• 101.The Immanent Frame

    Secularism, religion, and the public sphere.

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  • 102.The Religious Lives of Migrant Minorities

    The SSRC Migration Program is sponsoring research to investigate the family, community, and national lives of Christian (Pentecostal), Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist migrants in London, Johannesburg, and Kuala Lumpur. The plan is to produce edited volumes about the religious lives of migrant minorities in each of city and a fourth volume on the themes common to the three sites. This project marks the first attempt by social scientists to compare internationally the role of world religions in the adaptation of migrants to different national contexts.

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  • 103.Transregional Virtual Research Institute

    Media, Activism, and the New Political: InterAsian Perspectives.

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  • 104.Understanding Violent Conflict

    Strengthening the evidence base to better understand the complexities of violent conflict.

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  • 105.University Governance and Autonomy in the Changing Landscape of Higher Education in the Arab World

    The SSRC's Middle East and North Africa Program has undertaken an initiative to explore the role of the Arab university. We are focusing in particular on the efforts being made by academic communities to secure critical spheres of autonomy (vis-à-vis teaching, research, and publishing)--a process that is crucial for a functioning higher education sector and a lively public sphere. Another area of focus is Arab university governance: how has it evolved in response to national, regional, and global restructurings, and what impact has this had on the role of the university?.

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  • 106.Viet Nam Population Health Programme: Strategic Learning and Assessment

    Mobilizing knowledge to assess health and social interventions in Vietnam.

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  • 107.Vietnam Program

    Working to strengthen social science research capacity and links to policymaking in Vietnam.

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  • 108.Web Anthology on Migrant Remittances and Development: Research Perspectives

    In response to the growing interest in the possible contributions that migrants’ remittances can make to development, we have assembled an anthology of research articles that address this process as related to both internal and international migration. The overall goal has been to provide access to articles that bring key conceptual, methodological, and theoretical approaches to topics of central interest to both researchers and policy makers through contemporary research drawn from across the social sciences. Though much of the research is economic in approach, we also provide research based in anthropology, sociology, political science, and other disciplines.   This anthology is an experiment in publication. By agreement with the authors and original publishers, the articles provided for free downloading here will be available for one year, until March 2010. At that time we will reassess whether the anthology should and can be continued and, if so, in what form. Most publishers have allowed free access to their publications; some have charged a fee or imposed other restrictions; others have refused to permit open access to their publications on a “third party” website, even for a fee. Readers of this anthology are encouraged to download the articles provided for personal and educational use.   To download the anthology, go to:  Web Anthology Online Forum.

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  • 109.West Africa: Forced Migration and Human Rights

    To explore how a human rights framework might strengthen protections for forced migrants, the SSRC Migration Program organized research between social scientists and practitioners of international humanitarian and human rights organizations.  Research focused on the causes of forced displacement, protections and work, resettlement, and return of Sierra Leonean forced migrants.

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  • 110.Work with Economists in Cuba

    Fostering new systems in Cuba for distributing goods and services.

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  • 111.Working Group on Climate Change

    What does climate change have to do with democracy? Quite a bit, it turns out. But the political dimensions of climate policy have not been adequately explored by researchers, while the climate problem is at a critical moment both of understanding and political action. Professors Robert O. Keohane (Princeton University) and Nancy Rosenblum (Harvard University) are leading an interdisciplinary group of scholars to address the difficulties that democracies encounter in responding effectively to climate change. The temporal and geographical dimensions of climate change are unusual for democratic institutions, and its public goods nature poses difficulties in getting the incentives for effective action right. The climate change policies of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, exemplified in the Kyoto Protocol, have not worked well. Framing the issue almost entirely in terms of reducing emissions, rather than also emphasizing adaptation and building infrastructure, generated a narrow pathway toward effectiveness. With respect to this mitigation pathway, the emphasis under Kyoto was on legally binding commitments, with targets and timetables set in advance of state action—a demanding approach that would have required greater than available political commitment to succeed. COP21 negotiations took a different approach, beginning with national pledges for voluntary action, with arrangements—as yet, not sufficiently well-defined—for periodic review and transparency. Whether this approach generates more progress will depend in considerable measure on how whether the review process is progressively strengthened and how well it works over the next few years. The Working Group on Climate Change is taking a longer-term perspective, aiming to catalyze new understandings of the politics, sociology, and political theory of climate change policy in a historical and comparative perspective. The aim is to stimulate and reorient social scientific work on climate change, encouraging linkage to the study of social movements in the United States and elsewhere, to the analysis of institutions, international, transnational, and domestic, and to rethink received wisdom on the relation of science and democratic deliberation. The hope therefore is to make a contribution to politically effective action which responds meaningfully to ongoing climate change. For news and announcements about this working group and other Anxieties of Democracy program activities, please click here: @SSRCdemocracy.   Co-Chairs Robert O. Keohane Professor of International Affairs, Princeton University Nancy Rosenblum Senator Joseph Clark Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government, Harvard University   Members Scott Barrett Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics, Columbia University Jessica Green Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, New York University David M. Konisky Associate Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University Bloomington Melissa Lane Class of 1943 Professor of Politics, Princeton University Douglas McAdam The Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology, Stanford University Michael Oppenheimer Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs, Princeton University Naomi Oreskes Professor of the History of Science and Affiliated Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University Johannes Urpelainen Associate Professor of Political Science, Columbia University   Image credit: “Iceberg with Hole” by Brocken Inaglory [CC 2.0].

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  • 112.Working Group on Institutions

    The American public’s trust in government, and especially in Congress, the central institution of representative democracy in the U.S., stands near all-time lows. In this mistrust of democratic institutions, Americans are not alone in the world. Yet they are right to worry. The U.S. system, with its complex array of checks and balances, usually requires broad consensus to function. But this consensus rarely emerges in this era of ideological polarization, close two-party competition, and hyperpartisanship. Meanwhile, policy challenges continue to mount, amidst growing economic, social, and political inequalities. The Anxieties of Democracy program’s Working Group on Institutions was created to address contemporary concerns about the performance and legitimacy of representative political institutions. Co-chaired by Professors Frances Lee (University of Maryland) and Nolan McCarty (Princeton University), this group operates under two assumptions: first, polarized parties are a fact of life, given the long evolutionary processes that have ideologically sorted the parties and that have finally brought U.S. parties into alignment with those in other advanced democracies. Second, major constitutional reform altering the U.S. system will not be forthcoming. If these two assumptions are correct, what does this mean for policymaking, federalism, and the functioning of American institutions of government?   Products will aim to stimulate and reorient social scientific work on government institutions, linked to the study of social movements and institutions in the United States and elsewhere. For news and announcements about this working group and other Anxieties of Democracy program activities, please click here: @SSRCdemocracy.   Co-Chairs Frances Lee Professor of Government and Politics, University of Maryland Nolan McCarty Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Princeton University   Members Brandice Canes-Wrone Donald E. Stokes Professor of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University Daniel Carpenter Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard University Anthony Chen Associate Professor of Sociology and Political Science, Northwestern University Elisabeth Gerber Jack L. Walker, Jr. Professor of Public Policy, University of Michigan Daniel Gillion Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania Matthew Grossmann Associate Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University Meg Jacobs Research Scholar, Princeton University Suzanne Mettler Clinton Rossiter Professor of American Institutions, Cornell University Gillian Metzger Stanley H. Fuld Professor of Law, Columbia University David J. Samuels Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Political Science, University of Minnesota Eric Schickler Jeffrey and Ashley McDermott Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley Mark Schmitt Director, Political Reform Program, New America Foundation Arthur Spirling Associate Professor of Politics and Data Science, New York University Charles Stewart III Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology   Image credit: “2014 United States Capitol scaffolding 03” by Farragutful [CC BY-SA 4.0]  .

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  • 113.Working Group on Participation

    What are the obstacles to effective citizenship? How do these condition the representation of citizen preferences and the legitimacy of the political system? Co-chaired by Professors Larry Bartels (Vanderbilt University) and Claudine Gay (Harvard University), this working group focuses on the capacity of citizens in democratic polities to equally and impartially access and influence political life. It also explores how these obstacles are likely to evolve over time and what might be done to strengthen the connection of citizens and civil society to the state. The ambition is to stimulate new scholarship and to introduce social science research into public conversations about citizen participation. The organizing mandate for this working group was designed broadly in order to provide ample opportunities for working group members to shape the group’s direction. We have invited colleagues with the proclivity to contribute effectively to this wide-ranging enterprise; the disciplines of law, government, political science, history, economics, and sociology are represented, as are practitioners in politics and the media. For news and announcements about this working group and other Anxieties of Democracy program activities, please click here: @SSRCdemocracy.   Co-Chairs Larry Bartels May Werthan Shayne Chair of Public Policy and Social Science, Vanderbilt University Claudine Gay Wilbur A. Cowett Professor of Government and of African and African American Studies and Dean of Social Science, Harvard University   Members Elisabeth Clemens William Rainey Harper Professor of Sociology, University of Chicago Cathy Cohen David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago Katherine J. Cramer Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison Mickey Edwards Vice President, Aspen Institute Archon Fung Ford Foundation Professor of Democracy and Citizenship, Harvard University Hahrie Han Anton Vonk Associate Professor of Environmental Politics, University of California, Santa Barbara Marc J. Hetherington Professor of Political Science, Vanderbilt University Alexander Keyssar Matthew W. Stirling Jr. Professor of History and Social Policy, Harvard University Amy Lerman Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science, University of California, Berkeley Dara Strolovitch Associate Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies and Affiliated Faculty, Department of Politics, Princeton University Richard Yeselson Contributing Editor, Dissent Magazine   Image credit: “Vote” by Kodak Views [CC BY 2.0].

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  • 114.Working Group on Politics of Distribution

    The working group on distribution will focus on resource distribution. Social cleavages of class, race and ethnicity, immigration, gender, and age are all well-established lines of analysis for posing questions about distribution. The overlap of such cleavages with spatial patterns – within metropolitan areas, within nations, and across nations – provides another set of lenses. One starting point is to assess what we know so far about the impact of the Great Recession on representative institutions and the public sector within different temporal, national, and subnational settings. For news and announcements about this working group and other Anxieties of Democracy program activities, please click here: @SSRCdemocracy. Co-Chairs Frances McCall RosenbluthDamon Wells Professor of Political Science, Yale University Margaret WeirProfessor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Brown University   Members Carles BoixRobert Garrett Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Princeton University Andrea Louise Campbell Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science, MIT Andra Gillespie Associate Professor of Political Science, Emory University Paola Giuliano Associate Professor of Economics, UCLA Anderson School of Management Jacob HackerStanley B. Resor Professor of Political Science, Yale University Alice Kessler-Harris R. Gordon Hoxie Professor Emerita of American History, Columbia University Ilyana KuziemkoProfessor of Economics, Princeton University K. Sabeel RahmanAssistant Professor of Law, Brooklyn Law School  Kathleen Thelen Ford Professor of Political Science, MIT Image credit: “Not Equal” by holeymoon [CC BY 2.0].

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  • 115.Working Group on Security

    Established democracies face recurring problems of 'Security and Democratic Exceptions' that raise hard questions about whether it is possible to proceed within the ambit of democratic norms and institutions. This new working group will probe not only the capacities but the repertoire of institutions and ideas which established democracies utilize to deal with actual and perceived 'predators,' external and internal. In examining these strains, the group will take up a range of issues that include population movements, war, terror, and tensions of security and privacy. For news and announcements about this working group and other Anxieties of Democracy program activities, please click here: @SSRCdemocracy. Co-Chairs Samuel IssacharoffBonnie and Richard Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law, New York UniversityKiron K. SkinnerAssociate Professor of International Relations and Political Science, Carnegie Mellon University; W. Glenn Campbell Research Fellow, Hoover Institution Members  Jessica D. BlankshainAssistant Professor of National Security Affairs, U.S. Naval War College Gabriella BlumRita E. Hauser Professor of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, Harvard Law School Paul CollierProfessor of Economics and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford Shaheed FatimaBarrister, Blackstone Chambers Emily O. GoldmanAssociate Professor of Political Science, University of California, Davis; Co-Director, Joint Center for International and Security Studies Stephen D. Krasner Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations, Stanford UniversityUday Singh MehtaProfessor of Political Science, CUNY Graduate CenterPasquale Pasquino Global Distinguished Professor of Politics, New York UniversityDana PriestInvestigative Reporter, The Washington Post; The John S. and James L. Knight Chair in Public Affairs Journalism, The University of Maryland Julian E. Zelizer Professor of History and Public Affairs, Princeton University Image credit: “One Nation Under CCTV” by ogglog [CC BY 2.0] Co-Chairs Stephen Ansolabehere Professor of Government, Harvard University Margaret Weir Professor of Political Science and Sociology and Avice Saint Chair in Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley Co-Chairs Stephen Ansolabehere Professor of Government, Harvard University Margaret Weir Professor of Political Science and Sociology and Avice Saint Chair in Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley  .

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  • 116.Working Group: Curating Knowledge

    Curating Knowledge Under Digital Conditions Transformations associated with digitization are causing significant shifts in the “scholarly ecosystem” of universities, book and journal publishers, and libraries that have historically served to set standards for the judgment of scholarly quality and impact.  In light of the increased access to knowledge that digitization allows, maintaining and enhancing standards of quality while democratizing access. Key questions addressed by this working group include: What is the role of the traditional “gatekeepers” of scholarly knowledge in this context? When are more open forms of curation compelling, and when are more traditional and demanding approaches appropriate? How can core values and practices of scholarship (e.g. peer review) be preserved under changing conditions, and how should scholarly practices and institutions be modified and adapted in light of these transformations? By what criteria should libraries, archives, and other curatorial institutions make choices in regard to what they collect and preserve? This working group brings together representatives from these different realms in order to discuss the principles, standards, and practices that should govern editorial curation. Co-chairs: Mary Lee KennedyChief Library Officer, New York Public Library Michael SchudsonProfessor of Journalism and Sociology, Columbia University.

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  • 117.Working Group: Digital Social Science

    Digital Social Science This working group will engage how social scientists use digital tools, methods, and data sources in their research. This includes “big data” (whether from the internet, social media, geo-spatial techniques, or more traditional quantitative and textual sources); the use of visualization tools for the collection, organization and analysis of data; and other ways in which data and information science is intersecting or could intersect with the social sciences. Along with these opportunities come serious challenges—scientific, practical and ethical—that may result from the expanding use of these forms of knowledge. Key questions addressed by the working group include: What can “big data” tell us about our social world and how it works—and what can’t we learn from it?  How can social science shape the norms and rules for how “big data” is collected and made available? How can we establish partnerships between social scientists and the businesses that own proprietary data, as well as the algorithms that organize their collection and use, for scientific and public benefit—while at the same time protecting privacy of research subjects when “informed consent” is neither required nor expected? How will new tools like information visualization, increasingly being used in fields like history, shape how social scientists are trained, and how they collaborate with each other? The group brings together a range of interested scholars and constituencies—social scientists, data scientists, legal scholars, digital humanists, and relevant actors in the private and public sector—to more deeply understand the ramifications of these innovations in the study of society, and to discover and shape how they might be used in ethical and public-minded ways. Co-chairs: Victoria StoddenAssociate Professor of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Duncan WattsPrincipal Researcher, Microsoft Research.

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  • 118.Working Group: Transparency and Reliability in the Social Sciences

    Reliability and Transparency in the Social Sciences Enabled by advances in digital technology, the availability of social science research has increased exponentially, and the stakes of making it so have increased with it. Recent high-profile media coverage concerning the practices and reliability of the social sciences has brought it much attention, and not all of which is positive. More accessible data can deepen the reliability of social science, and is called for by funders and an increasing number of journals in a range of fields.  Digital technology also allows for scholars to provide access to the analytical process they use to connect evidence to interpretative and theoretical claims in ways not possible within the space constraints of a journal article.  Making this process “transparent” is central to sustaining a broader scholarly conversation. While the benefits of access to knowledge for use by the broader research community are many and varied, research transparency as a scholarly value is at times in tension with other values. These include the protection and privacy of human subjects as well as the safeguarding of intellectual property, not trivial for scholars who seek “first use” of the knowledge they produce.  Concerns have also arisen that the emphasis on transparency privileges some methodological and epistemological commitments over others.   This working group convenes a cross-disciplinary group of scholars to consider the current state of social science reliability and transparency across a variety of approaches, and explores whether and how principles of transparency and data access can be articulated to encompass different fields and ways of producing knowledge on and understanding the social world. .

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  • 119.Youth Disconnection

    Research on youth disconnection in America.

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