Raze, rebuild, repeat: why Japan knocks down its houses after 30 years

Article written by 2016 Abe Journalism Fellow Nate Berg based on his project "Urbanization, Technology and the Evolution of Japanese Housing."

Berg writes: "Scaffolding surrounds a vacant house on a corner and workers from Daiwa House are clanging away inside. They’re not demolishing the house but refurbishing it – reorganising the floor plan, knocking down walls, opening up the kitchen and enhancing the insulation. Rather than tear down the house so the next buyer can build something new, they’re rebuilding it from the inside and putting it back on the market. It’s a relatively rare commodity, but something that is increasingly common across Japan: a secondhand home."


Title
Raze, rebuild, repeat: why Japan knocks down its houses after 30 years
Author
Berg, Nate
Published
The Guardian, November 16, 2017
On the web
Citation
Berg, Nate, Raze, rebuild, repeat: why Japan knocks down its houses after 30 years (The Guardian, November 16, 2017), https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/nov/16/japan-reusable-housing-revolution.