• 1.AIDS, Security and Conflict Research Hub

    The AIDS, Security and Conflict Research Hub is a portal for the latest work on the areas covered by the SSRC's AIDS, Security and Conflict Initiative (ASCI): HIV/AIDS in uniformed services; HIV/AIDS, humanitarian crises, and post-conflict transitions; HIV/AIDS and fragile states; and gender and cross-cutting issues. The site is home to the Resource Database, a community-editable "field mapping" tool for collecting data on people, institutions, and resources in the fields of HIV/AIDS, security, and conflict. Go to the hub front page.

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  • 2.Abe Fellows Global Forum

    An initiative of the Abe Fellowship Program, the Abe Fellows Global Forum (Abe Global) is designed to bring Abe Fellow research and expertise on pressing issues of global concern to broader audiences. Abe Global will host several events each year in partnership with academic and civic organizations throughout the United States. Upcoming Events Abe Global Washington, DC | Cyber Challenges: The Internet, Global Competition, and National Security will be held September 5, 2019 at the Hudson Institutes Stern Policy Center. 2018 Events Two events were held in 2018 on the theme of Japanese and American innovation in a global age. The first event was on December 1, 2018 in cooperation with and at the Georgia Institute of Technology; the second was on December 3, 2018 in Washington, DC, in cooperation with and at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. A livestream of the event in Washington, DC is available here. 2017 Events Three events were held in 2017. The first two focused on the theme of “Confronting Climate Change: What Can Japan and the US Contribute to Creating Sustainable Societies,” and were held on October 18, 2017 in cooperation with and at the Asia Society Texas Center in Houston and October 20, 2017 in cooperation with the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University. The third event, entitled “Japan and the Leadership of the World Trading System” was held on November 10, 2017 in cooperation with Columbia University's Center on Japanese Economy and Business and School of International Public Affairs.   For more information on these events, click on the event links below. The Abe Fellowship Program is a partnership between the Social Science Research Council and the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership.

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  • 3.African Peacebuilding Network

    Supporting independent African research on peacebuilding and its integration into regional and global policy.

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  • 4.Anxieties of Democracy

    Can representative democracies be strengthened to govern more effectively?.

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  • 5.Anxieties of Democracy Cambridge University Press Book Series

    The Anxieties of Democracy program is collaborating with Cambridge University Press to publish a series of edited volumes. The Anxieties of Democracy series features work from scholars involved in the program’s working groups and partnerships, and covers topics ranging from the performance of American governing institutions to the politics of economic insecurity. At a fraught moment for democracies worldwide, the Anxieties of Democracy series brings together renowned scholars to probe the sources of current apprehensions about democracy and to explore how democratic regimes might thrive. The first volume in the series, “Can America Govern Itself?” was published May 2019, and will be available for print in June 2019. Several other volumes are out for review. The series is edited by John A. Ferejohn, Ira Katznelson, and Deborah J. Yashar. To follow us on Twitter, please click here: @SSRCanxieties.  Published Volumes “Can America Govern Itself?” (ed. Lee & McCarty, 2019) “Can America Govern Itself?” brings together a diverse group of distinguished scholars to analyze how rising party polarization and economic inequality have affected the performance of American governing institutions. It is organized around two themes: the changing nature of representation in the United States; and how changes in the political environment have affected the internal processes of institutions, overall government performance, and policy outcomes. The chapters in this volume analyze concerns about power, influence and representation in American politics, the quality of deliberation and political communications, the management and implementation of public policy, and the performance of an eighteenth century constitution in today's polarized political environment. These renowned scholars provide a deeper and more systematic grasp of what is new, and what is perennial in challenges to democracy at a fraught moment. “Can America Govern Itself?” was produced as a result of meetings, conversations, and efforts from the Anxieties of Democracy working group on Institutions. The volume can be found online here, and will made available in print in June 2019. Editors: Frances E. Lee Professor of Government and Politics, University of Maryland Nolan McCarty Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Princeton University Other Contributors: Kenneth Benoit (London School of Economics), Brandice Canes-Wrone (Princeton University), Anthony Chen(Northwestern University), James Curry (The University of Utah), Lee Drutman (New America Foundation), Nathan Gibson (Princeton University), Daniel Gillion (University of Pennsylvania), Matthew Grossman (Michigan State University), Peter Hanson (University of Denver), Timothy LaPira (James Madison University), Claire Leavitt (Cornell University), Suzanne Mettler (Cornell University), Kevin Munger (New York University), Gillian Metzger (Columbia University), Sam Rosenfeld (Colgate University), Daniel Schlozman (Johns Hopkins University), David Spence (University of Texas at Austin), and Arthur Spirling (New York University). .

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  • 6.Atlantic Fellows

    The Council has been named a strategic learning and evaluation partner for the Atlantic Fellows, a network of fellowship programs funded by the Atlantic Philanthropies aimed at empowering a new generation of leaders and change-makers to advance fairer, healthier, more inclusive, and more equitable societies around the world. Fellows collaborate across disciplines and borders to understand and address the root causes of pressing global problems. The Atlantic Philanthropies understands that a system of strategic learning and assessment designed to guide and support the institutions selected to host its fellowships is essential to ensuring its investments contribute to a learning legacy and make substantial and sustainable impacts. The SSRC is serving as the primary learning and assessment partner for four of the seven fellowships the Atlantic Philanthropies is supporting, providing each fellowship with developmental support, ongoing formative evaluations aimed at improving the structure and organization of the fellowship host institutions, and a long-term strategic learning and assessment plan. Atlantic Fellows for Equity in Brain Health The Atlantic Fellows for Equity in Brain Health seek social and public health solutions to reduce the scale and adverse impact of dementia. Fellows have residential appointments at either the University of California, San Francisco, or Trinity College Dublin. Atlantic Fellows for Health Equity in Southeast Asia The Atlantic Fellows for Health Equity in Southeast Asia seek to promote and improve health equity throughout the region, particularly among the most vulnerable and marginalized populations. Annual cohorts of fellows participate in a nonresidential program that includes attendance at events throughout Southeast Asia and an event at Harvard University. Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity The Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity aspire to build an enduring network of leaders dedicated to working across issues, approaches, and geographies to create institutions, narratives, and policies that will advance racial equity and justice. Annual cohorts of fellows participate in a nonresidential program that includes six week-long sessions in New York, Johannesburg, and other US and South African cities. Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity seek to address the major global challenge of entrenched and growing inequality. The fellowship is based at the International Inequalities Institute of the London School of Economics.

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  • 7.Atlantic Fellows for Health Equity in Southeast Asia

    The Atlantic Fellows for Health Equity in Southeast Asia seek to promote and improve health equity throughout the region, particularly among the most vulnerable and marginalized populations. Fellows from 10 ASEAN countries and China will work to reform health policy and systems, tackle social determinants, and address health inequities within and beyond national boundaries. Annual cohorts of 20 to 25 fellows will participate in a nonresidential program that includes attendance at events throughout Southeast Asia and an event at Harvard University. The program is intended to identify and nurture a new generation of young leaders from the region who are committed to pursuing social justice in health and building a collaborative community. The fellowship curriculum, which will be taught by core faculty and mentors, will combine peer, experiential, and online-blended learning. Upon completion of the program, fellows will be better able to enhance health equity by improving access to quality primary health care; formulating equity-oriented policies in health care systems; addressing issues involving economics, gender, and the environment; and establishing international alliances.

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  • 8.Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity

    The Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity seek to dismantle anti-black racism in the United States and South Africa through supporting visionary leaders who can challenge and advance ambitious and comprehensive solutions to racial inequality. The program will support the growth and development of a generation of leaders to advance racial equity through advocacy, research, communications and other interventions that change narratives, structures, systems, policies and practices. Annual cohorts of 25 fellows will participate in an 18-month nonresidential program that includes six week-long sessions in New York, Johannesburg, and other US and South African cities. Through the program, fellows will develop a deeper understanding of the history and conditions contributing to racial inequality. They will become more knowledgeable of cross-sector strategies for change and more skilled in leading transformative change. As a result, they will be better equipped to lead and implement interventions that ameliorate disparities and address the underlying causes of racial inequality.

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  • 9.Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity

    The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity program will identify and prepare a pipeline and network of diverse, multidisciplinary, action- and results-oriented leaders working toward integrated, comprehensive solutions to historical and structural impediments and systems that underpin international inequalities. The fellowship, based at the International Inequalities Institute of the London School of Economics, is available in three fully funded tracks (10 residential fellows, 10 nonresidential fellows, and 10 visiting fellows) tailored to meet the time or financial needs of experienced professionals. All fellows will receive a combination of academic opportunities, dedicated mentors, attendance at conferences and workshops, and a lifelong alumni network.

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  • 10.Big Data and Historical Social Science

    While “big data” often connotes new opportunities for understanding the present, largely through the analysis of social media and search engine data, other newly available kinds of rich data sources create huge possibilities for reimagining the past. In recent years, millions of previously difficult-to-access documents and massive archival data structures have become widely available to scholars of human history and the general public.  The project on Big Data and Historical Social Science brings together researchers across a range of disciplines, methods, and research strategies to explore the intersection of classical historical and social science problems with big data. How can access to new kinds of historical data, and new capacities to manipulate and analyze them, allow scholars to address historical questions in new ways?  The first demonstration project of this group is entitled “Reclaiming Lost Data on American Racial Inequality: 1865-1940.” Participants in this project include economists, historians, political scientists, and sociologists from across the country. After several planning meetings, the scholars working on this project were awarded a grant through the Russell Sage Foundation initiative on Computational Social Science to create accessible, linked datasets that will help social scientists of all disciplines gain access to more accurate information about African American populations in United States history.  Current participants   Marcella Alsan (Stanford University), Audrey Augenbraum (Columbia University) Peter Bearman (Columbia University), Leah Boustan (Princeton University), Karida Brown (University of North Carolina), James Feigenbaum (Boston University), Megan Ming Francis (University of Washington), Trevon Logan (The Ohio State University) Mara Loveman (University of California, Berkeley), Christopher Muller (University of California, Berkeley), Suresh Naidu (Columbia University), Evan Roberts (University of Minnesota), Eric Schickler (University of California, Berkeley), Benjamin Schmidt (Northeastern University), and Vesla Weaver (Johns Hopkins University).

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  • 11.CEHI Web-Based Resources

    …[中文] The Resource Hub is an online, bilingual searchable database housing information about individuals and institutions working on environment and health issues in China, and relevant literature. Selected information on experience with environment and health issues overseas is also included. All information items are linked so that readers can easily trace information. Created in 2007, the Hub now includes over 3,500 items in English and Chinese. It provides a convenient way for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners in the field to access the relevant literature and identify partners for collaboration.   The FORHEAD website includes not only information about network events but also special features introducing new research on particular environment and health issues from across the disciplines, relevant conceptual and methodological tools, and international experience. These materials offer a flexible resource for educational institutions, government agencies and NGOs, who can download packages of information tailored to their needs for trainings, outreach, or other activities. .

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  • 12.CPPF Activities: Africa

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  • 13.CPPF Activities: Asia and the Pacific

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  • 14.CPPF Activities: Europe/Caucasus/Middle East

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  • 15.CPPF Activities: Latin America and the Caribbean

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  • 16.CPPF Activities: Special Projects

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  • 17.CPPF Activities: Thematic

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  • 18.Capacity Strengthening for Field Research in Insecure Places

    The UVC will strengthen conflict research in insecure places and the ways that conflict is researched, while building local research capacity in these places through two distinct methods: Investing in building and strengthening inter-disciplinary, local research networks in conflict-affected countries, and developing an approach that engages local researchers in all stages of research, i.e., from research design, data collection, analysis of data, writing up, to publication and dissemination of results. By involving local researchers in all stages of our research agenda, we create shared ownership, increase researchers’ trust in their own capacities, and establish international partnerships that provide mutual benefits while we produce high-quality, evidence-based scholarship. Developing training modules on fieldwork and ethics methods in insecure places. Some of our partners have also pioneered remote research methods in making use of civil society, activities, media, and research networks; while others conduct data-driven analyses on conflicts and peace processes, building on recent advances in geographic information system (GIS) and other digital technology. The UVC aims to collate these experiences and innovations in conflict research methods, develop training modules, and provide methods trainings across its research networks and partners.

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  • 19.Central Africa Policy Forum (CAPF)

    Facilitating informal information sharing between the UN, diplomatic missions, and the NGO community.

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  • 20.Centre for Public Authority and International Development (CPAID)

    The UVC has partnered with a new LSE research center, The Centre for Public Authority and International Development (CPAID), on a study focusing on how societies are governed in African countries facing prolonged conflict. CPAID will take a look at how public authority is understood, experienced, and perceived by the particularly vulnerable and marginalized populations in countries such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Central African Republic, South Sudan, Somalia and Burundi and Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Uganda and Ethiopia, CPAID. Through a focus on how families, clans, religious leaders, aid agencies, civil society, rebel militia and vigilante groups contribute to governance, along with formal and semi-formal government institutions. Through funding from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Global Research Challenges Fund, CPAID will speak to the on the ground realities and the risks and opportunities for international development policy and the promotion of new forms of inclusive growth. UVC Director Tatiana Carayannis is one of the co-investigators of CPAID. The UVC will produce a number of research outputs for CPAID and help enhance its impact strategy through the UVC's longstanding relationships with the United Nations and other international policymakers. For more information please see the CPAID website. .

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  • 21.Children of Immigrants in Schools

    The Education and Migration project is coordinating a three-year research and fellowship initiative investigating the role of educational institutions and policy in the integration of children of immigrants. Under the leadership of sociologist Richard Alba of SUNY-Albany, we have assembled five bi-national (American and European) teams, staffed with senior principal investigators and research fellows (pre- and postdocs) from both the United States and the European country under comparison: School funding and tracking in New York City, USA, and Amsterdam, Holland. Navigating borders in schools and communities in California and Catalonia, Spain. The impact of timing, differentiation, and second chances in the United States and Great Britain. Promising schooling practices for immigrant children in the United States and Sweden. The transition to the labor market for Mexicans in the United States and North Africans in France.   More detailed information can be found on the project's website or by downloading the flyer on the right.

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  • 22.China, Africa, and the UN

    Mapping the evolving relationships between China, Africa, and the United Nations.

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  • 23.Civil Society - UN Prevention Platform

    The Civil Society – UN Prevention Platform was created in 2016 against the backdrop of a renewed focus at the UN on prevention and inclusivity, not least the three reviews of UN’s peacebuilding architecture, peace operations and work on women, peace and security of 2015 and the 2016 resolutions (UNSCR 2282). The Platform is co-facilitated by the Quaker United Nations Office (QUNO) and the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) in close collaboration with UN Department of Political Affairs (DPA). It also consists of a core, coordinating group of eight partners in New York, Europe and Africa, who act as a sounding board for the Platform’s work. The UVC program is one of these key partners. To contribute to meaningful inclusion of and partnerships with local actors, the Civil Society – UN Prevention Platform aims to improve the cooperation and coordination on prevention between UN actors across the system and civil society actors in New York and in the field. In cooperation with DPA and other UN agencies and departments, the Platform arranges thematic and country-specific meetings bringing together UN and civil society actors to: Exchange examples of best practices and lessons learned, Identify concrete areas and forms of collaboration between and amongst CSOs and the UN and ways to strengthen UN-CSO cooperation at a practical level, Discuss ways of bridging the gap between early warning and early action, Engage with Member States to build support for the prevention agenda. Rather than focusing on the issues and challenges related to prevention, the discussions focus on creative ways of increasing the UN’s capacities to resolve these challenges. Most importantly, the Platform relies and draws on a still-growing network of global experts of CSOs who each bring their trusted, local networks and partners. We are therefore able to connect UN actors to civil society actors on the ground in a wide range of countries and also provide concrete examples of best practices.

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  • 24.Climate Change in the Indian Ocean Region

    This project aims to nurture an international network of scholars exploring the geopolitical effects of climate change in the Indian Ocean region, a key site for examining the immediate and long-term responses to phenomena such as sea-level rise, increased flooding, and more frequent drought. The first meeting of these collaborators, selected through an open call targeting Indian Ocean-based researchers, was held in September 2018, in conjunction with the International Institute for Asian Studies conference entitled “Africa-Asia: A New Nexus for Knowledge.” Scholarly Borderlands sponsored the participation of scholars from North America, Africa, and Asia to attend the full conference and participate in closed sessions to chart existing research on climate change adaptation and mitigation, identify gaps in research agendas across the Indian Ocean trans-region, and propose activities that could build research communities and strengthen their capacities. The Indian Ocean is an ideal space to refine and develop new, collaborative methodological and analytic approaches to understanding environmental change, while being wary of the Global-North-centric discourse of “climate change.” We hope to continue to engage experts in the region in ways that will build a network of international scholars who can work together to establish norms and ethical standards for international partnerships, focusing on questions of climate and urban development in the Indian Ocean trans-region.

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  • 25.College and University Fund for the Social Sciences

    To mark its ninetieth anniversary in 2013, the Social Science Research Council established the College and University Fund for the Social Sciences, a consortium of higher education partners providing annual financial support to enhance the infrastructure of social science research, catalyze interdisciplinary and cross-institutional collaborations, and help launch the careers of junior scholars through fellowships, workshops, and mentorship. “In partnership with this select group of leading colleges and universities, all deeply committed to the advancement of the social sciences, the Council works to enhance research and scholarship. An intellectual incubator, the SSRC serves as a platform for pioneering research, for new networks of cross-disciplinary and cross-sector collaboration, and for the production of social knowledge about important issues of public concern.” — Alondra Nelson, SSRC President The College and University Fund offers many opportunities for learning and engagement to member faculty and students: Conferences. The College and University Fund Conferences, held every eighteen to twenty-four months, bring together senior administrators from member institutions to think strategically about the future of the social science research and teaching. The inaugural CUF Conference was held in October 2017. The next conference will be held in New York City on September 23, 2019. Invitation-only seminars and events. Member institutions receive exclusive invitations for their faculty and students to take part in private seminars and public events with prominent scholars involved in the Council’s programs.

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