• 101.Social Data Initiative

    Recent revelations about the abuse of Facebook data and spread of disinformation make clear that social media can have negative ramifications for society. Today the SSRC begins an extraordinary Social Data Initiative at the frontiers of digital culture to examine the problem, explore questions about the responsible use of social network data, and generate insights to inform solutions.   .

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  • 102.Strategic Learning and Evaluation

    The Council has a long history of applying qualitative and quantitative social science methods to examine the conditions under which interventions by foundations, governments, and multilateral organizations are and are not successful. One such collaboration, between the Council and the Atlantic Philanthropies, is an ongoing 10-year longitudinal study of the impact of Atlantic’s work in the rural health care sector of Vietnam. Growing out of this work with Atlantic on Vietnam, and drawing on its own network of fellowships around the globe, the Council has been named a strategic learning and evaluation partner for the Atlantic Fellows, a newly established network of fellowships funded by Atlantic Philanthropies. The Atlantic Fellows comprise six large fellowship programs and the Atlantic Institute, a service and community development organization. Each fellowship is aimed at empowering a new generation of leaders and change-makers to advance fairer, healthier, more inclusive, and more equitable societies around the world. Fellows are typically early- to mid-career professionals from a range of backgrounds, disciplines, and life experiences. Through the global, interconnected set of fellowship programs, fellows collaborate across disciplines and borders to understand and address the root causes of pressing global problems. These include socioeconomic and racial inequality; barriers to full participation in democracy; and the social determinants of health and access to quality care. Each of the programs is distinct and grounded in its local context. This fellowship network is designed to secure the legacy of the Atlantic Philanthropies—which made its last grant commitments in 2016 and will close its doors by 2020—in the issue areas and geographies that were its traditional spheres of work. The Atlantic Philanthropies understands that a system of strategic learning and evaluation designed to guide and support the institutions selected for its “big bet” fellowships is essential to ensure that its investments contribute to a learning legacy and make substantial and sustainable impacts. To that end, the Atlantic Fellows programs are initially in a three-year incubation period, during which outside strategic learning and evaluation partners work closely with the fellowship host programs. Once the incubation period is over, the Atlantic Philanthropies will decide whether or not to continue funding the fellowships on a case-by-case basis. The SSRC is serving as the primary learning and evaluation partner for the incubation periods of four of the six programs, providing each fellowship with developmental support, ongoing formative evaluations aimed at improving the structure and organization of the fellowship host institution, and a long-term strategic learning and assessment plan. The Council will also provide a summative evaluation to Atlantic at the end of the incubation period that will be considered as one of the inputs in the final decision regarding future funding. The four programs with which the SSRC is partnering are the Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity, the Atlantic Fellows for Equity in Brain Health, the Atlantic Fellows for Health Equity in Southeast Asia, and the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity. In addition to these four programs for which the SSRC is taking on the role of lead evaluator, the SSRC is coordinating learning and evaluation processes and partners across all six fellowship programs.

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  • 103.Syllabus Collaboration: Democratic Erosion

    We are proud to partner with Democratic Erosion, a cross-university collaborative course that aims to help students critically and systematically evaluate the risks to democracy both in the United States and abroad through the lens of theory, history, and social science. Democratic Erosion is a unique experiment in collaborative pedagogy and learning; the students in the initiative contribute to an undergraduate-written blog, and this term the initiative is also producing a report for USAID. As part of the partnership between Anxieties of Democracy and Democratic Erosion, in the summer of 2018 several students’ work will be featured as part of a special series in the Democracy Papers. The syllabus initiative is led by Robert Blair, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs at Brown University. For more information regarding Democratic Erosion, please contact him and/or Hannah Baron, the teaching and research assistant for the course. For questions about the Democracy Papers or the Anxieties of Democracy program, send an email to democracy@ssrc.org. To follow us on Twitter, please click here: @SSRCanxieties.

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  • 104.Tale of Two Recoveries

    Impact of the US Housing Crisis on the Racial Wealth Gap Across Generations.

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  • 105.The China-Africa Knowledge Project

    Strengthening cross-regional research networks and collaboration.

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  • 106.The China-Africa Knowledge Project Resource Hub

    The China-Africa Knowledge Project Resource Hub is a one-stop shop for researchers and practitioners working on the China-Africa relationship. As the primary platform for the work of the Social Science Research Council’s China-Africa Knowledge Project, this site actively builds generative connections between scholars across disciplines and regions while organizing a growing and fragmented body of knowledge and connecting it to important trends in the social sciences relevant for understanding Africa’s new international relations.  As host to the Chinese in Africa / Africans in China Research Network, it widens the reach of existing cross-regional communities of knowledge. For more information and updates about the China-Africa Knowledge Project, visit china-africa.ssrc.org.

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  • 107.The China-Africa Working Group

    Strengthening cross-regional research networks and collaboration.

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  • 108.The Chinese in Africa/Africans in China Research Network (CA/AC Research Network)

    Strengthening cross-regional research networks and collaboration.

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  • 109.The DR Congo Affinity Group

    Established on 1 November 2012, the Affinity Group on the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is a network of leading scholars and researchers working on the DRC who are deeply familiar with the context of the current challenges facing the country after two decades of war, and who can provide long-term analysis and recommendations to help inform international engagement in the region. This “brain trust” on the DRC provides analysis of the crises facing the DRC and situates these challenges in a long-term view of the political, social, and security trends in the country and the region. Where necessary, the Affinity Group identifies gaps in existing evidence and undertakes the necessary research to fill identified knowledge gaps. As with the landmark Ford Foundation Study Group on South Africa in the 1980s, and the short-lived UN Secretary-General's Resource Group on the DRC established in 1998 at the start of the Second Congo War, the Affinity Group on the DRC seeks to keep its analysis and research firmly distinct from advocacy efforts, yet remains flexible to respond to and help inform policy processes. DRC Affinity Group members: Download DR Congo Affinitiy Group Member Biographies [.pdf] Tatiana Carayannis (Project Director) Social Science Research Council Federico Borello Center for Civilians in Conflict Mvemba Dizolele Johns Hopkins University Jean-Marie Guéhenno International Crisis Group  Fabienne Hara Sciences-Po, Paris School of International Affairs Pascal Kambale Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA) Michel Noureddine Kassa Initiative for a Cohesive Leadership in the DRC Jason Stearns Center on International Cooperation  Jean Omasombo Tshonda The Royal Museum for Central Africa at Tervuren and University of Kinshasa Anneke Van Woudenberg Human Rights Watch Koen Vlassenroot University of Ghent Herbert Weiss The City University of New York.

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  • 110.The Democracy Papers

    The Democracy Papers highlight and summarize new research presented at conferences and workshops related to the Anxieties of Democracy program. The brief essays cover topics including the consequences of party polarization, the dynamics of political participation, encouraging bipartisan compromise, addressing climate change, and representing future generations in current democratic institutions. The Democracy Papers are hosted on Items, the SSRC's Digital Essay Forum. If you enjoy the Democracy Papers, you may also like our collection of reflection essays on the anxieties of democracy, the Inaugural Democracy Papers. These pieces were collected for the launch of the Anxieties of Democracy program in 2014-15.

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  • 111.The Drug Research Papers

    Disseminating research on drug policy.

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  • 112.The Fourth Wave: Violence, Gender, Culture & HIV in the 21st Century

    UNESCO commissioned the SSRC'S HIV/AIDS Program in 2006 to assess the social science, public health, and public policy literature dealing with the sociocultural and gender dimensions of the HIV and AIDS pandemic. Following the publication of an in-depth literature review, the SSRC and UNESCO invited more than twenty senior scholars, policy makers, and practitioners from around the world to contribute to an edited volume about the failure of policies and programs to respond to the growing feminization of the HIV and AIDS pandemic. The volume, co-edited by SSRC Senior Adviser Jennifer Klot and medical anthropologist Vinh-Kim Nguyen,The Fourth Wave: Violence, Gender, Culture & HIV in the 21st Century will be co-published by the SSRC and UNESCO in 2009. Working papers and an interactive essay forum will be launched in summer 2009. .

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  • 113.The Immanent Frame

    Secularism, religion, and the public sphere.

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  • 114.The Media & Democracy Network

    The Media & Democracy Network (MDN) aggregates and curates academic research, news, and opinion investigating the close relationship between media, technology, and democracy. Launched in May 2018, MDN was designed as a place to share, organize, access, and archive the multitude of scholarly work and news/opinion pieces on the Media & Democracy program’s themes, including mis- and disinformation, polarization, hate speech and doxxing, and media consolidation. Collaboration is a key value of MDN; the website will include an “editors-at-large” feature that will allow readers—including faculty, students, journalists, and practitioners—to suggest content for inclusion on the platform. This feature has not yet been released, but you may sign up here to learn more about how to get involved when it does. MDN runs on PressForward, a WordPress plug-in that ensures that the values of sharing, citing, and collegiality are at the heart of MDN's technical and social infrastructure. The Media & Democracy Network is generously supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Democracy Fund, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.

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  • 115.The Religious Lives of Migrant Minorities

    The SSRC Migration Program is sponsoring research to investigate the family, community, and national lives of Christian (Pentecostal), Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist migrants in London, Johannesburg, and Kuala Lumpur. The plan is to produce edited volumes about the religious lives of migrant minorities in each of city and a fourth volume on the themes common to the three sites. This project marks the first attempt by social scientists to compare internationally the role of world religions in the adaptation of migrants to different national contexts.

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  • 116.Transregional Virtual Research Institute

    Media, Activism, and the New Political: InterAsian Perspectives.

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  • 117.Understanding Violent Conflict

    Strengthening the evidence base to better understand the complexities of violent conflict.

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  • 118.University Governance and Autonomy in the Changing Landscape of Higher Education in the Arab World

    The SSRC's Middle East and North Africa Program has undertaken an initiative to explore the role of the Arab university. We are focusing in particular on the efforts being made by academic communities to secure critical spheres of autonomy (vis-à-vis teaching, research, and publishing)--a process that is crucial for a functioning higher education sector and a lively public sphere. Another area of focus is Arab university governance: how has it evolved in response to national, regional, and global restructurings, and what impact has this had on the role of the university?.

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  • 119.Viet Nam Population Health Programme: Strategic Learning and Assessment

    Mobilizing knowledge to assess health and social interventions in Vietnam.

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  • 120.Vietnam Program

    Working to strengthen social science research capacity and links to policymaking in Vietnam.

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  • 121.Web Anthology on Migrant Remittances and Development: Research Perspectives

    In response to the growing interest in the possible contributions that migrants’ remittances can make to development, we have assembled an anthology of research articles that address this process as related to both internal and international migration. The overall goal has been to provide access to articles that bring key conceptual, methodological, and theoretical approaches to topics of central interest to both researchers and policy makers through contemporary research drawn from across the social sciences. Though much of the research is economic in approach, we also provide research based in anthropology, sociology, political science, and other disciplines.   This anthology is an experiment in publication. By agreement with the authors and original publishers, the articles provided for free downloading here will be available for one year, until March 2010. At that time we will reassess whether the anthology should and can be continued and, if so, in what form. Most publishers have allowed free access to their publications; some have charged a fee or imposed other restrictions; others have refused to permit open access to their publications on a “third party” website, even for a fee. Readers of this anthology are encouraged to download the articles provided for personal and educational use.   To download the anthology, go to:  Web Anthology Online Forum.

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  • 122.West Africa: Forced Migration and Human Rights

    To explore how a human rights framework might strengthen protections for forced migrants, the SSRC Migration Program organized research between social scientists and practitioners of international humanitarian and human rights organizations.  Research focused on the causes of forced displacement, protections and work, resettlement, and return of Sierra Leonean forced migrants.

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  • 123.Work with Economists in Cuba

    Fostering new systems in Cuba for distributing goods and services.

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  • 124.Working Group on Climate Change

    Why has climate change been so difficult to address through democratic institutions and processes? What are the consequences of climate change for political processes and outcomes? The Anxieties of Democracy program’s Working Group on Climate Change seeks to make the study of climate change a distinct and recognized area of study in the social sciences. The group’s members do this by seeding climate change-oriented research agendas in their respective fields of expertise. The group’s initiatives include convening conferences with leading as well as emerging scholars, initiating research programs, and training young researchers on the subject of climate change. In November 2017, the group published a series of three state-of-the-field reports that jointly set a political science research agenda for climate change. A short introduction to the reports also appeared in the Democracy Papers. The group is chaired by Professor Robert O. Keohane and Professor Nancy Rosenblum. To follow us on Twitter, please click here: @SSRCanxieties.  Working Group Co-chairs Robert O. Keohane Professor of International Affairs, Princeton University Nancy Rosenblum Senator Joseph Clark Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government, Harvard University Current Members Scott Barrett (Columbia University), Bruce Cain (Stanford University), Jessica Green (New York University), David M. Konisky (Indiana University, Bloomington), Melissa Lane (Princeton University), Douglas McAdam (Stanford University), Michael Oppenheimer (Princeton University), Naomi Oreskes (Harvard University), Michael L. Ross (University of California, Los Angeles), Elke Weber (Princeton University) The following contributors have also supported the mission of the working group: James B. Ang (Nanyang Technological University), Michaël Aklin (University of Pittsburgh), Meir Alkon (Princeton University), Eric Beerbohm (Harvard University), Hilary Boudet (Oregon State University), Y.-H. Henry Chen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Deborah Coen (Yale University), Patrick J. Egan (New York University), Per G. Fredriksson (University of Louisville), Michael Greenstone (University of Chicago), Jennifer Hadden (University of Maryland), Henry Jacoby (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), David Kanter (New York University), Robert E. Kopp (Rutgers University), Ezra Markowitz (University of Massachusetts, Amherst), John Marshall (Columbia University), John McNeill (Georgetown University), Alison E.J. McQueen (Stanford University), Matto Mildenberger (University of California, Santa Barbara), Megan Mullin (Duke University), Victoria Murillo (Columbia University), Rachael Shwom (Rutgers University), Leah Stokes (University of California, Santa Barbara), Johannes Urpelainen (Johns Hopkins University), Audrye Wong (Princeton University).

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  • 125.Working Group on Distribution

    How have changes in the structure of the global economy thrown long settled features of distribution into question? Distinctive national institutions and politics filter economic shifts, and this working group seeks to understand how politics, the economy, and civil society intertwine to set the stage for a future settlement that may be different from country to country. The topics this working group explores include: Macro transformations: Are we in a period in which basic assumptions about the relationship between capitalism and democracy have shifted? The New Precariat: Economic shifts and new insecurities have had far-reaching repercussions for workers, as well as those in previously privileged positions. Experiencing Insecurity: How do newly and traditionally insecure citizens understand their opportunities and prospects? Creating the Future: How have shifts in the global economy impacted domestic coalition building? What are the appropriate public responses to new insecurities? The group is chaired by Professor Frances Rosenbluth and Professor Margaret Weir. To follow us on Twitter, please click here: @SSRCanxieties.  Working Group Co-chairs Frances Rosenbluth Damon Wells Professor of Political Science, Yale University Margaret Weir Wilson Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science, Brown University Members Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat (Duke University), Ben Ansell (Oxford University), Carles Boix (Princeton University), Andrea Campbell (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Donald Davis (Columbia University), Andra Gillespie (Emory University), Jane Gingrich (Oxford University), Jacob Hacker (Yale University), Alice Kessler-Harris (Columbia University), K. Sabeel Rahman (Brooklyn Law School), Kathleen Thelen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Jonathan Rodden (Stanford University), Douglas S. Massey (Princeton University). The following contributors have also supported the mission of the working group: Stephen Ansolabehere (Harvard University), Desmond King (Oxford University), Ilyana Kuziemko (Princeton University), Kimberly Morgan (George Washington University), Bruno Palier (Paris School of International Affairs), Andreas Wiedemann (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Image credit: “Not Equal” by holeymoon [CC BY 2.0].

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