Immigration: The Politics of Inclusion and the Politics of Threat

, 9:00am –
Social Science Research Council 300 Cadman Plaza West, 15 Fl

Immigration: The Politics of Inclusion and the Politics of Threat was a one-day research workshop that took place at Social Science Research Council headquarters in Brooklyn, New York on March 29, 2019.

The workshop gathered scholars to address the politics of immigration, with a particular focus on how and why Latin American immigration is politicized (sometimes as virtue and increasingly as threat) in the United States in the contemporary period. Scholars were organized into panels on three themes: Parties, Voter Linkages, and Immigration Politics; Framing Immigrants; and Policies of the State.

Panels and Participants 
Parties, Voter Linkages, and Immigration Politics
What is the partisan/electoral basis of xenophobic and restrictive policies – within the US and at the border?  To what degree is this stable/changing and why?  What explains when and why parties promote inclusive/exclusive platforms and policies towards immigrants? To what degree are state/local level parties replicating/breaking from national party platforms?   How have immigrants in the US reacted/responded to the country’s changing party dynamics? What explains variations in reaction?

Chair
Nancy Bermeo, Senior Research Fellow, Nuffield College, University of Oxford

Discussant 
Katherine Cramer, Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Presenters
Matt Barreto, Professor of Political Science and Chicana/o Studies, University of California, Los Angeles
James McCann, Professor of Political Science, Purdue University
Melissa Michelson, Professor of Political Science, Menlo College
Veronica Terriquez, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of California, Riverside

Framing Immigrants
What explains the contours of public opinion towards immigrants (undocumented, daca-mented, documented)?  To what degree does public opinion distinguish between a) un/documented immigrants and b) between Latin American immigrants and Latinos?  How do immigrants respond to the anxieties of the receiving society—how do they respond to xenophobia?  Are there differences by legal status, by region, by national origin group?

Chair 
Michael Jones-Correa, President's Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania

Discussant
Sara Wallace Goodman, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of California, Irvine

Presenters
Abigail Fisher Williamson, Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Policy and Law, Trinity College
Shannon Gleeson, Associate Professor of Labor Relations, Law & History, Cornell University
Sofya Aptekar, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Massachusetts, Boston
Cecilia Menjívar, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles
Matthew Wright, Associate Professor of Political Science, American University

Policies of the State
Policies towards immigrants range from the inclusionary (extending social welfare) to the punitive (criminalizing and penalizing undocumented workers).  What explains the range of policies and laws that are adopted and what are the consequences for the immigrant community (documented and undocumented)?  What impact have these policies had on immigration and immigrants?


Chair
Deborah Yashar, Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University

Discussant
Marie Gottschalk, Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania

Presenters
Amada Armenta, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning, University of California, Los Angeles
David Cortez, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Notre Dame
Roberto G. Gonzales, Professor of Education, Harvard University
Karthick Ramakrishnan, Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, University of California, Riverside