• 26.Contextual Knowledge and Field Experimentation

    The growth of field experimentation across several disciplines has been one of the most influential innovations in recent social science scholarship. It also is a mode of research well-suited to inform policy and practice. Such work has spawned a range of critiques regarding its claims to be a uniquely robust mode of explaining social phenomena, the generalizability of experimental findings, and ethical implications. This debate provides the opportunity for innovation in the methodological processes in the social sciences. There are many key questions to answer, including: When should deep contextual and historical knowledge influence the design and analysis of field experiments?  When and how does deep knowledge of the “field”—of place-based culture, language, history, or social relations—enrich or challenge experimental results?  At this initial stage, the Council is inviting scholars across a range of fields, including economics, political science, psychology, and anthropology, who are actively engaged in field experimentation and/or are committed to research that generates deeper contextual understanding. Together, they will help shape the agenda and design a project to investigate the conditions under which contextual knowledge could, and should, inform experimental research practices.

    Programs & Projects
  • 27.Cuba Program

    Facilitating information flows between Cuban scholars and their counterparts abroad.

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  • 28.DATA2GO.NYC

    Interactive Tool to Map Human Need and Well-Being in the New York Metro Area.

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  • 29.Democracy Fellows

    Every year, the Anxieties of Democracy program invites an internationally-renowned democracy expert to New York for a residency at the Social Science Research Council headquarters. Our Democracy Fellows help promote our mission to inform and enliven the public conversation about democracy with social science through a series of activities.  These include: public talks and debates that involve a broad and diverse audience as participants in the discussion, as well as seminars, which further open the dialogue to perspectives from a select group of the next generation of democracy scholars. We are honored to welcome Professor Danielle Allen (James Bryant Conant University Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University) as our 2017 Democracy Fellow. In addition to her widely-respected published works on justice, citizenship, and political equality, Allen is known for her commitment to civic engagement outside academe. Allen directs The Democratic Knowledge Project at Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study, leading four research projects with social ambitions--such as increasing high-school voter turnout and guiding the production of new media platforms that can better support youth civic and political engagement and youth development of citizenly capacities. Professor Allen will join us in November 2017. The theme of her residency is: Democracy and Justice. Stay tuned for further announcements about our public Democracy in the City events featuring Professor Allen, via @SSRCdemocracy and Facebook.   Archive 2016 Democracy Fellow: Professor Charles Taylor In 2016, the Council welcomed our second Democracy Fellow, Professor Charles Taylor, for a one-week residency from October 17-21. Emeritus Professor at McGill University, Charles Taylor is a world-renowned political philosopher, recognized most recently as the inaugural winner of the Berggruen Prize. Taylor's previous honors include the prestigious John W. Kluge, Templeton, and Kyoto prizes. Taylor’s philosophical approaches to the issues of modernity, democracy, equality, and inclusion in key texts such as A Secular Age (2007), Sources of the Self (1989), and Multiculturalism: Examining the Politics of Recognition (1994) have transformed conceptual categories in the humanities and social sciences. Throughout his career, Taylor has exemplified the crucial civic role played by university research, entwining his theoretical approaches with political participation in several domains: from the 1960s when Taylor ran in federal elections, to his key counsel for constitutional negotiations in Canada and around the world. The public was welcomed to two ‘Democracy in the City’ events during Professor Taylor’s residency: On Monday, October 17, 6-7:30pm, at the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College (47-49 East 65th St.): A talk by Charles Taylor, ‘Ways Democracy Can Slip Away,’ was followed by a comment and discussion led by the eminent political theorist Nancy Rosenblum, Harvard University Senator Joseph Clark Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government emerita. On Friday, October 21, 6-8pm, at Civic Hall (156 5th Av.), we presented 'Democratic Exclusion: A Think-In in Three Acts.' This unique exploration of democratic exclusion drew on debate, and music, to inspire reflection about an urgent problem faced by democracies around the world. It featured Keesha Gaskins-Nathan, Sarah Leonard, Tova Wang, Benjamin Hochman, and a live orchestra. We also invited local PhD candidates in the social sciences to apply for a seat in our 2016 Democracy Seminar led by Professor Taylor (cf. Call for Participants). Meeting at Council headquarters in Brooklyn, NY, the selected participants (cf. List of Participants) interrogated key texts and concepts relating to Professor Taylor’s chosen theme: ‘Some Crises of Democracy.’ The New Yorker’s Joshua Rothman also attended the seminar, featuring it in his well-circulated essay, ‘How to Restore Your Faith in Democracy’. For further information on the 2016 Democracy Se…

    Programs & Projects
  • 30.Digital Culture

    Exploring the intersections of technology, knowledge, and culture in a digital age.

    Programs & Projects
  • 31.Digital Literacy Initiative

    New modes of research and scholarly communication are changing the ways in which social scientists engage with, share, and evaluate scholarship.  From data analytics to geospatial and temporal visualization, computational modeling to social network analysis, these methods all demand increased attention to procedural thinking, critical engagement with the tools that shape knowledge production, and a stronger awareness of how to integrate digital methods with field-specific knowledge.  The Digital Culture program is working across the Council to foster greater digital capacity across all our programs through a new Digital Literacy Initiative. By building out online spaces for cohorts of Council fellows and providing them with training resources and a better understanding of available tools, we are instilling a digital literacy in a new generation of scholars so that they can use computational approaches when appropriate to their own research and, importantly, cultivate new cultures of scholarly exchange and evaluation. Currently, the Digital Literacy Initiative is developing new opportunities for students engaged in our various fellowship programs (DPDF Student Fellowships, Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellowships, and SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program). These initial offerings take a variety of forms—from in-person instruction to remote, self-directed learning—in order to explore the best ways to reach geographically-dispersed students studying a range of disciplines.   See below for details about activities, including open applications for travel bursaries to training workshops and conferences on digital scholarship and a resource section with links to training opportunities, useful tools, and other resources. Current Opportunities Travel Bursary to the Digital Humanities Summer Institute The Digital Literacy Initiative will be offering a limited number of  travel bursaries and tuition scholarships to the Digital Humanities Summer Institute for SSRC fellows. DHSI offers a robust set of courses on digital pedagogy, data visualization, open access options and models, scholarly research and communication, and much more. You can view a full course listing here.  The deadline to apply for this opportunity is February 14, 2017. The Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) is an annual training opportunity hosted at the University of Victoria in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. DHSI is the largest regular digital humanities skills training institute in the world, and has approximately 3,500 alumni. It is directed by Dr. Ray Siemens and coordinated by the  Electronic Textual Cultures Lab  on the University of Victoria campus. In 2016, DHSI welcomed over 800 participants across 43 courses led by an instructional team of around 70 individuals. To apply for the conference, read the instructions listed here and apply at the top of the page.  For questions related to the application process, please contact DHSI via email at institut@uvic.ca.  For questions related to SSRC eligibility, please contact the SSRC Digital Culture program at digitalculture@ssrc.org Recent Opportunities SSRC Digital Literacy Initiative: Application for Travel Bursaries to Purdue Symposium As part of a set of efforts to expand access to digital methods and approaches to scholarship, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) invites applications from graduate student fellows for travel bursaries to attend Purdue University’s 30th Symposium on African American Culture and Philosophy, “Exploring the ‘Humanity’ in the Digital Humanities: Africana/Black Studies’ Perspectives on the Digital Humanities.” The symposium will take place from December 1 to 3, 2016, with a pre-symposium for SSRC fellows starting on November 30. The SSRC will provide reimbursements of up to $900 per person for participation in the symposium and pre-symposium Eligibility: PhD students that are part of the SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program or have received fellowships from the Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowsh…

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  • 32.Dissertation Proposal Development (DPD) Program

    Supporting the development of innovative dissertation proposals in the humanities and social sciences.

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  • 33.Drugs, Security and Democracy Program

    Supporting research in Latin America and the Caribbean to inform drug policy.

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  • 34.East Africa: Forced Migration, Citizenship, and Belonging

    In collaboration with the International Refugee Rights Initiative based in Kampala, Uganda, the Forced Migration project of the SSRC's Migration Program is sponsoring a series of case studies with locally based refugee research and advocacy organizations to determine how access and denial to the rights of citizenship affect the displacement, protection, and return of displaced populations in the Great Lakes Region of East Africa and can inform policy reforms to enhance migrants’ rights.

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  • 35.Education Research Program

    Bringing social science to bear on local, national, and international educational challenges.

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  • 36.Education and Migration in Comparative Perspective

    As part of its Migration and Education initiative, the SSRC's Migration Program assembled a working group to focus on the educational philosophy and institutional arrangements and practices that shape educational pathways for immigrant and second generation students, as well as affecting their prospects for socioeconomic and civic integration, across a number of countries. The group met in London in 2005 to deliver working papers, some of which will be published in an edited volume, and several members, including SSRC Program Director Jennifer Holdaway, edited a special issue of the Teachers College Record (2009) reviewing the existing research as well as highlighting some of the difficulties of comparative studies.

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  • 37.Education and Migration in the United States

    As part of its work on migration and education, the SSRC's Migration Program assembled a working group to examine how educational institutions within the United States have responded to growing numbers of immigrant students as well as how immigrant families and communities navigate this country's educational system. The group met in New York in 2005 to deliver working papers on these topics, some of which will be published in an edited volume, and several members, including SSRC Program Director Jennifer Holdaway, edited a special issue of Teachers College Record  (2009) looking at how the governance structures of education shape the opportunities open to children of immigrant families in the United States.

    Programs & Projects
  • 38.FORHEAD Faculty and Curriculum Development Program

    …[中文] It is widely acknowledged that the relationship between development, environment and health is multidirectional and dynamic, and that professionals and citizens need an understanding of these issues that goes beyond the confines of disciplinary-based learning. Yet, an interdisciplinary approach remains the exception rather than the norm. Building on its network of experts, FORHEAD is promoting the introduction of an interdisciplinary perspective on health, environment, and development into higher education and training programs and strengthening capacity within institutions for ongoing collaboration and innovation. FORHEAD seeks to create curriculum materials, tailored to the Chinese context, which can be adapted for use in a variety of university-level courses relating to environment, health and development; develop cross-disciplinary networks of faculty and staff within and across institutions of higher education that can provide a basis for ongoing sharing of teaching materials and experience, and the development of innovative, locally-grounded approaches to environment and health problems; and encourage collaborations between universities and local communities to respond to local environment and health problems. FORHEAD Faculty and Curriculum Development Call for Proposals Projects supported in 2013 The Faculty and Curriculum Development for Environment, Health and Development in China Project is supported by the United Board.

    Programs & Projects
  • 39.Forum on Health, Environment and Development

    …[中文] CEHI collaborates closely with Chinese partner institutions through the Forum on Health, Environment and Development (FORHEAD). The Forum was founded to provide a China-based platform for building capacity and generating and sharing knowledge among researchers, policymakers, NGOs, and other stakeholders working in the field of environment, health, and development. The Forum holds an annual conference featuring new research, policy, and NGO initiatives in the field. In order to strengthen capacity to work on these issues, the Forum organizes summer institutes that provide intensive training for early career researchers and NGO staffers. Interdisciplinary working groups on particular topics synthesize current knowledge and develop cross-disciplinary and cross-institutional projects that can advance knowledge and provide the basis for informed policy. Outreach takes place through the FORHEAD website, formal and informal communication with policymakers, and publications.     The Forum is led by a consortium of institutions that bring different disciplinary and professional expertise. The current steering committee includes the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Institute of Geography and Natural Resources China), the China Agricultural University (College of Humanities and Development), Peking University (Institute of Environmental Economics), the Kunming Medical School, and the Social Science Research Council (China Environment and Health Initiative). Jennifer Holdaway of the SSRC and Professor Wang Wuyi of IGSNRR are the codirectors of FORHEAD. Visit the FORHEAD website.

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  • 40.Fostering Liberal Arts Knowledge and Connections Program

    The Fostering Liberal Arts Knowledge and Connections program aims to build faculty collaboration across disciplines and institutions with the goal of enriching teaching and research for faculties at liberal arts colleges and research universities. The program seeks to better link the imaginative and interpretive sensibilities of the liberal arts with the disciplinary-focused and rigorous ambitions of specialized social sciences. Through practice-oriented retreats the program promotes the interplay between teaching and research, how we work with students and how we work with colleagues. By crafting pedagogical initiatives the program links faculty at liberal arts colleges with those at research universities and enhances collaboration in both teaching and research.

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  • 41.HIV/AIDS Fellowship Program

    With support from the Open Society Institute, the SSRC's HIV/AIDS Program supported a pilot fellowship program providing funding opportunities for African researchers to carry out research on improving public health policy responses to the pandemic. In November 2006 eleven fellows from five of the most affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa received awards ranging from $10,000 to $25,000 for research on HIV/AIDS related to sexual violence and caregiving. Fellowship awards included participation in a research and capacity-strengthening seminar held in Durban, South Africa, in December 2006. Discussion focused on the interaction between public health policy at the global and local levels and on new conceptual frameworks and methodological approaches for assessing public health and HIV-related policies and programs.

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  • 42.Hemingway Document Preservation Project

    Facilitating efforts to restore Ernest Hemingway's Cuba papers for scholars and the general public.

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  • 43.Higher Education and Social Inequality in Comparative Perspective (U.S. and Egypt)

    The SSRC MENA Program has begun a two-year project on Higher Education and Social Inequality: Models, Tools and Transfers in Comparative Perspective (the U.S. and Egypt). Funded by the Ford Foundation, the project proposes to train a cohort of Egyptian junior scholars to pursue scholarly and policy research in the field of higher education, as related to issues of social inequality as well as equity and access to education. The training will comprise a mixture of modalities, from small training workshops, to an 8-week study stay at New York University/SSRC, to individual mentoring and conference participation. The project also aims at developing a model for a successful mentorship program that brings together senior and junior researchers, encourages collaboration and teamwork, and builds bridges between policy and research in higher education. The project hopes to lay the groundwork for future U.S./Egyptian collaboration in the field of higher education.

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  • 44.History, Networks, and Evolution

    …“In the short run, actors make relations, but in the long run, relations make actors” is a provocative assertion from John Padgett and Walter Powell’s The Emergence of Organizations and Markets (2012). This project takes this insight about the “long run” to reimagine how scholars can better understand large-scale historical change. Focusing on novelty—“Where do new types of people, organizations, social movements, states, and markets come from?”—the project conceives of history as interacting sets of dynamically evolving networks of people and practices. This core question is the basis for developing theoretical and empirical bridges between fields and approaches not usually in close conversation: not just history and social network analysis, but evolutionary biology and biochemistry colleagues who are interested in exchange with social scientists looking at the interactions across networks and the emergence of new social actors and institutions.

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  • 45.How Genocides End

    The ending of genocide has been treated in a normative manner with a focus on how it “ought” to end, as opposed to how, empirically, historical and contemporary episodes of genocide have come to an end. Since 2005 the SSRC has hosted a series of academic seminars as well as a web forum examining genocide in an empirical way, which have helped to take the field of genocide studies in a new direction. Working closely with the UN and African Union peace and security departments, we are planning additional seminars and detailed research studies.

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  • 46.Immigration and Religion in America

    The SSRC project on Migration and Religion convened a working group of American migration and religion scholars to compare past and present patterns in the religious adaptations of Mexican and Italian, Japanese and Korean, Jewish and Muslim, African-American and Haitian migrants. These patterns included integration into American religions, conversion to American religions, the establishment of new religions in America, and the incorporation of American religions into migrants’ own religious practices. The working group produced the edited volume, Immigration and Religion in America (NYU Press, 2008).

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  • 47.Initiative on Cuban Libraries and Archives

    Assisting Cuban libraries and archives to prepare for and respond to disaster.

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  • 48.Inter-Asian Connections II: Singapore (2010)

    The second conference in the InterAsian Connections Conference Series, hosted by the National University of Singapore (NUS), marked the beginning of a multiyear partnership between the SSRC, the Hong Kong Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences (HKIHSS) at the University of Hong Kong, and NUS. This conference featured five concurrent workshops coordinated by individual directors that showcased innovative research from across the social sciences and related disciplines. These workshops focused on broad themes of particular relevance to Asia, reconceptualized as a dynamic and interconnected historical, geographical, and cultural formation stretching from the Middle East through Eurasia and South Asia to East Asia. Themes included Old Histories / New Geographies, Migration: Mobilities and Displacement, Security and Insecurity, Transnational Knowledge Economies, and Translocal Trust Networks. The conference was structured to enable intensive “working group” interactions on specific research themes—a trademark of the series—as well as broader interactions on topics of mutual interest and concern. The third day of the conference featured a public keynote address delivered by Dr. Ackbar Abbas (professor of comparative literature, University of California–Irvine), “‘Poor Theory’ and Asian Cultural Practices [watch video here].” It also featured a plenary in celebration of professor Wang Gungwu’s eightieth birthday, with an address delivered by Philip A. Kuhn (the Francis Lee Higginson Professor of History and of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, emeritus, Harvard University), “China and Chineseness: Civilization as Historical Storehouse,” and a plenary devoted to “Electronic Media and Academic Interaction among Scholars in Asia” led by Paul H. Kratoska, managing director, NUS Press, and Michael Duckworth, publisher, Hong Kong University Press. CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS Click the following links for additional details on the five conference workshops, including full lists of workshop participants. » How Asia Became Territorial Workshop directors: Itty Abraham, University of Texas at Austin, US See Seng Tan, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore » Inter-Asian Temple and Trust Networks within and out of Southeast Asia Workshop director: Kenneth Dean, McGill University, Canada » Old Histories, New Geographies: Contrapuntal Mobilities of Trade and State across Asia Workshop directors: Engseng Ho, Duke University, US Lakshmi Subramanian, Jamia Millia Islamia, India » Regional Knowledge Hubs in Asia: The Social Sciences and Humanities in Science and Technology Human Capital (STHC) Workshop directors: V.V. Krishna, National University of Singapore Tim Turpin, University of Western Sydney, Australia » Reproduction Mobility in Asia Workshop directors: Biao Xiang, University of Oxford, UK Mika Toyota, National University of Singapore.

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  • 49.Inter-Asian Connections IV: Istanbul (2013)

    Inter-Asian Connections IV: Istanbul was hosted by Koç University and coorganized and cosponsored by an expanded set of institutional partners that included Yale University, the National University of Singapore (NUS), the Hong Kong Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences (HKIHSS) at the University of Hong Kong, and Göttingen University.   In its effort to update the conference series on an ongoing basis, the organizers solicited conference workshop proposals around an expanded and diverse set of fourteen broad, umbrella themes. Six workshops were selected around five themes: The Post-Neoliberal State, Connected Empires, Picturing and Fictionalizing Asia, The Social Life of Capital in Asian Cities, and Food and Foodways. In addition, the conference’s hosts at Koç University organized a seventh workshop focused on Inequalities in Asian Societies. As throughout the series, the conference structure was designed to enable intensive “working group” interactions on a specific research theme, as well as broader interactions on topics of mutual interest and concern. The conference featured a public keynote address delivered by Willem van Schendel (University of Amsterdam), “Recombining Asia, or Three Wars and a Conversion,” [watch video here]. The conference also featured a roundtable discussion organized by members of the Transregional Virtual Research Institute focused on “the new global left,” as well as plenary sessions and closed workshop sessions. In addition, Deniz Kandiyoti gave an opening plenary address [watch video here], “Ambiguous Locations/Shifting Vocations: Turkey in Asia,” in which she challenges the “Westward” orientation central to conventional accounts of Turkish modernization with her own personal account of less acknowledged influences. VIDEO Opening Plenary Address: "Ambiguous Locations/Shifting Vocations: Turkey in Asia" - Deniz Kandiyoti Keynote Address: "Recombining Asia, or Three Wars and a Conversion" - Willem van Schendel   CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS Click the following links for additional details on the seven conference workshops, including full lists of workshop participants. » “After Neoliberalism?” The Future of Postneoliberal State and Society in Asia Workshop directors: Emel Akçali, Department of International Relations and European Studies, Central European University, Hungary Ho-Fung Hung, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University, US Lerna Yanik, Department of Political Science and Public Administration, Kadir Has University, Istanbul » Asian Early Modernities: Empires, Bureaucrats, Confessions, Borders, Merchants Workshop directors: Kaya Sahin, Department of History, Indiana University, US Hendrik Spruyt, Department of Political Science, Northwestern University, US » Contemporary Art and the Inter-Asian Imaginary Workshop directors: Alice Jim, Department of Art History, Concordia University, Canada Henry Tsang, Faculty of Culture and Community, emily carr university of art + design, Canada » Inequalities in Asian Societies: Bringing Back Class Analysis Workshop directors: Deniz Yükseker, Sociology, Koç University, Turkey Ching Kwan Lee, Sociology, UCLA, US Can Nacar, History, Koç University, Turkey » Porous Enclaves: Inter-Asian Residential Projects and the Popular Classes from Istanbul to Seoul Workshop directors: John Friedmann, School of Community and Regional Planning, University of British Columbia, Canada Erik Harms, Anthropology and Area and International Studies, Yale University, US » Rescuing Taste from the Nation: Oceans, Borders, and Culinary Flows Workshop directors: Krishnendu Ray, Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, New York University, US Cecilia Leong-Salobir, University of Wollongong, US » The Sounds and Scripts of Languages in Motion Workshop directors: Jing Tsu, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Yale University, US Ronit Ricci, School of Culture, History and Language, College of Asia-Pacific, Australian National University.

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  • 50.InterAsia Partnership

    Since 2009, the Council has worked in collaboration with multiple core institutional partners to construct InterAsia as a new research site. The InterAsia Partnership has built international and interdisciplinary scholars’ networks, transformed scholarly approaches and research agendas, and promoted the development of innovative comparisons on a number of cross-regional and transregional themes. Activities include the InterAsian Connections Conference Series, a Transregional Virtual Research Institute, and various nodal activities that build on the institutional strengths of each partner, developing regional loci for important InterAsia research and teaching. Core partner institutions include Duke University Global Asia Initiative, the Global and Transregional Studies Platform at the University of Göttingen (Germany), the Hong Kong Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Hong Kong, Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore, Seoul National University Asia Center, and Yale University MacMillan Center.        .

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