerge onto the sidewalk, you’ll be facing south on Cadman Plaza West. Continue straight ahead on Cadman, crossing Clark and Clinton streets. If you look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. F to Jay St/Borough Hall: Use the stairs toward the front of the train for the “Willoughby Street and Jay Street” exit. Walk north on Jay Street (past Metrotech Walk and Mrtyle Avenue) to Johnson Street, which will be the first possible left. Turn left onto Johnson and continue west toward Cadman Plaza West. If you look up, you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the buildin…

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  • 38.How We Work | About

    How We Work SSRC staff and scholars work to gather knowledge and communicate its implications for debate and public use. As we partner with institutions and scholars around the world, the Council offers an independent space for collaboration and an unbiased voice for social science. Through research networks and committees, workshops and conferences, summer training institutes and fellowships, scholarly exchanges and publications, the Council enhances the conditions for knowledge production worldwide. The SSRC’s organizational capacities focus on four intersecting purposes: Supporting Innovation in Social Science Scholarship By connecting disciplines and methods, the SSRC advances fresh ways to inquire, expand, and integrate the craft of social science. Building Interdisciplinary and International Networks to Address Public Issues The Council’s experience and standing allow it to convene leading researchers and practitioners—from policymakers and UN leaders, to architects and artists, to journalists and activists—to generate new knowledge and explore solutions to pressing public matters. Nurturing Scholars and Strengthening Institutions Through fellowships, workshops, and mentorship, the SSRC identifies and supports the most promising young professionals across the social sciences. While supporting individual scholars, the SSRC is also deeply committed to improving worldwide conditions for knowledge production at an institutional level through capacity building, resource sharing, and networking. Communicating and Explaining Social Knowledge Relying upon diverse forms ranging from books and digital forums to conferences and public events, the Council seeks to deepen the comprehension of social science by journalists, policymakers, practitioners, and citizens. Through strengthening institutions and exploring digital frontiers, we also work to expand scholarly access to knowledge, particularly in arenas where access has traditionally been limited. Tools Graduate and postgraduate fellowships Convening policymakers and scholars Cross-disciplinary engagement and innovation Conferences and workshops Mentorship for young scholars Books and other publications Digital forums and resources Lectures and public events Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 39.Contact Us | About

    Contact Us Online Form - SSRC Contact Form Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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