Workshop

Digital Threats to Democracy: Comparative Lessons and Possible Remedies

“Digital Threats to Democracy: Comparative Lessons and Possible Remedies” was a two-day research workshop that brought together both emerging and senior scholars to present comparative research on the impact of digital media on democratic processes and institutions, including topics such as dis- and misinformation, propaganda, and political polarization. The workshop was held June 13-14 at the Social Science Research Council in Brooklyn, New York. The workshop was organized in partnership with the International Journal of Press/Politics. Participants in the workshop were invited to submit their work for a special issue in IJPP, an open call for which is now available here (deadline: …

China-Africa Peace Fellowship Preparatory Workshop

On June 28, 2019, Understanding Violent Conflict Director Tatiana Carayannis and Program Associate Nisreen Yonis participated in the first of three workshops for the 2018-2020 cohort of China-Africa Peace Fellows. Guided by program staff and hosted by Professor Wang Yi Zhou, the deputy dean of the School of International Studies at Peking University, the Fellows reflected on findings, challenges, and the current status of their fieldwork research and writing.

African Peacebuilding Network Grantee Research Methods Training Workshop

The African Peacebuilding Network (APN) and the Next Generation Social Sciences in Africa (Next Gen) program held a week-long joint workshop in Peduase, Aburi, Ghana for the 2019 cohort of APN Individual Research Grant (IRG) recipients and the 2019 cohort of Next Gen fellows. The workshop was organized in collaboration with the University of Ghana, Legon from June 24—28, 2019. 15 APN Individual Research Grant participants benefited from lectures, working group sessions, and one-on-one dialogues with experienced facilitators, including senior scholars, and current and former APN Advisory Board members. The grantees met from June 24th to June 26th, 2019. The workshop …

Digital Threats to Democracy: Comparative Lessons and Possible Remedies

“Digital Threats to Democracy: Comparative Lessons and Possible Remedies” was a two-day research workshop that brought together both emerging and senior scholars to present comparative research on the impact of digital media on democratic processes and institutions, including topics such as dis- and misinformation, propaganda, and political polarization. The workshop was held June 13-14 at the Social Science Research Council in Brooklyn, New York. The workshop was organized in partnership with the International Journal of Press/Politics. Participants in the workshop were invited to submit their work for a special issue in IJPP, an open call for which is now available here (deadline: …

A Modern History of the Disinformation Age: Communication, Technology, and Democracy in Transition Workshop

What are the roots of our “epistemic crisis” regarding what counts as facts and as “reality?” Participants focused on actors who benefit from the questioning of truth claims, how institutions that once served as gatekeepers for such claims have been weakened and are now unable to adjust to new media ecosystems, and how new maladapted gatekeeping institutions have taken their place. Participants included: Steven Livingston, Professor of Media and Public Affairs & Professor of International Affairs, George Washington University Patricia Aufderheide, University Professor of Communication Studies, American University Yochai Benkler, Jack N. and Lillian R. Berkman Professor for Entrepreneurial Legal …

Media, Technology, and Democracy in Historical Context

If you consult recent headlines, the news media is in crisis, and the problems are manifold: disruptive changes to media technology, the spread of misleading news, and anonymous harassment of public figures are causing serious concerns about the quality and trajectory of our democracy and the place of the news media in it. At the same time, these phenomena are not new; disruptions, falsehoods, and harassment have been topics of public concern at various moments throughout the history of media and democracy. How does the current moment, dominated by concerns over the rise of social media, the prevalence of online …

Bi-Annual Fellows Workshop

Nairobi, Kenya – Fellows from the Social Science Research Council’s (SSRC) Next Generation Social Sciences in Africa (Next Gen) program gathered in Nairobi, Kenya, during the second week of January for the 14th bi-annual fellows workshop.  The event was held in partnership with United States International University-Africa (USIU-Africa), and in collaboration with the SSRC’s African Peacebuilding Network (APN) program, which held its grantees workshop from January 9-11, 2019. 28 doctoral dissertation proposal development and research fellows from eight African countries were joined by five dynamic workshop facilitators and convened in Nairobi for the three-day event.  The workshop was designed to help …

China’s OBOR Initiative and Its Impacts for Asian Countries

WORKSHOP DIRECTORS: Anh Nguyen Dang Vice-President, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences danganhphat1609@gmail.com Wenfei Winnie Wang Senior Lecturer in Human Geography, University of Bristol w.wang@bristol.ac.uk CALL FOR WORKSHOP PAPERS: In 2013, Chinese premier Xi Jinping announced a pair of new development and trade initiatives for China and the surrounding region: the “Silk Road Economic Belt” and the “Twenty-First- Century Maritime Silk Road,” together known as “One Belt, One Road“ (OBOR). Along with the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), the OBOR policies represent an ambitious spatial expansion of Chinese state capitalism, driven by an excess of industrial production capacity, as well as …

Divine/Transcendent Rulers of Imagined Communities: The Rise and Fall of Royal Nationhood in Asia

Workshop Directors Wasana Wongsurawat Assistant Professor, History, Chulalongkorn University wwongsurawat@hotmail.com Michael K. Connors Associate Professor, School of Politics History and International Relations, University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus michael.connors@nottingham.edu.my Call for Workshop Papers The myth of the divine or virtuous ruler—the son of heaven, the Buddha reincarnated, the avatar of Vishnu, the descendant of the sun goddess, etc.—is just about as visceral and grounded in lived existence as the imagined community that is the modern nation-state, a form which has become dominant in the postcolonial era. And they largely shared the same technologies of propagation. Yet, these two imaginaries that have …

Menu