The Encoded Cirebon Mask: Materiality, Flow, and Meaning along Java’s Islamic Northwest Coast

Ross, Laurie Margot
In The Encoded Cirebon Mask: Materiality, Flow, and Meaning along Java’s Islamic Northwest Coast, 2012 Transregional Research Postdoctoral fellow Laurie Margot Ross situates masks and masked dancing in the Cirebon region of Java (Indonesia) as an original expression of Islam. This is a different view from that of many scholars, who argue that canonical prohibitions on fashioning idols and imagery prove that masks are mere relics of indigenous beliefs that Muslim travelers could not eradicate. Making use of archives, oral histories, and the performing objects themselves, Ross traces the mask’s trajectory from a popular entertainment in Cirebon—once a portal of global exchange—to a stimulus for establishing a deeper connection to God in late colonial Java, and eventual links to nationalism in post-independence Indonesia.
Title
The Encoded Cirebon Mask: Materiality, Flow, and Meaning along Java’s Islamic Northwest Coast
Author
Ross, Laurie Margot
Published
Brill Academic Pub, August 2016
ISBN
9789004311374
On the web
Citation
Ross, Laurie Margot, The Encoded Cirebon Mask: Materiality, Flow, and Meaning along Java’s Islamic Northwest Coast (Brill Academic Pub, August 2016), http://www.brill.com/products/book/encoded-cirebon-mask.