• 26.China, Africa, and the UN

    Mapping the evolving relationships between China, Africa, and the United Nations.

    Programs & Projects
  • 27.Civil Society - UN Prevention Platform

    The Civil Society – UN Prevention Platform was created in 2016 against the backdrop of a renewed focus at the UN on prevention and inclusivity, not least the three reviews of UN’s peacebuilding architecture, peace operations and work on women, peace and security of 2015 and the 2016 resolutions (UNSCR 2282). The Platform is co-facilitated by the Quaker United Nations Office (QUNO) and the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) in close collaboration with UN Department of Political Affairs (DPA). It also consists of a core, coordinating group of eight partners in New York, Europe and Africa, who act as a sounding board for the Platform’s work. The UVC program is one of these key partners. To contribute to meaningful inclusion of and partnerships with local actors, the Civil Society – UN Prevention Platform aims to improve the cooperation and coordination on prevention between UN actors across the system and civil society actors in New York and in the field. In cooperation with DPA and other UN agencies and departments, the Platform arranges thematic and country-specific meetings bringing together UN and civil society actors to: Exchange examples of best practices and lessons learned, Identify concrete areas and forms of collaboration between and amongst CSOs and the UN and ways to strengthen UN-CSO cooperation at a practical level, Discuss ways of bridging the gap between early warning and early action, Engage with Member States to build support for the prevention agenda. Rather than focusing on the issues and challenges related to prevention, the discussions focus on creative ways of increasing the UN’s capacities to resolve these challenges. Most importantly, the Platform relies and draws on a still-growing network of global experts of CSOs who each bring their trusted, local networks and partners. We are therefore able to connect UN actors to civil society actors on the ground in a wide range of countries and also provide concrete examples of best practices.

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  • 28.College and University Fund for the Social Sciences

    To mark its ninetieth anniversary in 2013, the Social Science Research Council established the College and University Fund for the Social Sciences, a consortium of higher education partners providing annual financial support to enhance the infrastructure of social science research, catalyze interdisciplinary and cross-institutional collaborations, and help launch the careers of junior scholars through fellowships, workshops, and mentorship. “In partnership with this select group of leading colleges and universities, all deeply committed to the advancement of the social sciences, the Council works to enhance research and scholarship. An intellectual incubator, the SSRC serves as a platform for pioneering research, for new networks of cross-disciplinary and cross-sector collaboration, and for the production of social knowledge about important issues of public concern.” — Alondra Nelson, SSRC President The College and University Fund offers many opportunities for learning and engagement to member faculty and students: Conferences. The College and University Fund Conferences, held every eighteen to twenty-four months, bring together senior administrators from member institutions to think strategically about the future of the social science research and teaching. Link to Inaugural CUF Conference Invitation-only seminars and events. Member institutions receive exclusive invitations for their faculty and students to take part in private seminars and public events with prominent scholars involved in the Council’s programs. Shared learning. Member faculty are invited to SSRC’s headquarters to meet with program staff about shared concerns and opportunities for engagement. Member institutions also receive all of the SSRC’s publications and special reports highlighting the work of the SSRC on their campuses.

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  • 29.Conflict Prevention and Peace Forum (CPPF)

    Mobilizing necessary knowledge to support UN capacity for conflict prevention, peacemaking and peacebuilding.

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  • 30.Conflict Research

    The UVC will produce and disseminate new research (books, journal articles, working papers) and analyze the evolution of complex and persistent violent conflicts in Africa and the Middle East through seminars and workshops on the following themes: Theme 1: Evolution of Multidimensional Conflict and Interventions to End Them The dynamics of a turbulent and globally integrated political marketplace driving violence, creating war economies, and making populations mutable and vulnerable to moral populist agendas and extremism; The role of humanitarian aid and military assistance in illicit economies; How people attempt to construct public authority in such situations; How these dynamics help to explain the success or failure of development and governance interventions; This work is linked to grants the SSRC has received to participate in the Conflict Research Programme (CRP) and the Centre for Public Authority and International Development (CPAID). Theme 2: Forced Displacement and the Politics of Return Physical and symbolic processes of ‘return’ The impact of (3) common types of support aimed at facilitating return: resettlement and reintegration programs, cosmologies of belonging, and issues of justice. Despite seeing record numbers of displaced worldwide, we know little about how viable ways of life are constituted post-return. This is a critical missing link in transitional justice debates—an understanding of who returns where, and what happens to them and to their communities once they return. Making sense of the local dynamics in these processes of return is key in post-conflict settings because it has implications for reintegration and reconciliation, and for the prevention of conflict relapse, as they touch on issues of social cohesion, livelihoods, land tenure, and long term competition for power. This work is linked to grants the SSRC has received to participate in the Politics of Return (PoR) project. Theme 3: Emerging Conflict Actors and New Technologies While some argue war in the twenty-first century is on the decline, others point out that it merely has taken on new forms. Increasingly, conflict environments feature not only state armies but also non-state armed groups, criminal gangs, drug-traffickers, terrorists, and private contractors, where civilians may be both victim and perpetrator. These actors employ new communications and weapons technologies and frequently operate across national borders and regions, even when local allegiances are a critical dynamic of violence. The UVC is developing a stream of work on these emerging conflict actors and new technologies. A few initial sub-themes we are developing include:  Shifting global power dynamics and digital technologies as tools of international influence; The evolution and trajectories of UAV technology, including the drive to autonomous weapons systems, early warning systems and civilian protection tools, and the prospects for effective regulation; The impact of new technologies on conflict-affected populations.

    Programs & Projects
  • 31.Conflict Research Programme (CRP)

    The UVC has partnered with the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and a host of other partners on this UK Department for International Development (DFID) funded research consortium. The Conflict Research Programme (CRP) will fill a gap of understanding on the increasing complex dynamics characterizing contemporary armed conflicts and the ways in which high level political contests translate into violent contestation at local levels. With an initial focus on Iraq, Syria, DRC, Somalia, and South Sudan, the CRP measures to tackle the drivers and dynamics of armed conflict through research on the following central questions: (a) Political Marketplace: How does the political marketplace function and interact with systems of governance and moral populism to drive violence? (b) ‘What works’: How do structural interventions and ‘bottom-up’ local efforts to maintain values of civicness such as justice, civility, inclusion, and dialogue challenge and resist systems of power and exclusionary identity politics and complement ‘top-down’ interventions to create an institutionalized public authority that commands legitimacy? (c) Post-conflict state-building rarely works, and it is not for lack of effort; contemporary violent conflicts have a number of key characteristics that frustrate and subvert international engagement: How can interventions enhance local and international efforts at reducing violence, minimizing human suffering, and improving governance? UVC Director Tatiana Carayannis will co-direct the consortium's work on the Democratic Republic of Congo with Ghent University's Koen Vlassenroot, and lead on the CRP's thematic focus on security sectors interventions with the World Peace Foundation's Mulugeta Gebrehiwot. The CRP is led by Consortium Executive Director, Professor Mary Kaldor and Co-Director for Research, Professor Alex de Waal.  Professor Toby Dodge leads the work on Iraq and the wider region, and Dr. Rim Turkmani is the research director for Syria. The UVC will also manage the Conflict Research Fellowship and the CRP Small Grants Programme. For more information, please see the CRP website.

    Programs & Projects
  • 32.Contextual Knowledge and Field Experimentation

    Field experiment methodologies, particularly in the disciplines of economics, political science, and psychology, have grown in relevance because they are viewed as powerful tools for social understanding and explanation, as well as for improving lives and livelihoods in policy contexts.  However, both the enthusiasm and the controversy surrounding field experiments have obscured what we consider to be a more substantial and perhaps more important matter: when and how does deep knowledge of the “field” enrich or challenge the results of field experiments? This study group is comprised of scholars across a range of fields, including economics, political science, psychology, and anthropology, who are actively engaged in field experimentation and/or are committed to research that generates deeper contextual understanding. The purpose of this project is to provide a platform through which to facilitate connections across disciplines that could make the inclusion of cultural and other context more accessible for field experimentation work. Ultimately, participants will leverage this collaborative dialogue to create a toolbox, set of teaching modules, or other training intervention that can be utilized by those wishing to enhance their methodological approach with contextual knowledge. Current Participants: Joshua Carpenter (University of Alabama), Ryan Enos (Harvard University), Varun Gauri (The World Bank), Drew Gerkey (Oregon State University), Karla Hoff (The World Bank), Betsy Levy Paluck (Princeton University) and Dimitris Xygalatas (University of Connecticut).    .

    Programs & Projects
  • 33.Cuba Program

    Facilitating information flows between Cuban scholars and their counterparts abroad.

    Programs & Projects
  • 34.DATA2GO.NYC

    Interactive Tool to Map Human Need and Well-Being in the New York Metro Area.

    Programs & Projects
  • 35.Digital Culture

    Exploring the intersections of technology, knowledge, and culture in a digital age.

    Programs & Projects
  • 36.Digital Literacy Initiative

    New modes of research and scholarly communication are changing the ways in which social scientists engage with, share, and evaluate scholarship.  From data analytics to geospatial and temporal visualization, computational modeling to social network analysis, these methods all demand increased attention to procedural thinking, critical engagement with the tools that shape knowledge production, and a stronger awareness of how to integrate digital methods with field-specific knowledge.  The Digital Culture program is working across the Council to foster greater digital capacity across all our programs through a new Digital Literacy Initiative. SSRC fellows attend the inaugural Digital Literacy Workshop at Purdue University, December 2016 Supported through generous funding from Richard Witten, a member of the SSRC Visiting Committee, the Digital Literacy Initiative is developing new opportunities for students engaged in our various fellowship programs (the Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship, International Dissertation Research Fellowship, and SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program). These initial offerings take a variety of forms—from in-person instruction to remote, self-directed learning—in order to explore the best ways to reach geographically-dispersed students studying a range of disciplines. Since 2017, 140 SSRC fellows from 57 colleges and universities have participated in supplemental workshops on data management and digital publishing, day-long workshops on developing digital projects, and online training through SSRC-sponsored modules on approaches to doing digital scholarship. More than 30 fellows have received travel support for training to enhance their graduate work with digital research skills. Current SSRC Opportunities Travel Bursary to the Digital Humanities Summer Institute The Digital Literacy Initiative will be offering a limited number of  travel bursaries and tuition scholarships to the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) for SSRC fellows. DHSI offers a robust set of courses on digital pedagogy, data visualization, open access options and models, scholarly research and communication, and much more. You can view a full course listing here.  The deadline to apply for this opportunity is February 14, 2018. The Digital Humanities Summer Institute is an annual training opportunity hosted at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. DHSI is the largest regular digital humanities skills training institute in the world, and has approximately 3,500 alumni. It is directed by Dr. Ray Siemens and coordinated by the  Electronic Textual Cultures Lab  on the University of Victoria campus. In 2016, DHSI welcomed over 800 participants across 43 courses led by an instructional team of around 70 individuals. To apply for the conference, read the instructions listed here and apply at the top of the page.  For questions related to the application process, please contact DHSI via email at institut@uvic.ca.  For questions related to SSRC eligibility, please contact the SSRC Digital Culture program at digitalculture@ssrc.org.

    Programs & Projects
  • 37.Dignity + Debt

    The Dignity + Debt Network, a collaboration between Princeton University and the Social Science Research Council, draws together academic researchers, advocates, and practitioners to work across sectors, contexts, and geographies in order to assess the economic and social costs assumed by those who bear debt and to examine the ladders to opportunity that household debt and lending may enable under specific conditions. Unbridled indebtedness forestalls future aspirations, but inclusive financial opportunities can foster social mobility. Developed and led by Princeton sociologist Frederick F. Wherry, the Dignity + Debt Network draws together data scientists and qualitative researchers in order to allow the study of large datasets alongside context-specific understanding of the role played by household debt. The network connects researchers already working on debt in specific locations—beginning in Brazil, Kenya, and the US—in order to promote comparative research. This research network will draw on consumer complaint databases, data from household budgets, and stories told by those who avail themselves of credit to shed new light on the experience of indebtedness. Finally, the network draws together researchers and financial service providers to help practitioners test and reshape various economic tools in order to enhance dignity and minimize degradation. By looking deeply in specific locations and broadly across different contexts, with cross-sectoral expertise, the network seeks to galvanize new thinking. The project prompts knowledge that allows new understanding of the role debt plays in everyday life across the globe and knowledge that is propositional—pointing the way to more productive modes of practice.

    Programs & Projects
  • 38.Dissertation Proposal Development (DPD) Program

    Supporting the development of innovative dissertation proposals in the humanities and social sciences.

    Programs & Projects
  • 39.Drugs, Security and Democracy Program

    Supporting research in Latin America and the Caribbean to inform drug policy.

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  • 40.East Africa: Forced Migration, Citizenship, and Belonging

    In collaboration with the International Refugee Rights Initiative based in Kampala, Uganda, the Forced Migration project of the SSRC's Migration Program is sponsoring a series of case studies with locally based refugee research and advocacy organizations to determine how access and denial to the rights of citizenship affect the displacement, protection, and return of displaced populations in the Great Lakes Region of East Africa and can inform policy reforms to enhance migrants’ rights.

    Programs & Projects
  • 41.Education Research Program

    Bringing social science to bear on local, national, and international educational challenges.

    Programs & Projects
  • 42.Education and Migration in Comparative Perspective

    As part of its Migration and Education initiative, the SSRC's Migration Program assembled a working group to focus on the educational philosophy and institutional arrangements and practices that shape educational pathways for immigrant and second generation students, as well as affecting their prospects for socioeconomic and civic integration, across a number of countries. The group met in London in 2005 to deliver working papers, some of which will be published in an edited volume, and several members, including SSRC Program Director Jennifer Holdaway, edited a special issue of the Teachers College Record (2009) reviewing the existing research as well as highlighting some of the difficulties of comparative studies.

    Programs & Projects
  • 43.Education and Migration in the United States

    As part of its work on migration and education, the SSRC's Migration Program assembled a working group to examine how educational institutions within the United States have responded to growing numbers of immigrant students as well as how immigrant families and communities navigate this country's educational system. The group met in New York in 2005 to deliver working papers on these topics, some of which will be published in an edited volume, and several members, including SSRC Program Director Jennifer Holdaway, edited a special issue of Teachers College Record  (2009) looking at how the governance structures of education shape the opportunities open to children of immigrant families in the United States.

    Programs & Projects
  • 44.FORHEAD Faculty and Curriculum Development Program

    …[中文] It is widely acknowledged that the relationship between development, environment and health is multidirectional and dynamic, and that professionals and citizens need an understanding of these issues that goes beyond the confines of disciplinary-based learning. Yet, an interdisciplinary approach remains the exception rather than the norm. Building on its network of experts, FORHEAD is promoting the introduction of an interdisciplinary perspective on health, environment, and development into higher education and training programs and strengthening capacity within institutions for ongoing collaboration and innovation. FORHEAD seeks to create curriculum materials, tailored to the Chinese context, which can be adapted for use in a variety of university-level courses relating to environment, health and development; develop cross-disciplinary networks of faculty and staff within and across institutions of higher education that can provide a basis for ongoing sharing of teaching materials and experience, and the development of innovative, locally-grounded approaches to environment and health problems; and encourage collaborations between universities and local communities to respond to local environment and health problems. FORHEAD Faculty and Curriculum Development Call for Proposals Projects supported in 2013 The Faculty and Curriculum Development for Environment, Health and Development in China Project is supported by the United Board.

    Programs & Projects
  • 45.Forum on Health, Environment and Development

    …[中文] CEHI collaborates closely with Chinese partner institutions through the Forum on Health, Environment and Development (FORHEAD). The Forum was founded to provide a China-based platform for building capacity and generating and sharing knowledge among researchers, policymakers, NGOs, and other stakeholders working in the field of environment, health, and development. The Forum holds an annual conference featuring new research, policy, and NGO initiatives in the field. In order to strengthen capacity to work on these issues, the Forum organizes summer institutes that provide intensive training for early career researchers and NGO staffers. Interdisciplinary working groups on particular topics synthesize current knowledge and develop cross-disciplinary and cross-institutional projects that can advance knowledge and provide the basis for informed policy. Outreach takes place through the FORHEAD website, formal and informal communication with policymakers, and publications.     The Forum is led by a consortium of institutions that bring different disciplinary and professional expertise. The current steering committee includes the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Institute of Geography and Natural Resources China), the China Agricultural University (College of Humanities and Development), Peking University (Institute of Environmental Economics), the Kunming Medical School, and the Social Science Research Council (China Environment and Health Initiative). Jennifer Holdaway of the SSRC and Professor Wang Wuyi of IGSNRR are the codirectors of FORHEAD. Visit the FORHEAD website.

    Programs & Projects
  • 46.Fostering Liberal Arts Knowledge and Connections Program

    The Fostering Liberal Arts Knowledge and Connections program aims to build faculty collaboration across disciplines and institutions with the goal of enriching teaching and research for faculties at liberal arts colleges and research universities. The program seeks to better link the imaginative and interpretive sensibilities of the liberal arts with the disciplinary-focused and rigorous ambitions of specialized social sciences. Through practice-oriented retreats the program promotes the interplay between teaching and research, how we work with students and how we work with colleagues. By crafting pedagogical initiatives the program links faculty at liberal arts colleges with those at research universities and enhances collaboration in both teaching and research.

    Programs & Projects
  • 47.HIV/AIDS Fellowship Program

    With support from the Open Society Institute, the SSRC's HIV/AIDS Program supported a pilot fellowship program providing funding opportunities for African researchers to carry out research on improving public health policy responses to the pandemic. In November 2006 eleven fellows from five of the most affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa received awards ranging from $10,000 to $25,000 for research on HIV/AIDS related to sexual violence and caregiving. Fellowship awards included participation in a research and capacity-strengthening seminar held in Durban, South Africa, in December 2006. Discussion focused on the interaction between public health policy at the global and local levels and on new conceptual frameworks and methodological approaches for assessing public health and HIV-related policies and programs.

    Programs & Projects
  • 48.Hemingway Document Preservation Project

    Facilitating efforts to restore Ernest Hemingway's Cuba papers for scholars and the general public.

    Programs & Projects
  • 49.Higher Education and Social Inequality in Comparative Perspective (U.S. and Egypt)

    The SSRC MENA Program has begun a two-year project on Higher Education and Social Inequality: Models, Tools and Transfers in Comparative Perspective (the U.S. and Egypt). Funded by the Ford Foundation, the project proposes to train a cohort of Egyptian junior scholars to pursue scholarly and policy research in the field of higher education, as related to issues of social inequality as well as equity and access to education. The training will comprise a mixture of modalities, from small training workshops, to an 8-week study stay at New York University/SSRC, to individual mentoring and conference participation. The project also aims at developing a model for a successful mentorship program that brings together senior and junior researchers, encourages collaboration and teamwork, and builds bridges between policy and research in higher education. The project hopes to lay the groundwork for future U.S./Egyptian collaboration in the field of higher education.

    Programs & Projects
  • 50.How Genocides End

    The ending of genocide has been treated in a normative manner with a focus on how it “ought” to end, as opposed to how, empirically, historical and contemporary episodes of genocide have come to an end. Since 2005 the SSRC has hosted a series of academic seminars as well as a web forum examining genocide in an empirical way, which have helped to take the field of genocide studies in a new direction. Working closely with the UN and African Union peace and security departments, we are planning additional seminars and detailed research studies.

    Programs & Projects