• 26.Executive Officers | About

    Executive Officers Working social scientists, the SSRC’s executive officers inspire and manage programming and operations with the counsel and oversight of the Board of Directors. Current Executive Officers ANNA HARVEY President RONALD KASSIMIR Vice President of Programs FRED PALM Vice President of Administration and Operations A History of Leadership 1923–27 Charles E. Merriam (chairman) 1927–29 Wesley C. Mitchell (chairman) 1927–31 Robert S. Lynd (permanent secretary) 1929–31 Edwin B. Wilson (president) 1931–32 Robert S. Woodworth (president) 1931–45 Robert T. Crane (permanent secretary, 1931–32; executive director, 1932–45) 1945–48 Donald Young (executive director, 1945–47; president, 1948) 1948–68 Pendleton Herring (president) 1948–70 Paul Webbink (vice president) 1966–71 Henry W. Riecken (vice president, 1966–68; president, 1969–71) 1971–72 Ralph W. Tyler (acting president) 1972–79 Eleanor Bernert Sheldon (president) 1973–89 David L. Sills (executive associate) 1974–78 David Jenness (executive associate) 1979–85 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1985–86 Francis X. Sutton (interim president) 1986–89 Frederic E. Wakeman Jr. (president) 1988–89 David L. Szanton (executive associate) 1988–89 Richard C. Rockwell (executive associate) 1989–95 David L. Featherman (president) 1990–95 Stanley J. Heginbotham (vice president) 1995–98 Kenneth Prewitt (president) 1997–2019 Mary Byrne McDonnell (executive program director, 1997–99; executive director, 1999–2018; senior vice president for strategic learning and special initiatives, 2018-2019) 1998–99 Orville (Bert) Brim Jr. (interim president) 1999–2012 Craig Calhoun (president) 2012–2017 Ira Katznelson (president) 2015–present Ronald Kassimir (executive program director, 2015-2018; vice president of programs, 2018-present) 2017–2021 Alondra Nelson (president) 2019–present Fred Palm (vice president of administration and operations) 2021-Present Anna Harvey (president) Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 27.Who We Are | About

    Who We Are Better understanding makes for better choices. The SSRC is an international, interdisciplinary network of networks dedicated to galvanizing knowledge and mobilizing it for the public good. The Council is unique in scope and structure. It convenes scholars, practitioners, and policymakers while standing alongside the academy and public affairs. By supporting individual scholars, enhancing the capacity of institutions, generating new research, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens, the SSRC plays a vital role in efforts to build a more just and democratic world. The SSRC was founded in 1923 by visionaries in the fledgling fields of anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, sociology, and statistics. The organization was shaped by the need to cross the boundaries that separated these disciplines from each other, university scholarship from public affairs, and the social sciences from the humanities and the natural sciences. For more than ninety years, the SSRC has navigated these borders, emerging as both a pivotal force in the academy and a respected contributor to the public good. Today, our work remains focused on enhancing the capacity of scholars and institutions and on building research networks that cross regions and disciplines to produce and communicate new knowledge. Commitment to Equity and Inclusion At the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), diversity, equity, and inclusion are core values, and also an opportunity to explore a wide array of perspectives and social phenomena, toward the goal of enriching and advancing our understanding of the human condition. The diversity of the SSRC staff, Board, and networks—including background, culture, experience, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, age, ability, and much more—strengthens the organization and our work. As an organization widely recognized for intellectual agenda-setting, the SSRC is committed to diversity, equity, and inclusion in all facets of our organization and work, including scholarly programs and initiatives; these efforts are emblematic of the organization’s broader and fundamental commitment to inclusiveness. View the SSRC Informational Brochure. [PDF] Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 28.Mellon Mays Program Tackles Concerns of Black South African Scholars

    Mellon Mays Program Tackles Concerns of Black South African Scholars The SSRC’s Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program (MMGIP) supports Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF) fellows through their graduate school years and the professoriate. Its programming is a series of events that target critical junctures in this process. The annual Graduate Student Summer Conference, held on the campus of a Mellon member school, is an introduction to MMGIP, as well as to what fellows may encounter in their first through third years of graduate school. It is modeled, in part, upon a professional association conference. Prominent keynote speakers are invited, and fellows submit abstracts and, if selected, present their work in a paper session forum with feedback from our Mellon PhDs. As most fellows are in American graduate schools, that has been the focus. The MMGIP has over 750 PhD recipients and over 700 graduate students in PhD programs. The University of Cape Town (UCT) became a part of MMUF in 2001 and was joined by the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) and the University of the Western Cape (UWC) in 2008 and 2009, respectively. There are now over 20 South African Mellon PhDs and more than 180 graduate students in pursuit of advanced degrees. This population of fellows has reached a critical mass, with concerns about the academy that are universal, but also issues that are unique to South Africa. To give voice to their concerns and best serve this population of fellows, the program created a pilot Summer Conference for South African fellows to be held during the summer months in Cape Town. Over 40 South African Mellon fellows joined us January 29–31 for this event. While the conference followed the model of the Summer Conference traditionally held in the US, it was uniquely South African. The theme of the conference came from the fellows themselves, entitled “On Being a Black Academic in South Africa.” The conference began with the Benjamin E Mays Address, which is an opportunity for one of our more veteran fellows with a PhD to talk about their career, research, and Mellon experience. Dr. Nkosiyasi Dube, who entered MMUF in 2008 and is currently a lecturer in the Department of Social Work at the University of Witwatersrand, delivered an address that was deeply engaging to the fellows attending. He encouraged fellows to be confident in their work and in themselves as academics, remarking, “If you don’t say it, then no one will know it … whatever you do, don’t be comfortable in your corner—be confident and share [your work] …” He concluded his speech by commenting on the crucial role that Mellon’s support played in his current success. Quoting an African proverb, he said, “The axe that cuts a tree forgets, but the cut tree never [does].” The vice chancellors from Wits and UCT, as well as other professors and administrators from our South African institutions, joined the fellows at dinner for lively conversation and the building of new networks. While the South African Summer Conference followed the model of the US Summer Conference in that fellows were able to present their work on paper panels and get feedback, enjoy workshops on a variety of skills ranging from studying overseas to how to write abstracts and CVs, every participant was South African and affiliated with the Mellon program. This was a powerful example not only of the growth of MMUF in South Africa, but also of the growing production of knowledge from the global South. The keynote panel, “On Being a Black Scholar in South Africa,” included Dr. Abongwe Bangeni, co-ordinator of the Language Development Group at UCT’s Centre for Higher Education Development; Edwina Brooks, director of student development at UCT; and Dr. Sakhumzi Mfecane, department head of anthropology and sociology at UWC. The panelists spoke about issues that fellows wanted addressed. These included the decolonization of the academy; mindfulness of the space one occupies as a black scholar; finding one’s own voice and agency in these spaces; and suppor…

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  • 29.New Leadership at Measure of America

    New Leadership at Measure of America Measure of America (MOA) has announced that Kristen Lewis, who has been co-director of the program with Sarah Burd-Sharps since they founded MOA in 2007, will lead the program as director. Since its founding, Measure of America has consistently produced provocative, data-driven reports on well-being and access to opportunity in the United States, user-friendly online data tools, and in-depth explorations of a range of crucial public issues, such as the spike in the rate of youth disconnection and the broad community benefits of increased investments in education. The breadth of MOA’s work has proven essential to elected officials and agencies at all levels of government, social service organizations, civic advocacy groups, philanthropic organizations, and the public at large, informing policymakers, legislators, and everyday people. “Sarah Burd-Sharps and Kristen Lewis forged a singularly effective collaboration that has proven immensely beneficial for communities across the United States,” said SSRC president Alondra Nelson. “I applaud Sarah for recognizing the power of the international human development approach for understanding challenges here in the US and thank her for her extraordinary contributions to the program’s success.” Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 30.Where We Work | About

    Where We Work With headquarters in Brooklyn, New York, the SSRC partners with scholars, academic institutions, NGOs, and governmental bodies across the world. Council activities and networks span more than 80 countries on 6 continents. Learn more about SSRC Programs. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 31.General Terms of Use

    General Terms of Use The information presented and opinions expressed in comments and entries by individuals do not necessarily represent the views of the Social Science Research Council. Content published on the SSRC's public web site is free to be republished and/or redistributed, providing that the use is non-commercial and that the author and the SSRC are properly attributed. We prefer to have those interested in redistributing our web content online do so by publishing an excerpt and link to the full content on the SSRC web site, where it will be freely available, or at least that they include a link to the original content on the SSRC site. SSRC Forums Content For content published in our forums, we strongly recommend contacting the forum's editor/administrator to ensure that there are no other legal restrictions on the use of the material in question. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 32.Fellowships

    Promoting innovative research worldwide Since 1923, the SSRC has awarded more than fifteen thousand fellowships to researchers around the globe. Council fellowship programs are strategic—they target specific problems, promote individual and institutional change, and expand networks. The SSRC’s varied fellowships and prizes share a core commitment to improving conditions for social science knowledge production worldwide. Programs engage themes ranging from global issues facing the United States and Japan to security in Africa and Latin America. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 33.Print & Digital

    Sharing New Knowledge The SSRC has published in the social sciences since 1929 and continues to shape the direction of scholarship and public policy through a wide range of books, reports, working papers, policy briefs, and articles. SSRC digital projects extend our tradition of engagement through rigorous inquiry, offering informed perspectives on topics of pressing concern and essential resources for researchers and practitioners. Digital projects include forums, essay collections, resource hubs, and exhibitions of our programmatic work. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 34.Get Involved

    SUPPORT THE SSRC Council programs support researchers, build worldwide capacity for knowledge production, and nurture innovation and excellence. For more than ninety years, these activities have been made possible by the generosity of our foundation, institutional, governmental, and individual partners. The need for rich and effective social science is urgent and persistent. As a proven incubator for new forms of inquiry, and as a connector and communicator of research and expertise, the SSRC plays a vital role in the work of building a more just society. Our donors are key partners in that work. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 35.Financials | About

    Financials 2019 Audited Financial Statements 2018 Audited Financial Statements 2017 Audited Financial Statements Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 36.Mission | About

    The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent, international, nonprofit organization founded in 1923. It fosters innovative research, nurtures new generations of social scientists, deepens how inquiry is practiced within and across disciplines, and mobilizes necessary knowledge on important public issues. The SSRC is guided by the belief that justice, prosperity, and democracy all require better understanding of complex social, cultural, economic, and political processes. We work with practitioners, policymakers, and academic researchers in the social sciences, related professions, and the humanities and natural sciences. We build interdisciplinary and international networks, working with partners around the world to link research to practice and policy, strengthen individual and institutional capacities for learning, and enhance public access to information. Basic Commitments The SSRC approaches its work guided by five basic commitments: Fostering innovation. We work on problems that need new approaches; we act as a catalyst for new thinking. We seek to mobilize the most creative and knowledgeable researchers and to help research institutions be more dynamic. Renewing existing expertise, putting knowledge to work on new problems, and generating novel data and theories are all crucial to advancing social science for the public good. Investing in the future. We ensure the future of knowledge production through nurturing new generations of researchers, enabling practitioners to act on scientific knowledge, enhancing cross-fertilization among intellectual fields, developing capacity where it is most lacking, and facilitating the internationalization of social science. Working internationally and democratically. Better understanding of basic social processes is a resource for improving the lives of all. It should be available to all. Participation in the production of scientific knowledge should also be as broad as possible. We support the internationalization of social science and opportunities for under-represented groups both as matters of equity and as requirements for ensuring that the production of knowledge is informed by different contexts and perspectives. Combining urgency and patience. We bring researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and broader publics together to focus on topics of pressing public importance from health to human rights. But since even the most urgent problems are seldom solved overnight, we must learn even as we act, and we must continually renew existing knowledge. Keeping standards high. Practical action, policy, and debate on major public issues all need to be informed by the best possible knowledge. This is produced by emphasizing scientific quality, engaging important public questions, and ensuring openness to critical analysis. Theory and research can then command the attention of those who approach practical issues with different values or agendas. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 37.First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science

    First University Fund Convening Focuses on Challenges to Social Science The SSRC hosted thirty-five senior academic and administrative leaders from member institutions of its University Fund for the Social Sciences at a conference exploring challenges and opportunities for producing, sharing, and using insights from the social sciences. The University Fund is composed of institutions of higher education that support the work of the SSRC and share the vision that research is essential to advancing the public missions of scholars and scholarship. The October 16 convening was hosted by the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and was organized by a planning committee that included Peter Lange, of Duke University and the SSRC’s Board of Directors; Deborah Prentice, provost of Princeton University; Chase Robinson, president of the CUNY Graduate Center; and Alberta Sbragia, vice provost at the University of Pittsburgh. The program focused on the concerns of the SSRC’s To Secure Knowledge task force, created to recommend ways to protect and advance social science’s ability to contribute to scientific innovation and public problem-solving. The University Fund representatives examined the nature of higher education in our current moment, including doubts about claims to scientific expertise; the optimal institutional arrangements for the production of research and social policy; and the accessibility and integrity of scholarly, federal, and proprietary data systems for social research as well as the opportunities these systems present for scientific advancement and social impact. Suggestions emerging from the University Fund conference will contribute to the task force’s report, to be released in early 2018. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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  • 38.Directions to the SSRC

    Directions to the SSRC View Larger Map The Social Science Research Council is located at One Pierrepont Plaza in Brooklyn, on the 15th floor. Our street address, according to Google Maps, is 300 Cadman Plaza West, just north of Pierrepont Street. We are near several subway stops. Detailed directions are available for trains arriving from Manhattan: 2, 3: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 2, 3) 4, 5: Borough Hall (detailed directions from the 4, 5) A, C: High St/Brooklyn Bridge (detailed directions from the A, C) F: Jay St/Borough Hall (detailed directions from the F) R: Court St (detailed directions from the R) Upon entering the building, please show your ID to the front desk attendant, who will grant you access to the elevators. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. If you need any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact the front desk at 212-377-2700. Thank you! Our mailing address is: Social Science Research Council One Pierrepont Plaza, 15th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA P: 212-377-2700 | F: 212-377-2727 | E: info@ssrc.org Detailed Directions from Manhattan 2, 3 to Borough Hall: Use the stairs or escalator toward the rear of the train for the “Court Street and Montague Street” exit. Proceed through the turnstile then exit the station using the staircase on your right to Montague Street. Cross Montague Street toward TD Bank. Look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. To get there, keep walking North (straight) along Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Our main entrance has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. 4, 5 to Borough Hall: Use the staircase toward the middle of the platfrom for the “Borough Hall/Joralemon Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, follow signs toward Borough Hall. Proceed through turnstile then take the stairs furthest to your left. You will exit in front of Duane Reade. Walk north on Court Street (away from starbucks) past Remsen and Montague Streets. At Montague Street, Court Street becomes Cadman Plaza West. Continue north on Cadman Plaza West and cross Pierrepont Street. Ours is the first building after Pierrepont Street, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. A, C to High St/Brooklyn Bridge: Use the stairs near the rear of the train for the “Cadman Plaza West, Cranberry Street, Henry Street” exit. At the top of the stairs, proceed to the bank of escalators and up. There is only one exit—when you emerge onto the sidewalk, you’ll be facing south on Cadman Plaza West. Continue straight ahead on Cadman, crossing Clark and Clinton streets. If you look up and you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the building, please check in with the front desk to exchange your ID for a temporary access key to the turnstiles. Proceed to the rear elevator bank and take the elevator to the 15th floor. F to Jay St/Borough Hall: Use the stairs toward the front of the train for the “Willoughby Street and Jay Street” exit. Walk north on Jay Street (past Metrotech Walk and Mrtyle Avenue) to Johnson Street, which will be the first possible left. Turn left onto Johnson and continue west toward Cadman Plaza West. If you look up, you will see our building, a tall red-brick building with a green pointed roof. Our main entrance is on Cadman Plaza West and has ONE PIERREPONT PLAZA written above the doors. Upon entering the buildin…

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  • 39.Creative Commons

    Creative Commons Except where otherwise noted, content published on or after January 1, 2014, on the SSRC’s public website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. This license permits you to copy, distribute, and display such content as long as you mention and link back to the SSRC, attribute the work appropriately (including both author and title), and do not adapt the content or use it commercially. For all undated content and all content published on the SSRC’s website prior to January 1, 2014, please contact the Council’s Communications Department to ensure that there are no legal restrictions on the use of the material in question. The information presented and opinions expressed in individual posts and comments on the SSRC’s website do not necessarily represent the views of the Social Science Research Council. Mobilizing social science for the public good. The Social Science Research Council, an independent, international nonprofit, mobilizes necessary knowledge for the public good by supporting scholars worldwide, generating new research across disciplines, and linking researchers with policymakers and citizens. By subscribing, you agree that the SSRC may process your information in accordance with our privacy policy.

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