• 101.Religion and the Public Sphere

    Advancing and mobilizing new knowledge about religion, secularism, and public life.

    Programs & Projects
  • 102.Scholarly Borderlands

    Shaping the craft of social science by facilitating collaboration and innovation across disciplines.

    Programs & Projects
  • 103.Sexual Violence and Exploitation: Assessment, Monitoring and Reporting

    On behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the SSRC organized and hosted a Technical Consultation on Sexual Violence and Exploitation in Conflict Situations on December 15-16, 2005. The Consultation convened a wide range of experts, including scholars and practitioners across the fields of public health, human rights, demography, epidemiology, political science, statistics, and conflict resolution. The goal was to assess the potential and propose first steps for designing and piloting a standardized system for the assessment, monitoring, and reporting of sexual violence and exploitation in conflict situations. .

    Programs & Projects
  • 104.Sloan Scholars Mentoring Network

    Supporting diversity in STEM through professional development, mentoring, networking, & leadership training.

    Programs & Projects
  • 105.Social Data Initiative

    Recent revelations about the abuse of Facebook data and spread of disinformation make clear that social media can have negative ramifications for society. Today the SSRC begins an extraordinary Social Data Initiative at the frontiers of digital culture to examine the problem, explore questions about the responsible use of social network data, and generate insights to inform solutions.   .

    Programs & Projects
  • 106.Syllabus Collaboration: Democratic Erosion

    We are proud to partner with Democratic Erosion, a cross-university collaborative course that aims to help students critically and systematically evaluate the risks to democracy both in the United States and abroad through the lens of theory, history, and social science. Democratic Erosion is a unique experiment in collaborative pedagogy and learning; the students in the initiative contribute to an undergraduate-written blog, and this term the initiative is also producing a report for USAID. As part of the partnership between Anxieties of Democracy and Democratic Erosion, in the summer of 2018 several students’ work will be featured as part of a special series in the Democracy Papers. The syllabus initiative is led by Robert Blair, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs at Brown University. For more information regarding Democratic Erosion, please contact him and/or Hannah Baron, the teaching and research assistant for the course. For questions about the Democracy Papers or the Anxieties of Democracy program, send an email to democracy@ssrc.org. To follow us on Twitter, please click here: @SSRCanxieties.

    Programs & Projects
  • 107.The China-Africa Knowledge Project

    Strengthening cross-regional research networks and collaboration.

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  • 108.The China-Africa Knowledge Project Resource Hub

    The China-Africa Knowledge Project Resource Hub is a one-stop shop for researchers and practitioners working on the China-Africa relationship. As the primary platform for the work of the Social Science Research Council’s China-Africa Knowledge Project, this site actively builds generative connections between scholars across disciplines and regions while organizing a growing and fragmented body of knowledge and connecting it to important trends in the social sciences relevant for understanding Africa’s new international relations.  As host to the Chinese in Africa / Africans in China Research Network, it widens the reach of existing cross-regional communities of knowledge. For more information and updates about the China-Africa Knowledge Project, visit china-africa.ssrc.org.

    Programs & Projects
  • 109.The China-Africa Working Group

    Strengthening cross-regional research networks and collaboration.

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  • 110.The Chinese in Africa/Africans in China Research Network (CA/AC Research Network)

    Strengthening cross-regional research networks and collaboration.

    Programs & Projects
  • 111.The DR Congo Affinity Group

    Established on 1 November 2012, the Affinity Group on the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is a network of leading scholars and researchers working on the DRC who are deeply familiar with the context of the current challenges facing the country after two decades of war, and who can provide long-term analysis and recommendations to help inform international engagement in the region. This “brain trust” on the DRC provides analysis of the crises facing the DRC and situates these challenges in a long-term view of the political, social, and security trends in the country and the region. Where necessary, the Affinity Group identifies gaps in existing evidence and undertakes the necessary research to fill identified knowledge gaps. As with the landmark Ford Foundation Study Group on South Africa in the 1980s, and the short-lived UN Secretary-General's Resource Group on the DRC established in 1998 at the start of the Second Congo War, the Affinity Group on the DRC seeks to keep its analysis and research firmly distinct from advocacy efforts, yet remains flexible to respond to and help inform policy processes. DRC Affinity Group members: Download DR Congo Affinitiy Group Member Biographies [.pdf] Tatiana Carayannis (Project Director) Social Science Research Council Federico Borello Center for Civilians in Conflict Mvemba Dizolele Johns Hopkins University Jean-Marie Guéhenno International Crisis Group  Fabienne Hara Sciences-Po, Paris School of International Affairs Pascal Kambale Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA) Michel Noureddine Kassa Initiative for a Cohesive Leadership in the DRC Jason Stearns Center on International Cooperation  Jean Omasombo Tshonda The Royal Museum for Central Africa at Tervuren and University of Kinshasa Anneke Van Woudenberg Human Rights Watch Koen Vlassenroot University of Ghent Herbert Weiss The City University of New York.

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  • 112.The Democracy Papers

    The Democracy Papers highlight and summarize new research presented at conferences and workshops related to the Anxieties of Democracy program. The brief essays cover topics including the consequences of party polarization, the dynamics of political participation, encouraging bipartisan compromise, addressing climate change, and representing future generations in current democratic institutions. The Democracy Papers are hosted on Items, the SSRC's digital essay forum. If you enjoy the Democracy Papers, you may also like our collection of reflection essays on the anxieties of democracy, the Inaugural Democracy Papers. These pieces were collected for the launch of the Anxieties of Democracy program in 2014-15.

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  • 113.The Drug Research Papers

    Disseminating research on drug policy.

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  • 114.The Fourth Wave: Violence, Gender, Culture & HIV in the 21st Century

    UNESCO commissioned the SSRC'S HIV/AIDS Program in 2006 to assess the social science, public health, and public policy literature dealing with the sociocultural and gender dimensions of the HIV and AIDS pandemic. Following the publication of an in-depth literature review, the SSRC and UNESCO invited more than twenty senior scholars, policy makers, and practitioners from around the world to contribute to an edited volume about the failure of policies and programs to respond to the growing feminization of the HIV and AIDS pandemic. The volume, co-edited by SSRC Senior Adviser Jennifer Klot and medical anthropologist Vinh-Kim Nguyen,The Fourth Wave: Violence, Gender, Culture & HIV in the 21st Century will be co-published by the SSRC and UNESCO in 2009. Working papers and an interactive essay forum will be launched in summer 2009. .

    Programs & Projects
  • 115.The Immanent Frame

    Secularism, religion, and the public sphere.

    Programs & Projects
  • 116.The Religious Lives of Migrant Minorities

    The SSRC Migration Program is sponsoring research to investigate the family, community, and national lives of Christian (Pentecostal), Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist migrants in London, Johannesburg, and Kuala Lumpur. The plan is to produce edited volumes about the religious lives of migrant minorities in each of city and a fourth volume on the themes common to the three sites. This project marks the first attempt by social scientists to compare internationally the role of world religions in the adaptation of migrants to different national contexts.

    Programs & Projects
  • 117.Thematic Reports

    Exploring well-being issues affecting Americans.

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  • 118.Transregional Collaboratory on the Indian Ocean

    The Transregional Collaboratory on the Indian Ocean is born of environmental realities – the Indian Ocean is the fastest warming ocean in the world – and principles central to the SSRC mission. The program is part of the Transnational Initiative, a thematic portfolio of the Council. The Transregional Collaboratory unites scholars across the region and the globe focusing on the implications of environmental issues such as saltwater intrusion, disruption of traditional trade patterns, and changing migration dynamics. While the Collaboratory focuses on a central location and theme, it disrupts traditional ways of understanding regional and environmental issues by bridging geographic, institutional, and academic boundaries. The program is purposefully designed to foster a new model of transnational research ethics that emphasizes South-South collaboration and supports institutions and researchers that have been overlooked by models of research funding and collaboration historically driven by institutions from the Global North. This project emerged from several strands of topical inquiry within SSRC programs, as well as a burgeoning attentiveness to the role that funders and funding collaborators in the Global North can play in perpetuating inequalities in knowledge production in the Global South, even via projects that were nominally collaborative. The Collaboratory seeks to support novel modes of engagement through which locally situated researchers can access the resources needed to coproduce knowledge alongside international peers. With generous funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this program will issue its first call for research proposals in early 2020. Funded research will form the basis for the organizing of collaborative working groups over the next several years. Participants will be part of an emerging cadre of scholars generating new insights on social, economic and political dynamics across the Indian Ocean in the context of climate and environmental change. If you would like to receive updates on program activities and opportunities, please sign up here.

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  • 119.Transregional Virtual Research Institute

    Media, Activism, and the New Political: InterAsian Perspectives.

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  • 120.Travel Grants for Cuban Scholars

    Providing Cuban scholars access to international scholarly networks.

    Programs & Projects
  • 121.Uncertainty in Extreme Weather Events

    Uncertainty pervades the prediction and experience of hazardous weather.  It emerges in the development of weather research and models, the construction and communication of forecasts, the interpretation of those forecasts and perceptions of weather risks, and in the complex process of responding to and recovering from hazardous weather. While uncertainty is inherent to meteorological processes and our ability to predict them, there are also more entangled sources of social and cultural ambiguity that emerge, interact, and propagate throughout the lifecycle of hazardous weather events. Significant research exists within the field of risk communication regarding meteorological uncertainty in weather forecasts, how it is communicated, and how it is understood, but less attention has been paid to these other types of uncertainty. People engaged at any stage of the process from prediction to recovery – including atmospheric scientists, operational forecasters, emergency managers, broadcasters, and members of the public – interpret, infer, and consider uncertainty in their perceptions and decision making. However, little is known about how to identify or characterize the non-meteorological variables that are always relevant to decision-making in the face of a forecast or warning.   This project brings together experts and practitioners from across the social and natural sciences to examine how further social science research can enrich our understanding of context, communication, and social dynamics that ultimately impact decision-making and behavior during extreme weather events.   Project Coordinators: Julie Demuth Project Scientist, Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Jennifer Henderson  Postdoctoral Fellow, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Heather Lazrus Project Scientist, Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research.

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  • 122.Understanding Violent Conflict

    Strengthening the evidence base to better understand the complexities of violent conflict.

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  • 123.University Governance and Autonomy in the Changing Landscape of Higher Education in the Arab World

    The SSRC's Middle East and North Africa Program has undertaken an initiative to explore the role of the Arab university. We are focusing in particular on the efforts being made by academic communities to secure critical spheres of autonomy (vis-à-vis teaching, research, and publishing)--a process that is crucial for a functioning higher education sector and a lively public sphere. Another area of focus is Arab university governance: how has it evolved in response to national, regional, and global restructurings, and what impact has this had on the role of the university?.

    Programs & Projects
  • 124.Viet Nam Population Health Programme: Strategic Learning and Assessment

    Mobilizing knowledge to assess health and social interventions in Vietnam.

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  • 125.Ways of Water

    In recent decades, freshwater resources essential for human health and livelihoods have come under increasing pressure. Even as demand rises for human and industrial uses, water is less available because of privatization, or increasingly dangerous, as industrial and agricultural activity introduce new forms of pollutants, and climate change upends the predictability of water cycles. In response, new efforts to ensure water quality and access for both human and nonhuman users within a unified environmental stewardship perspective are proliferating. At the same time, scholarly attention to water largely remains siloed inside distinct disciplinary boundaries.  This working group aims to engage water from within the scholarly borderlands. Trained in the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies, they approach water as a multiplicity of objects. It is always present, even as it emerges in particular historical and cultural contexts, contingent upon the actions of human and non-human actors alike. However tempting it is to think of water as H20, water does not exist in the abstract; it cannot—in practice—be reduced to a formula. Whether an object of scientific study, aesthetic appreciation, economic use, ecological necessity, or everyday consumption, it is only encountered in, through, and as different kinds of bodies.  Working alongside scholars from a range of disciplines, this project seeks not only to identify the lacunae inherent in current approaches to knowing water, but also to determine the synergistic possibilities opened by combining the strengths of our disciplinary frames and methodologies. In approaching water as an active object, they aim to open up new pathways and methodologies for understanding and intervention. Project Chairs Etienne Benson Janice and Julian Bers Assistant Professor in the Social Sciences, University of Pennsylvania Christy Spackman Assistant Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society, Arizona State University   Current Participants   Samer Alatout (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Aimee Bahng (Pomona College), Andrea Ballestero (Rice University), Debjani Bhattacharyya (Drexel University), Kevin Dawson (University of California, Merced), Hi'ilei Hobart (Columbia University), Eve Mosher (Liquid Cities and Works on Water), Amanda Schachter (SLO Architecture), and Marsha Weisiger (University of Oregon).

    Programs & Projects