• 126.Travel Grants for Cuban Scholars

    Providing Cuban scholars access to international scholarly networks.

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  • 127.Uncertainty in Extreme Weather Events

    Uncertainty pervades the prediction and experience of hazardous weather.  It emerges in the development of weather research and models, the construction and communication of forecasts, the interpretation of those forecasts and perceptions of weather risks, and in the complex process of responding to and recovering from hazardous weather. While uncertainty is inherent to meteorological processes and our ability to predict them, there are also more entangled sources of social and cultural ambiguity that emerge, interact, and propagate throughout the lifecycle of hazardous weather events. Significant research exists within the field of risk communication regarding meteorological uncertainty in weather forecasts, how it is communicated, and how it is understood, but less attention has been paid to these other types of uncertainty. People engaged at any stage of the process from prediction to recovery – including atmospheric scientists, operational forecasters, emergency managers, broadcasters, and members of the public – interpret, infer, and consider uncertainty in their perceptions and decision making. However, little is known about how to identify or characterize the non-meteorological variables that are always relevant to decision-making in the face of a forecast or warning.   This project brings together experts and practitioners from across the social and natural sciences to examine how further social science research can enrich our understanding of context, communication, and social dynamics that ultimately impact decision-making and behavior during extreme weather events.   Project Coordinators: Julie Demuth Project Scientist, Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Jennifer Henderson  Postdoctoral Fellow, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Heather Lazrus Project Scientist, Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research.

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  • 128.Understanding Violent Conflict

    Strengthening the evidence base to better understand the complexities of violent conflict.

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  • 129.University Governance and Autonomy in the Changing Landscape of Higher Education in the Arab World

    The SSRC's Middle East and North Africa Program has undertaken an initiative to explore the role of the Arab university. We are focusing in particular on the efforts being made by academic communities to secure critical spheres of autonomy (vis-à-vis teaching, research, and publishing)--a process that is crucial for a functioning higher education sector and a lively public sphere. Another area of focus is Arab university governance: how has it evolved in response to national, regional, and global restructurings, and what impact has this had on the role of the university?.

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  • 130.Viet Nam Population Health Programme: Strategic Learning and Assessment

    Mobilizing knowledge to assess health and social interventions in Vietnam.

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  • 131.Ways of Water

    In recent decades, freshwater resources essential for human health and livelihoods have come under increasing pressure. Even as demand rises for human and industrial uses, water is less available because of privatization, or increasingly dangerous, as industrial and agricultural activity introduce new forms of pollutants, and climate change upends the predictability of water cycles. In response, new efforts to ensure water quality and access for both human and nonhuman users within a unified environmental stewardship perspective are proliferating. At the same time, scholarly attention to water largely remains siloed inside distinct disciplinary boundaries.  This working group aims to engage water from within the scholarly borderlands. Trained in the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies, they approach water as a multiplicity of objects. It is always present, even as it emerges in particular historical and cultural contexts, contingent upon the actions of human and non-human actors alike. However tempting it is to think of water as H20, water does not exist in the abstract; it cannot—in practice—be reduced to a formula. Whether an object of scientific study, aesthetic appreciation, economic use, ecological necessity, or everyday consumption, it is only encountered in, through, and as different kinds of bodies.  Working alongside scholars from a range of disciplines, this project seeks not only to identify the lacunae inherent in current approaches to knowing water, but also to determine the synergistic possibilities opened by combining the strengths of our disciplinary frames and methodologies. In approaching water as an active object, they aim to open up new pathways and methodologies for understanding and intervention. Project Chairs Etienne Benson Janice and Julian Bers Assistant Professor in the Social Sciences, University of Pennsylvania Christy Spackman Assistant Professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society, Arizona State University   Current Participants   Samer Alatout (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Aimee Bahng (Pomona College), Andrea Ballestero (Rice University), Debjani Bhattacharyya (Drexel University), Kevin Dawson (University of California, Merced), Hi'ilei Hobart (Columbia University), Eve Mosher (Liquid Cities and Works on Water), Amanda Schachter (SLO Architecture), and Marsha Weisiger (University of Oregon).

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  • 132.Web Anthology on Migrant Remittances and Development: Research Perspectives

    In response to the growing interest in the possible contributions that migrants’ remittances can make to development, we have assembled an anthology of research articles that address this process as related to both internal and international migration. The overall goal has been to provide access to articles that bring key conceptual, methodological, and theoretical approaches to topics of central interest to both researchers and policy makers through contemporary research drawn from across the social sciences. Though much of the research is economic in approach, we also provide research based in anthropology, sociology, political science, and other disciplines.   This anthology is an experiment in publication. By agreement with the authors and original publishers, the articles provided for free downloading here will be available for one year, until March 2010. At that time we will reassess whether the anthology should and can be continued and, if so, in what form. Most publishers have allowed free access to their publications; some have charged a fee or imposed other restrictions; others have refused to permit open access to their publications on a “third party” website, even for a fee. Readers of this anthology are encouraged to download the articles provided for personal and educational use.   To download the anthology, go to:  Web Anthology Online Forum.

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  • 133.West Africa: Forced Migration and Human Rights

    To explore how a human rights framework might strengthen protections for forced migrants, the SSRC Migration Program organized research between social scientists and practitioners of international humanitarian and human rights organizations.  Research focused on the causes of forced displacement, protections and work, resettlement, and return of Sierra Leonean forced migrants.

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  • 134.Work with Economists in Cuba

    Fostering new systems in Cuba for distributing goods and services.

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  • 135.Working Group on Climate Change

    Why has climate change been so difficult to address through democratic institutions and processes? What are the consequences of climate change for political processes and outcomes? The Anxieties of Democracy program’s Working Group on Climate Change seeks to make the study of climate change a distinct and recognized area of study in the social sciences. The group’s members do this by seeding climate change-oriented research agendas in their respective fields of expertise. The group’s initiatives include convening conferences with leading as well as emerging scholars, initiating research programs, and training young researchers on the subject of climate change. In November 2017, the group published a series of three state-of-the-field reports that jointly set a political science research agenda for climate change. A short introduction to the reports also appeared in the Democracy Papers. The group is chaired by Professor Robert O. Keohane and Professor Nancy Rosenblum. To follow us on Twitter, please click here: @SSRCanxieties.  Working Group Co-chairs Robert O. Keohane Professor of International Affairs, Princeton University Nancy Rosenblum Senator Joseph Clark Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government, Emerita, Harvard University Current Members Scott Barrett (Columbia University), Bruce Cain (Stanford University), Jessica Green (University of Toronto), Solomon Hsiang (University of California, Berkeley), Sikina Jinnah (University of California, Santa Cruz), David M. Konisky (Indiana University, Bloomington), Melissa Lane (Princeton University), Douglas McAdam (Stanford University), Michael Oppenheimer (Princeton University), Naomi Oreskes (Harvard University), Aseem Prakash (University of Washington), Michael L. Ross (University of California, Los Angeles), Leah Stokes (University of California, Santa Barbara), Dustin Tingley (Harvard University), Elke Weber (Princeton University) The following contributors have also supported the mission of the working group: James B. Ang (Nanyang Technological University), Michaël Aklin (University of Pittsburgh), Meir Alkon (Princeton University), Eric Beerbohm (Harvard University), Hilary Boudet (Oregon State University), Y.-H. Henry Chen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Deborah Coen (Yale University), Patrick J. Egan (New York University), Per G. Fredriksson (University of Louisville), Michael Greenstone (University of Chicago), Jennifer Hadden (University of Maryland), Henry Jacoby (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), David Kanter (New York University), Robert E. Kopp (Rutgers University), Ezra Markowitz (University of Massachusetts, Amherst), John Marshall (Columbia University), John McNeill (Georgetown University), Alison E.J. McQueen (Stanford University), Matto Mildenberger (University of California, Santa Barbara), Megan Mullin (Duke University), Victoria Murillo (Columbia University), Rachael Shwom (Rutgers University), Leah Stokes (University of California, Santa Barbara), Johannes Urpelainen (Johns Hopkins University), Audrye Wong (Princeton University).

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  • 136.Working Group on Distribution

    How have changes in the structure of the global economy thrown long settled features of distribution into question? Distinctive national institutions and politics filter economic shifts, and this working group seeks to understand how politics, the economy, and civil society intertwine to set the stage for a future settlement that may be different from country to country. The group is working toward an edited volume, for submission to the Anxieties of Democracy book series with Cambridge University Press. Tentatively titled "The New Politics of Insecurity", the volume addresses questions of economic precarity, geographic patterns in economic segregation, and the role of the welfare state in a time when the relationship between capitalism and democracy is shifting. The group is chaired by Professor Frances Rosenbluth and Professor Margaret Weir. To follow us on Twitter, please click here: @SSRCanxieties.  Working Group Co-chairs Frances Rosenbluth Damon Wells Professor of Political Science, Yale University Margaret Weir Wilson Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science, Brown University Members Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat (Duke University), Ben Ansell (Oxford University), Carles Boix (Princeton University), Andra Gillespie (Emory University), Jane Gingrich (Oxford University), Jacob Hacker (Yale University), Alice Kessler-Harris (Columbia University), Douglas S. Massey (Princeton University), K. Sabeel Rahman (Demos, Brooklyn Law School), Jonathan Rodden(Stanford University), Kathleen Thelen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and Kris-Stella Trump (Social Science Research Council). The following contributors have also supported the mission of the working group: Stephen Ansolabehere (Harvard University), Andrea Campbell (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Donald Davis (Columbia University), Desmond King (Oxford University), Ilyana Kuziemko (Princeton University), Kimberly Morgan (George Washington University), Bruno Palier (Paris School of International Affairs), Andreas Wiedemann (Oxford University).

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  • 137.Working Group on Institutions

    The U.S. system, with its complex array of checks and balances, usually requires broad consensus to function. But this consensus rarely emerges in this era of ideological polarization, close two-party competition, public distrust, and hyperpartisanship. Meanwhile, policy challenges continue to mount, amidst growing economic, social, and political inequalities. The working group on Institutions addresses concerns about the performance and legitimacy of representative political institutions. The group operates under two assumptions: first, polarized parties are a fact of life, given the long evolutionary processes that have ideologically sorted the parties and that have finally brought U.S. parties into alignment with those in other advanced democracies. Second, major constitutional reform altering the U.S. system will not be forthcoming. If these two assumptions are correct, what does this mean for policymaking, federalism, and the functioning of American governmental institutions?  The working group on Institutions produced the first volume in the Anxieties of Democracy book series, published with Cambridge University Press. "Can America Govern Itself?" (release date June 2019) brings together a diverse group of distinguished scholars to analyze how rising party polarization and economic inequality have affected the performance of American governing institutions. In collaboration with the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University, this group also organized a January 2019 conference on "Political Institutions and Challenges to Democracy: America in Comparative Perspective", which brought together political scientists from comparative politics and American politics to exchange perspectives regarding the role of institutions in times of challenges to democracy. The group is chaired by Professor Frances Lee and Professor Nolan McCarty. To follow us on Twitter, please click here: @SSRCanxieties.  Working Group Co-chairs Frances Lee Professor of Government and Politics, University of Maryland Nolan McCarty Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Princeton University The following scholars contributed to the "The Anxieties of American Democracy" volume of the Anxieties of Democracy book series with Cambridge University Press Kenneth Benoit (London School of Economics), Brandice Canes-Wrone (Princeton University), Anthony Chen (Northwestern University), James Curry (The University of Utah), Lee Drutman (New America Foundation), Nathan Gibson (Princeton University), Daniel Gillion (University of Pennsylvania), Matthew Grossman (Michigan State University), Peter Hanson (University of Denver), Timothy LaPira (James Madison University), Claire Leavitt (Cornell University), Suzanne Mettler (Cornell University), Kevin Munger (New York University), Gillian Metzger (Columbia University), Sam Rosenfeld (Colgate University), Daniel Scholzman (Johns Hopkins University), David Spence (University of Texas at Austin), and Arthur Spirling (New York University).  The following contributors have also supported the mission of the working group: Julia Azari (Marquette University), Daniel Carpenter (Harvard University), Julio Carrión (University of Delaware), Amanda Driscoll (Florida State University),  Elisabeth Gerber (University of Michigan), Noam Gidron (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Anna Grzymala-Busse (Stanford University), Sara Wallace Goodman (University of California, Irvine), Gretchen Helmke (University of Rochester), Alexander Hertel-Fernandez (Columbia University), Will Horne (Princeton University), Meg Jacobs (Princeton University), Katherine Krimmel (Barnard College), Didi Kuo (Stanford University), Jordan Kyle (Tony Blair Institute for Global Change), Noam Lupu (Venderbilt University), Jennifer McCoy (Georgia State University), Gillian Metzger (Columbia University), Robert Mickey (University of Michigan), Maria Victoria Murillo (Columbia University), Michael Nelson (Pennsylvania State University), Paul Pierson (University of California, Berkeley), David J. Samuels (Univ…

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  • 138.Working Group on Security

    Modern democracies face threats of various sizes, sources, and duration, from both state- and non-state actors. As a result, classical conceptions of a state’s security status no longer fit neatly into categories of peace, crisis, and war. These threats and the responses to them can raise hard questions about how to proceed within the ambit of democratic norms and institutions.  The working group on the Politics of Security considers these issues and more, probing the repertoire of institutions and ideas that democracies use to deal with threats. In the course of this work, the group addresses a range of issues, including population movements, war, terror, and tensions of security and privacy. To follow us on Twitter, please click here: @SSRCanxieties.  The following contributors have supported the mission of the working group: Jessica D. Blankshain (U.S. Naval War College), Gabriella Blum (Harvard University), Paul Collier (University of Oxford), Shaheed Fatima (Blackstone Chambers), Joshua Geltzer (Georgetown University), Zachary K. Goldman (New York University), Emily O. Goldman(University of California, Davis), Samuel Issacharoff (New York University),  Ira Katznelson (Columbia University), Stephen D. Krasner(Stanford University), Liora Lazarus (Oxford University), Uday Methta (City University of New York), Pasquale Pasquino (New York University), Dana Priest (University of Maryland), Kiron Skinner (Carnegie Mellon University), Julian Zelizer (Princeton University).

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  • 139.Working Group: Curating Knowledge

    Curating Knowledge Under Digital Conditions Transformations associated with digitization are causing significant shifts in the “scholarly ecosystem” of universities, book and journal publishers, and libraries that have historically served to set standards for the judgment of scholarly quality and impact.  In light of the increased access to knowledge that digitization allows, maintaining and enhancing standards of quality while democratizing access. Key questions addressed by this working group include: What is the role of the traditional “gatekeepers” of scholarly knowledge in this context? When are more open forms of curation compelling, and when are more traditional and demanding approaches appropriate? How can core values and practices of scholarship (e.g. peer review) be preserved under changing conditions, and how should scholarly practices and institutions be modified and adapted in light of these transformations? By what criteria should libraries, archives, and other curatorial institutions make choices in regard to what they collect and preserve? This working group brings together representatives from these different realms in order to discuss the principles, standards, and practices that should govern editorial curation. Co-chairs: Mary Lee Kennedy Chief Library Officer, New York Public Library Michael Schudson Professor of Journalism and Sociology, Columbia University.

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  • 140.Working Group: Digital Social Science

    Digital Social Science This working group will engage how social scientists use digital tools, methods, and data sources in their research. This includes “big data” (whether from the internet, social media, geo-spatial techniques, or more traditional quantitative and textual sources); the use of visualization tools for the collection, organization and analysis of data; and other ways in which data and information science is intersecting or could intersect with the social sciences. Along with these opportunities come serious challenges—scientific, practical and ethical—that may result from the expanding use of these forms of knowledge. Key questions addressed by the working group include: What can “big data” tell us about our social world and how it works—and what can’t we learn from it?  How can social science shape the norms and rules for how “big data” is collected and made available? How can we establish partnerships between social scientists and the businesses that own proprietary data, as well as the algorithms that organize their collection and use, for scientific and public benefit—while at the same time protecting privacy of research subjects when “informed consent” is neither required nor expected? How will new tools like information visualization, increasingly being used in fields like history, shape how social scientists are trained, and how they collaborate with each other? The group brings together a range of interested scholars and constituencies—social scientists, data scientists, legal scholars, digital humanists, and relevant actors in the private and public sector—to more deeply understand the ramifications of these innovations in the study of society, and to discover and shape how they might be used in ethical and public-minded ways. Co-chairs: Victoria Stodden Associate Professor of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Duncan Watts Principal Researcher, Microsoft Research.

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  • 141.Working Group: Transparency and Reliability in the Social Sciences

    Reliability and Transparency in the Social Sciences Enabled by advances in digital technology, the availability of social science research has increased exponentially, and the stakes of making it so have increased with it. Recent high-profile media coverage concerning the practices and reliability of the social sciences has brought it much attention, and not all of which is positive. More accessible data can deepen the reliability of social science, and is called for by funders and an increasing number of journals in a range of fields.  Digital technology also allows for scholars to provide access to the analytical process they use to connect evidence to interpretative and theoretical claims in ways not possible within the space constraints of a journal article.  Making this process “transparent” is central to sustaining a broader scholarly conversation. While the benefits of access to knowledge for use by the broader research community are many and varied, research transparency as a scholarly value is at times in tension with other values. These include the protection and privacy of human subjects as well as the safeguarding of intellectual property, not trivial for scholars who seek “first use” of the knowledge they produce.  Concerns have also arisen that the emphasis on transparency privileges some methodological and epistemological commitments over others.   This working group convenes a cross-disciplinary group of scholars to consider the current state of social science reliability and transparency across a variety of approaches, and explores whether and how principles of transparency and data access can be articulated to encompass different fields and ways of producing knowledge on and understanding the social world. .

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  • 142.Youth Disconnection

    Research on youth disconnection in America.

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